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How to Remove Static Electricity From Your Home (30+ Tips)

Victoria is a stay-at-home mom, author, educator, and blogger at Healthy at Home. She currently lives in Colorado with her family.

Read on to learn how to get rid of static electricity in your house, clothing, and hair.

Read on to learn how to get rid of static electricity in your house, clothing, and hair.

Why Is There So Much Static in My House?

Winter is traditionally the time of year when your clothes start sticking to you, your hair starts sticking up, and you are shocking just about everyone you touch. This is because you probably don't live in the tropics, meaning your wintertime is cold and dry—the perfect conditions for static buildup! To make things worse, people usually respond to the cold by cranking up the heat, further reducing the humidity in the air.

Your clothes are probably crackling, your bedsheets are sticking and popping, and if you’re lucky enough to have animals, you can see the little "lightning bolts" when you pet them, and their fur gets caught anywhere and everywhere.

This crackling, popping, sticking up, and lightning you see in your clothes, in your sheets, and on your pets is called static—and it's no fun. Luckily, there are tons of great ideas for reducing and preventing static electricity. I’ve taken the liberty of eliminating the ones that didn’t work for us and adding a few extras that we have discovered.

Static may look cute here, but it's not always so sweet. Learn how to prevent static in your house this winter.

Static may look cute here, but it's not always so sweet. Learn how to prevent static in your house this winter.

How to Get Rid of Static Electricity in the House (4 Tips)

As dry air is one big reason static electricity becomes such a problem, it only makes sense to incorporate some water into the air to attack the static. Here are some great ways to do just that!

Tip #1: Use a Humidifier

As dry air is one big reason static electricity becomes such a problem, it only makes sense to incorporate some water into the air to attack the static. Humidifiers are a great no-stress fix for static; they have proven effective at reducing random shocks, static cling, and static in hair.

One of the benefits of humidifiers is that you can run them all day and all night, helping keep the humidity in your home constant.

While it isn't a "forever fix," keeping a pot of boiling water on the stove is an easy way to get rid of static. Adding citrus peels and cinnamon will make your house smell good too!

While it isn't a "forever fix," keeping a pot of boiling water on the stove is an easy way to get rid of static. Adding citrus peels and cinnamon will make your house smell good too!

Tip #2: Keep a Pot of Boiling Water on the Stove

If you don't want to invest in a humidifier, you can do the DIY version with a pot on the stove, though this fix can only be used for a few hours each day. I learned the hard way that you cannot boil water in the same pot every day all day long without ruining both your stove and your pot!

Note: If you add a little cinnamon or citrus peel, it'll double as an air freshener!

Tip #3: Invest in More House Plants

For a technique that will combat static cling and beautify your home, try incorporating more plants into your living space. Crazy as it might seem, house plants are actually very effective humidifiers. Here are the best plants for re-humidifying dry indoor air.

Tip #4: Use Static Guard on Your Carpets

Carpets are a huge culprit behind static shocks, but using a static guard spray, either store-bought or homemade (a mix of two cups of water and two tablespoons each of fabric softener and vinegar in a spray bottle), can significantly reduce carpet-generated static.

Just bear in mind that you don't need to soak your carpet for this fix to be effective. A misting is enough!

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Air-drying your clothes is just one of many ways  to prevent them from generating static.

Air-drying your clothes is just one of many ways to prevent them from generating static.

How to Get Rid of Static in Clothes (13 Tips)

At some point or another, we've all felt that pesky shock when folding a fresh pile of laundry. But there are many ways to keep that from happening. Here are a few tried-and-true methods for reducing static in your laundry.

Tip #1: Use Vinegar, Less Detergent, and Safety Pins

Hands down, the best solution I have found for getting rid of static in your clothes and bedding is adding a 1/4 cup of white vinegar into the fabric softener area when washing your clothes, reducing the amount of laundry detergent you use by at least half, and adding safety pins to inconspicuous areas on the items before drying.

Then toss a couple of dryer sheets into the dryer, lower the heat level, and make sure not to over-dry your items.

I was shocked when I saw my dog-hair-covered comforter come out of the dryer with NO DOG HAIR the first time! It was awe-inspiring. I even saved it to show my husband when he came home.

Note: Attaching a safety pin to your clothing discharges the electrical buildup in your clothes, reducing static cling and preventing shocks!

Tip #2: Use Fabric Softener

Fabric softener is to your clothes what conditioner is to your hair. By adding a little bit of fabric softener to the clothes in your washing machine, you can give them the moisture that they need to make it through the drying stage without collecting any static electricity. While this may not completely solve all of your laundry static problems, it will go a long way towards helping.

Tip #3: Use Dryer Sheets

The whole purpose of dryer sheets is for them to work on your laundry in the dryer, just like fabric softener works in the washing machine. They give your laundry some extra moisture, make it all smell wonderful, and take some of the static electricity out of your clothing as it dries.

But this isn’t the only area where they can be helpful. If your hair, your clothes, your comforter, or even your couches have static and/or are collecting animal hair like magnets, rub a fresh dryer sheet over them to get rid of it.

