How to Plant a Quick and Easy Garden in Bags of Soil Without Digging

Updated on June 20, 2017
Gina Welds-Hulse profile image

In addition to being a certified herbalist and aromatherapy consultant, Gina finds the unrelenting allure of gardening very strong.

Peppers, Swiss Chard, Watermelon, and Various Herbs Planted in Bags of Soil and Framed by an Old Bed Frame
Peppers, Swiss Chard, Watermelon, and Various Herbs Planted in Bags of Soil and Framed by an Old Bed Frame | Source

I May Have Found the Easiest Way Ever to Plant Vegetables!

Considering that most gardeners don't have perfect soil, vegetable garden preparation requires tilling the soil, removing weeds, and adding fertilizer and organic matter. However, growing vegetables in bags of potting soil eliminates all this preparation work.

Instead of doing a lot of backbreaking work, you simply:

  1. Purchase bags of potting/vegetable/planting soil.
  2. Place them flat on top of wet newspaper or right on the ground in your yard or balcony.
  3. Poke some holes in the bottom for drainage.
  4. Cut off the top of the bag, leaving a 2-inch border.
  5. Plant your vegetables right in the bag!

Benefits of Growing Directly in Bags of Soil

  • It's quick, easy and convenient because there's no digging
  • a great way to grow vegetables for those who have busy schedules
  • great for those with limited garden space
  • great for those in apartments
  • great for teaching children to garden
  • great for those with poor soil
  • convenient because bagged potting soil is pasteurized to kill weed seeds
  • makes weeding a breeze
  • convenient because you can plant seeds right into the soil
  • topsoil bags will smother the grass underneath
  • bags eliminate seedling-killing cutworms
  • this method is weeds-free (or very few weeds)
  • You can get started on bag gardening in no time. At the end of the growing season, you can gather up the plastic bags and work their contents into permanent beds, or just lay down a new batch of bags.

In addition to the above-mentioned reasons to garden this way is that the bag-garden can be created on a raised surface (such as a table) with drainage holes. This is great if you have a chronic illness and trouble with bending, limited mobility, or limited range of motion.

Gather Your Materials

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver or something to punch drainage holes
  • Utility knife or scissors
  • Fertilizer
  • Seeds or seedlings
  • Bags of top soil
  • Mulch (optional)

A Quick Overview of the Steps

Step 1. Choose your soil.

Step 2. Place the bag in a sunny location, or the appropriate location for your garden.

Step 3. Put some drainage holes in the bottom of the bags.

Step 4. Cut the opening in the top of the bag.

Step 5. Plant your seeds or seedling.

A Step-By-Step Walkthrough

Step 1. Choose your soil.

Choose whatever floats your boat. Some plants do better in different kinds of soil. Ordinary bagged “topsoil” or inexpensive “tree and shrub planting mix” will do quite nicely.

Step 2. Poke drainage holes in the bottom of the bag.

Use a screwdriver to punch some holes. Plant roots will use these holes to grow down into the soil below the bags and to allow for drainage.
Use a screwdriver to punch some holes. Plant roots will use these holes to grow down into the soil below the bags and to allow for drainage. | Source

Step 3. Find a nice, sunny spot.

Sun is important for plants to grow.

Step 4. Use a utility knife to cut out a large, rectangular window on the upper surface of each bag.

Leave a two inch border to keep the soil supported on all sides.
Leave a two inch border to keep the soil supported on all sides. | Source

Step 5. Break up and wet the soil, then plant the seeds or seedlings.

Break up the soil and water it before planting.
Break up the soil and water it before planting. | Source

What Should I Plant?

What Can I Grow In Soil Bags?

Any plant that does well in large containers will do well in a garden soil bag.

  • cherry tomatoes
  • bush beans
  • lettuce
  • cucumbers
  • kale
  • squash
  • cucumbers
  • kohlrabi
  • Swiss chard
  • and literally any plant that doesn’t require deep rooting.

Use Egg Cartons for Seedlings

I started these green beans in recycled egg cartons.
I started these green beans in recycled egg cartons. | Source
Snow peas.
Snow peas. | Source

How Can I Grow a Deep Rooting Plant in a Bag of Soil?

  • Stand potting soil bags upright to plant deep-rooted plants such as tomatoes.
  • Limit the plants to one plant per bag.
  • Push 1/4-inch dowel rods or other support beams into the potting soil without puncturing the bag, leaving 3 to 4 feet of rod sticking out of the bag to stake tomato plants.
  • If you have trouble setting the bags upright, use thicker stakes and push them through the bag and at least 1 foot deep in the soil to hold the bag in place while providing stakes for the plants.

More Pictures and Ideas

Plant your seedlings.
Plant your seedlings. | Source
Small holes are cut into the bags for each seedling.
Small holes are cut into the bags for each seedling. | Source
Make sure your bag is in an area where it gets the required light. Make a trellis, if necessary.
Make sure your bag is in an area where it gets the required light. Make a trellis, if necessary. | Source
I planted celery, fennel, romaine lettuce, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and bok choy in cored concrete blocks.
I planted celery, fennel, romaine lettuce, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and bok choy in cored concrete blocks. | Source

Have you grown a vegetable garden using this method?

See results

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 Gina Welds Hulse

    Comments

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      • bravewarrior profile image

        Shauna L Bowling 

        13 months ago from Central Florida

        This is brilliant, Gina! I love all the different containers you use for your garden. The potting soil bag method seems ideal for all the reasons you state in this article.

        Great information!

      • always exploring profile image

        Ruby Jean Richert 

        13 months ago from Southern Illinois

        This is a totally new concept for planting. I have used egg cartons but never soil bags. Thanks for sharing...

      • Spanish Food profile image

        Lena Durante 

        13 months ago from San Francisco Bay Area

        This is a great idea, especially for people who live in places where the soil is contaminated. A few years ago the EPA did a cleanup in my neighborhood (which has had heavy industrial use), but before that I was limited to container gardening for my food. I wish I'd had this tip back then!

      • profile image

        S Maree 

        14 months ago

        Thank you! That sounds like a great idea!

      • Gina Welds-Hulse profile imageAUTHOR

        Gina Welds Hulse 

        14 months ago from Rockledge, Florida

        S Maree, I guess you're referring to garden cress and not watercress. Garden cress is a cool weather crop, so it should be planted in early Spring, as early as 4-6 weeks before the last frost. Cress is quick growing from seed; it will be ready for harvest 15 to 20 days after sowing. Sow successive crops until mid summer. Sow cress again in early autumn for autumn and winter harvest. If you grow cress in the bags do not put too many holes in for drainage, as cress thrive in damp soil. Do not let the soil dry out. Hope that helps.

      • profile image

        S Maree 

        14 months ago

        Thank you for these great ideas! I have cinder blocks that need a purpose. Lettuce & chard sounds very nice! Any ideas about cress? Thank you!

      • profile image

        Amos DM Mashigo 

        14 months ago from 2783 Dakota Street Evaton West 1984

        Planting in bags is indeed a great idea that never came to my mind before. I am really thankful for this wonderful piece of advice.

        I will indeed start growing my veggies using this system which would be quite beneficial to me in our area where weeds are a big problem to gardening.

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