How to Design a Simple Garden Plan

Updated on July 28, 2017

Design a Simple, Beautiful Garden Landscape

My son in front of our zone 5 garden: hostas, astilbe and daylilies grow in a lush front border.
My son in front of our zone 5 garden: hostas, astilbe and daylilies grow in a lush front border. | Source

Determine Garden Location and Exposure

Before choosing plants or designing your garden plan, go out to your yard and observe the proposed garden location throughout the day. Is the site in full sun? Is the area heavily shaded throughout the day? Is it exposed to high winds? Is it next to a road where salt from snowplows might affect plant growth?

The plants and overall design will be influenced by the amount of sun your garden site receives each day. Plants also vary considerably with regard to water needs: some plants require a lot of water, while others will die if they have “wet feet.” Observe your garden site for moisture levels.

The soil pH will also affect plant growth. Some plants, like roses, prefer alkaline soil. Other plants, like rhododendrons, prefer acidic soil. When designing a garden, realize that some plants will not be good companions due to their different requirements! A soil test kit can be purchased at any garden supply store – test your soil to determine its native pH. If you want to acidify the soil, coffee grounds can be added to decrease the soil pH. Add lime to increase soil pH.

Plants for Different Garden Exposures

Plant
Exposure
Water Requirements
Soil pH
Deer Resistant
Hosta
Shade
Average
6.5-7.5
No
Astilbe
Shade-Part Sun
Average
6.0-7.0
Yes
Japanese Painted Fern
Shade
Average
5.0-7.5
Yes
Foamflower
Shade
Average
6.6-7.5
Yes
Daffodils
Sun
Average
6.5-7.0
Yes
Daylilies
Sun
Average
6.5-7.0
No
Peonies
Sun
Average
6.5-7.0
Yes
Roses
Sun
Average
6.5-7.0
No
Hydrangea
Part Shade
Average
5.0-6.2
Yes
Liatris
Sun
Average
5.0-6.7
Yes

Daylilies Offer Gorgeous Summer Blooms

Daylilies come in dormant, semi-evergreen, and evergreen varieties. Choose the right type for your landscape.
Daylilies come in dormant, semi-evergreen, and evergreen varieties. Choose the right type for your landscape. | Source

Choose Plants Suitable to Your Zone

Plant choices will vary depending on where you live: the same plants that thrive in Georgia would not survive the winters in Minnesota. Likewise, some plants do better with a hard frost and would not thrive in southern locations.

The USDA provides a map of gardening zones: check your location on the map and choose plants listed as suitable for your zone. Plants from warmer zones may be grown as annuals in colder zones: these plants will die in the winter and won’t return the following year unless stored indoors during the winter months.

Plant Groupings and Height

In general, place plants in odd groupings (3 or 5 plants together). Create a repeating pattern throughout the garden: this helps tie a long border or front yard landscape together. Tall plants should be placed at the back of a garden that backs up to a house, or in the middle of an island garden. Short plants should be placed at the edges.

Check the labels for all plants to determine their full height and breadth. A new garden may look a little sparse at first, but the plants will fill out over time. Planting young plants too close together results in overcrowding and plants may have to be moved or rearranged at a later date if planted too close together.

Adding a specimen plant, like a weeping cherry tree or Japanese Maple, can set a theme and add a dramatic element to the garden

Overlapping Flowering Times

Gardens in the southern states accommodate plants that flower nearly year-round. Annual plants like geraniums, daylilies, and agapanthus will flower throughout most of the year. Gardeners in the northern states often plant perennials which flower for only a few weeks of the year.

There are many ways to achieve blooms throughout the growing season – selecting plants with different bloom times will ensure the garden always has a few blooms at any given time. Under-planting perennials with bulbs is another way to achieve a long flowering season. For example, daffodils and lilies may be planted under daylilies. The daffodils will bloom first, and the fading foliage will be hidden by the emerging daylilies. The daylilies will bloom in June, and the lilies will bloom in July. This planting scenario gives the garden three months of color in the same garden section.

Some “reblooming” perennials have been developed. These perennials generally bloom at least twice: reblooming iris, lilacs, and daylilies are now commonplace in modern gardens.

Adding annuals to the garden also allows for color throughout the growing season. Begonias, geraniums, impatiens, and marigolds will add a burst of color from the time of planting to the first hard frost.

Plant Suggestions for Overlapping Bloom Times

Plant
Bloom Time
Zones
Hellebore
Early Spring
4a-9b
Witch Hazel
Early Spring
3-9
Forsythia
Early Spring
5-9
Allium
Spring
3-9
Lilac
Spring
3-7
Daylilies
Early Summer
4-9
Hydrangea
Summer
3-9
Oriental Lilies
Summer
3-8
Liatris
Summer
4-9
Crocosmia
Late Summer
5-9
Sedum
Fall
3-9
Chysanthemums
Fall
3-9

Planting for Color in All Seasons

Click thumbnail to view full-size
These alliums are planted among daylilies. When the allium foliage is fading, it will be hidden by the daylily leaves.Chrysanthemums flower in late summer or early fall.Lilies flower in the summer months, adding beauty and a wonderful scent to the garden.Add plants like evergreens for winter interest: these pine trees look beautiful when covered in snow.Crocus bloom in early spring, and add some beautiful color to an otherwise gray landscape.
These alliums are planted among daylilies. When the allium foliage is fading, it will be hidden by the daylily leaves.
These alliums are planted among daylilies. When the allium foliage is fading, it will be hidden by the daylily leaves. | Source
Chrysanthemums flower in late summer or early fall.
Chrysanthemums flower in late summer or early fall. | Source
Lilies flower in the summer months, adding beauty and a wonderful scent to the garden.
Lilies flower in the summer months, adding beauty and a wonderful scent to the garden. | Source
Add plants like evergreens for winter interest: these pine trees look beautiful when covered in snow.
Add plants like evergreens for winter interest: these pine trees look beautiful when covered in snow. | Source
Crocus bloom in early spring, and add some beautiful color to an otherwise gray landscape.
Crocus bloom in early spring, and add some beautiful color to an otherwise gray landscape. | Source

Gardening in Four Seasons

Spring

The spring garden is often filled with flowers – from bulbs to early blooming perennials. Make the most of this season by under-planting bulbs beneath perennials and adding a spring-blooming specimen tree (like a Magnolia Stella or weeping cherry) to the garden.