Tip #4: Use Wool Dryer Balls

These dryer balls absorb moisture from clothing in the dryer and help to maintain a more humid environment as the clothes are drying, thereby reducing static. If you're feeling crafty, you can make your own DIY wool dryer balls.

Bonus: On top of being more environmentally friendly than a fabric softener or dryer sheets, wool dryer balls reduce drying time and wrinkles, fluff clothes, and keep large items like sheets from getting tangled. They're also pet-hair magnets!

Tip #5: Air Dry Your Clothes

As heat is a major creator of static electricity, especially in your clothing, tossing your clothes in the dryer or pulling out your blow dryer to dry your hair are the worst possible choices you could make if you are trying to avoid static. Instead, consider air-drying the clothing you have the most problems with static-wise (likely the ones made of synthetic materials).

You could even do the same with your hair. Both of these options might take a bit of pre-planning on your part so that your clothes are dry when you need them and you aren’t going outside in the cold with wet hair. But if you can pull it off, you’ll have much fewer issues with static.

Dryer add-ins are a low-effort way to keep your clothes from getting staticky. From a damp washcloth to a ball of tinfoil, it couldn't be easier.

Dryer add-ins are a low-effort way to keep your clothes from getting staticky. From a damp washcloth to a ball of tinfoil, it couldn't be easier.

Tip #6: Toss a Damp Rag in the Dryer

If air-drying your clothes just isn’t an option, there is another way to keep the heat in your dryer from completely drying out your clothes and turning them into a staticky bundle of sparks. During the last 10–20 minutes of your drying cycle, toss in a damp washcloth. This will provide the necessary humidity to finish drying your clothes without loading them with static.

Of course, you could always dry them to the point of damp and then take them out before they are completely dry to prevent static from developing, but who wants to have damp clothes that still need to air dry in the WINTER?

Tip #7: Run a Metal Hanger Over Your Clothes

This definitely doesn’t sound like it should work (in fact, it sounds pretty foolish!), but it really does help. Running a piece of metal along your clothes will transfer the electrical charges in your clothes to the hanger, returning your clothes to a balanced electrical state.

Tip #8: Dry Synthetic Clothes Separately

Synthetic materials generate far more static than natural ones, so drying natural fabrics separately from synthetic ones can go a long way toward reducing static.

Tip #9: Pop a Ball of Aluminum Foil in the Dryer

Need a short-term fix for staticky clothes? Ball up a sheet of aluminum foil and toss it in the dryer. This will get rid of static, but it only works for several loads. If you like this method, you can simply replace the ball of foil when you find it's no longer working, though I recommend trying a longer-lasting fix.

Tip #10: Shake Out Your Clothes

Shaking out your clothes when they're fresh out of the dryer is a quick way to reduce static buildup and make the folding process more enjoyable.

Tip #11: Put on Lotion Prior to Folding Clothes

I accidentally discovered one afternoon that by putting lotion on my hands before folding and putting away the laundry, I was able to eliminate a great deal of static cling from our clothes. If you try this method, you should only use a small amount of lotion to avoid transferring it to your clothes.

Tip #12: Spray Troublesome Items With Hair Spray

As a last-ditch effort to fix the static on your clothes, on your furniture, in your bed, and in your hair, hair spray might just do the trick. You’d think that hair spray would make everything sticky, but instead, it kind of seals in the static so it isn’t a problem.

Tip #13: Spray Static Guard

And finally, why not try something professional if static is still a problem for you. So you’ve tried all of the above methods and nothing has worked? Spray static guard (either store-bought or homemade) over the problem areas, and this should fix it for you.

If you want to avoid staticky hair in winter, frequent deep conditioning is essential.

If you want to avoid staticky hair in winter, frequent deep conditioning is essential.

How to Get Rid of Static in Your Hair (5 Tips)

There's nothing like taking off your hat to reveal a staticky do. Here are some simple ways to keep your hair static-free this winter.

Tip #1: Condition Regularly

Using a moisturizing conditioner is essential during winter, not only for the general health of your hair, but also to reduce static! In addition to regular conditioning, you should do a deep-conditioning hair mask once every two weeks throughout the season.

Tip #2: Use a Boar-Bristle Brush

Just like synthetic clothes generate more static, so do hairbrushes with synthetic bristles. Using a boar-bristle brush is a great natural alternative that can significantly reduce static (not to mention frizziness!).

Tip #3: Use Hairspray or Leave-In Conditioner

For an extra static-fighting boost, spray your brush's bristles with a light coat of hairspray or leave-in conditioner before brushing.

Tip 4: Use Serums and Oils

Conditioning in the shower just isn't enough, sometimes. If your hair is still feeling staticky after trying these other tips, consider using products like silicone-based serums and conditioning oils to add an extra barrier against static buildup.

Tip #5: Avoid Wool or Synthetic Hats

Both of these options generate much more friction (and therefore much more static) than cotton, cashmere, or silk alternatives.