Build a Raised Bed Garden Quick, Easy, Cheap

Updated on March 6, 2017
Patsybell profile image

I inherited my love of gardening from mother and grandmother. I am a garden blogger, freelance writer, and Master Gardener emeritus.

The variety of shapes and designs available in concrete blocks may surprise you. Get creative.
The variety of shapes and designs available in concrete blocks may surprise you. Get creative. | Source

Build a 4' x 4' Concrete Block Raised Bed

Build a layered bed and fill with good garden soil.

Use concrete blocks to build a raised bed. It's quick, easy, lasts forever.

A 4' x 4' raised bed is big enough to grow all the produce to make fresh spaghetti sauce and freeze or can a few jars for winter.

Details: The blocks are 7" wide and 9 " long, so, the bed will not be 4' x 4'. The block bed is 55" long. That works out to about 4 1/2'.

That sounds OK, but the interior garden space is 3 1/3' or, about 40" wide on the inside. It is slightly less space than wooden frame raised bed that was replaced.

Start filling the bed with layers of newsprint. The paper smothers any weed or grass seed. Then, we added the rotting boards from the raised bed that was replaced.

The purpose of the newspaper and cardboard is to block grass and weeds. We added the rotting lumber simply to recycle.
The purpose of the newspaper and cardboard is to block grass and weeds. We added the rotting lumber simply to recycle. | Source

Filling the Raised Bed

First, cover the ground to kill any grass and discourage weed seeds.

This newspaper or newsprint layer can also be recycled office paper or cardboard. The important thing is to overlay the paper or cardboard. Make sure the materials overlap.

If using paper, make sure to have several layers. Use what you have, even a thick layer of shredded paper will work. Water down the paper.

Next, layer brown and green materials as you would when making a compost pile.

Add more "brown" carbon rich materials than green. To use "green" nitrogen rich materials, apply thin layers of wet food and cover with dry materials.

If all this crazy layering is like making lasangne and taking too much of your precious time, mix everything together in your wheelbarrow and dump it in the raised bed. Use the coarsest materials on bottom. Top with you premium soil to get plants off to a good start.

Hauling all these blocks is a heavy job. It may take two trips in small cars.
Hauling all these blocks is a heavy job. It may take two trips in small cars. | Source

Green and Brown Compost Explained

Layer green and brown materials in the raised bed like you would when building a compost pile.

"Brown" carbon rich materials are shredded leaves, wood ash, straw, sawdust, shredded newspaper and wood chips.

"Green" nitrogen materials are fresh or green materials such as kitchen scraps, coffee grounds, melon rinds and corn cobs. Add apple cores, eggshells, vegetable peels and that scary green thing in the back of the crisper drawer.

Grass clippings contain as much nitrogen as manure. A bed is best built a year ahead of using it. Start in the late summer and fall, when there is an abundance vegetable scraps, grass, leaves.

Keep a covered container for food discards in the kitchen during canning and preserving season. Ask coffee shops for grounds. Use the discards when cleaning your hair brush, dryer lent, paper towels, cardboard egg cartons and nut shells.

Build It, Fill It, Plant It

If you are building a bed for immediate use, start the same way, with thick layers of paper, cardboard, shredded office paper then, water. I am replacing a bed that had good garden soil. That soil will go back into the new concrete block bed. I have compost and shredded leaves to mix in.

Starting from ground zero, use about 40% peat or core. Core has a few more nutrients, holds more water and is less acid. Add moistened Canadian sphagnum peat moss or core into the raised bed. Stir in a combination of bagged topsoil, animal manure, sand, perlite, and vermiculite.

If you do use some garden soil, sterilize it first. This will keep you from transferring soil borne weed seed, insects and disease into your new raised bed garden. Bake soil at 200° F on cookie sheets for 20 minutes, stirring once about halfway through.

Top the bed with your best enriched gardening soil for planting.

Enrich your "new soil" with a slow release fertilizer. Or, incorporate (N) "Nitrogen", (P) "Phosphorus" or (K) "Potassium", by adding (N) blood meal, (P) bone meal, and (K) greensand.

Bagged and Soiless Garden Soil, Bad Paperback Books

Materials that would normally be used to make potting mix, can also be added to a raised bed. Additions to the soil include peat moss, vermiculite, sand, perlite, core or compost.

Soil supplements are used to hold moisture, making the water available to the plants. These materials can lighten and aerate soil. Clay soil can benefit most from materials that hold moisture and lighten the growing medium.

Coir is being marketed as a replacement for peat and as a soil amendment. It will also lighten up garden soil in raised beds or containers. Like peat, it holds moisture in the soil and improves drainage.

Coconut husks, or coir is a renewable resource. Peat comes out of bogs that took millions of years to create and is rapidly being depleted. Technically peat is a renewable resource, but few of us have a million years to wait.

Bury food scraps, shredded paper, dust bunnies and drier lint while building the block bed. Be creative. Suitable organic matter includes those sad limp green things in the crisper and old, holey cotton socks.

Invite pollinators by planting things like nasturtium. Fill empty garden spaces with herbs and flowers to keep weeds out and attract pollinators.
Invite pollinators by planting things like nasturtium. Fill empty garden spaces with herbs and flowers to keep weeds out and attract pollinators. | Source

5" Square Containers

Nasturtium, "Cup of Sun" tumbles over the edge of the raised bed. Flowers in the garden attract pollinators and cover soil to prevent weeds.

I think the border of 5" squares are a bonus. Will the little 5" squares will be hotter or cooler than the raised bed? I will experiment with a raised bed bordered with herbs.

I'll try the small "Spicy Globe"* basil plants and little clumps of chives, parsley, chervil, cilantro, cutting celery, or the small "Signet Starfire"* marigold.

Little plants for 5" x 5" spaces

perennial herbs
annual herbs
flowers
thyme
chervil
marigold
chives
parsley
dwarf daffodils
tarragon
cilantro
calendula
Keep little plants spaces well weeded so they don't have to compete with weeds for water and nutrients.

No-Till Gardening

The best reason I can think of for building a raised bed garden: you will never have to till again.

Questions & Answers

    Comments

    Submit a Comment

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      Right you are, coffee grounds are a great nitrogen source, great for composting. They can be added directly to garden as well.

      Egg shells are more like a slow release calcium source, don't count on it for an immediate solution for calcium deficient soil. I would love to see your cinder block beds.

    • kimbrewaa profile image

      kimbrewaa 

      3 years ago

      I actually just put in two cinder block beds...great space and cheap too. I salvaged most of them from an abandoned house so yay me! Lol...but i think you may need to research your browns and greens again. Coffee grounds and spent tea bags are high nitrogen sources. They are great for composting piles...heats it up quick. Egg shells are a high source of calcium. These are great when you have a worm bin...aiding in digestion and reproduction. Great hub though!

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      Favored, It would be a cute herb garden. Edible flowers, calendula, marigold, nasturtium will add color and attract pollinators. Have fun.

    • favored profile image

      Fay Favored 

      3 years ago from USA

      OK, thanks. Might have to do this for a smaller bed like herbs. I can manage that myself. Thanks Patsybell.

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      SusanDeppner, It is amazing how much food you can get in a small garden. I actually get more food from the small space, raised beds. The garden season is extended, intensive gardening and succession planting. Happy gardening!

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      Favored, I do not suggest 3 high concrete blocks because of ground shifts and unstable garden soil. These heavy blocks could really hurt or scrape you up if they fall over.

      I thought I would add a level, but after seeing how much they shifted over the winter, I changed my mind. It is easy to level up one layer in the spring.

      A single layer will give you all the benefits of raised beds.

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 

      3 years ago from Arkansas USA

      I really like this idea! How fun to use the small square areas for herbs or small flowers. I'm hoping to add a second raised bed next year (I'm a very small-scale gardener) and this just might be the perfect plan. Thanks so much for the inspiration!

    • favored profile image

      Fay Favored 

      3 years ago from USA

      I'm looking to raise our garden bed and was thinking about going higher with the blocks. Do you think they would be sturdy if I went 3 high? My husband can't do all the labor we had before so I need to come up with something that works for him.

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      Glad to see you recycle. Thank you for reading my hubs

    • profile image

      jeff1947 

      3 years ago

      Now I can finally use all the leftover cinder blocks that used to be a book case

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      You made my day. Thank you for reading my hubs. I have both wood and concrete raised beds. The wood can be made higher or deeper. Blocks are not as safe or successful. Do you grow tomatoes in the 4x4?

    • profile image

      twodawgs 

      3 years ago

      Huh - cinder blocks, why didn't I think of that? I have a few 4'x4' boxes I've already built, but I may try the cinder blocks in another location. Lots of good info here, thanks!

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      3 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      PegCole17, you can just dig a hole in you garden and bury shredded paper. Or, it makes great water saving, weed choking mulch. Thank you for reading my hubs. I appreciate it.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 

      3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      What a great idea to use paper shredding to line the garden bed. I have an abundance of that available. Thanks for these useful tips for small gardens.

    • OldRoses profile image

      Caren White 

      4 years ago from Franklin Park, NJ

      Concrete blocks make great raised beds. The "holes" are where you can pop in your herbs. Good tip to layer the bottom to keep weeds from coming up. Voted up!

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      DDE , thank you, you are kind. I would love to see your garden, when you do get around to building one. Raised beds give us a jump ahead on the gardening season, some times weeks ahead of our fellow gardeners.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 

      4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Great ideas for building a raised garden so simple and well put together. I enjoy reading garden tips and suggestions this one sounds helpful and convenient.

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      MsDora , Any way I can help! I love sharing my passion. You can ask me any garden related questions. Love to help.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Weithers 

      4 years ago from The Caribbean

      Patsy, there is hope that you will make gardener out of me. This is very useful. Thank you.

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      I love hearing about other peoples joy in gardening. Thanks for reading my hubs. If you ever havegarden related questions, please ask.

    • thumbi7 profile image

      JR Krishna 

      4 years ago from India

      I like anything about gardening.

      Your idea of preparing a raised garden bed is excellent

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 

      4 years ago from The Beautiful South

      This is great Patsy and I will start putting this in order this weekend if it doesn't turn cold again! Can't wait for that global warming! lol Up and sharing.

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      Faith Reaper , You make my day. Those blocks are heavy. Take it easy and don't push yourself while you tote these concrete blocks. If you do get this done this spring, I'd live to see a photo. Thank you for your kind words.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 

      4 years ago from southern USA

      Another excellent hub here as to building a raised bed! I like the quick and easy part too. You have given clear instructions and I may give this a try!

      Up and more and sharing

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

    • Patsybell profile imageAUTHOR

      Patsy Bell Hobson 

      4 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

      Thank you. healthy meals. I think we should be working together Me growing and You preparing tomatoes.

      Layering plant materials and making compost is like free fertilizer for you garden.

    • healthy meals profile image

      healthy meals 

      4 years ago from Europe

      I've seen that layering a few nights ago on a gardening tv program, seems to be very effective. I am happy I found your hub and had some of the green and brown compost terms explained.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, dengarden.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://dengarden.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)