Summer

The summer garden may suffer from heat and lack of water. Plant lilies, liatris, and annual plants to see this season through. Look to foliage for color, too: coleus (an annual) provides an amazing burst of color to the summer garden. Hostas and coral bells come in many variegated shades. Annual plants like elephant ears can add a dramatic, tropical look to the summer garden.

Fall

Sedums and chrysanthemums bloom in the late summer and early fall season. Grasses are a wonderful addition to the garden, as their seed heads are as beautiful as some flowers and add both color and texture to the landscape. Deciduous bushes like Burning Bush add brilliant scarlet leaves to enhance the fall garden.

Winter

Add interest to the winter garden with plants that have interesting bark texture, color, and with garden ornaments.

River Birch has a beautiful, peeling bark that stands out against the winter landscape. Corkscrew Hazel has an unusual branch structure that adds winter interest. Add a gazing ball, garden benches, or statues to enhance the winter landscape.

Part Shade Garden Plan

This garden plan uses hydrangeas, hostas, and lamium for a part-shade location.
This garden plan uses hydrangeas, hostas, and lamium for a part-shade location. | Source

Free Garden Plan: Part Shade

This garden plan utilizes three main plants: hydrangea, hosta, and lamium.

Endless Summer hydrangea is a beautiful flowering plant that produces blooms all summer long. The flower color will be pink or blue, depending on the acidity of the soil. To encourage blue blooms, maintain an acid soil - for pink, add small amounts of lime to raise the soil pH. This plant will grow to 3-5 feet in height and has the same breadth. The foliage turns bronze in the fall: this hydrangea is suitable for zones 4-9.

Hosta Guacamole has an absolutely beautiful chartreuse foliage. It grows 1-3 feet in height and has beautiful flower spikes in mid-summer. Unlike most hostas, Guacamole blooms with fragrant flowers. Its large green leaves contrast beautifully with the hydrangea.

Lamium is a low-growing ground cover for shady locations. It grows 6-8 inches tall and produces pink flowers throughout the growing season. The foliage is silvery and really lights up shady locations.

Free Butterfly Garden Plan

This garden island will attract butterflies in droves. Buddleia (butterfly bush), purple coneflower, verbena, rudbeckia, and liatris are all loved by adult butterflies.
This garden island will attract butterflies in droves. Buddleia (butterfly bush), purple coneflower, verbena, rudbeckia, and liatris are all loved by adult butterflies. | Source

Sample Garden Plan: Butterfly Garden Island

Attracting butterflies to the garden is simple, and the flowers that attract butterflies are vibrant and beautiful. This garden plan uses the following plants:

Buddleia Black Knight (also known as Butterfly Bush): This large, central shrub is filled with dark purple blossoms in the summer. Bloom time can be prolonged by cutting off faded flowers. This bush is approximately 6' tall by 4' wide, and is suited to zones 5-9. Butterfly Bush may die back over the winter, but will rebound in the spring. Like all the other plants in this plan, this shrub requires full sun. Buddleia will attract adult swallowtail butterflies and monarch butterflies, among other species.

Purple Coneflower (echinacea purpurea) is 2-3' tall and about 1' wide. This gorgeous perennial is hardy in zones 3-9 and attracts adult butterflies in addition to songbirds. It is also deer resistant!

Rudbeckia (also known as black-eyed Susan) is 2-3' tall and features deep golden flowers. Space plants 2' apart and watch their rapid growth throughout the summer - rudbeckia attracts adult butterflies and birds. Rudbeckia is hardy in zones 4-8.

Liatris Spicata (also called Blazing Star) is 2 feet tall and about 10" wide, making it a tall, narrow plant. Butterflies and bees are drawn to its spikes of purple flowers in the mid summer. Liatris is hardy in zones 3-10.

Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is easy to grow from seed, but does not transplant well due to the formation of a long taproot. This plant has a long blooming season (from May to September) and features brilliant orange flowers. The plants are 10-24" tall, slightly smaller than the Liatris. Butterfly weed attracts adult butterflies and also supports Monarch and Queen caterpillars. Grow this plant in zones 4-9.

Verbena "Blue Princess" is a hardy perennial ground cover that grows to a height of 6". This plant produces beautiful, blue-purple flowers that are highly fragrant. Grow in zones 7-10, or in colder areas as an annual.

Questions & Answers

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        13 months ago from Western New York

        Thanks, Alex! It is really fun to watch a garden come to life each spring. Tell us how your landscaping design turns out!

      • profile image

        Alex Harris 

        13 months ago

        Nice post, very useful. I will surely try out some of these ideas on my landscaping project. Thanks for sharing!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        20 months ago from Western New York

        Thanks, Peggy! I love our front garden in June and July. Our summer is extremely short in Western NY, so we appreciate every day of sunshine and bright green plants!

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        2 years ago from Houston, Texas

        This is the time of year gardeners are planning their gardens. You certainly have a lush border with so many pretty plants in that first photo. Your son dressed in that bright red shirt makes a nice color contrast. :)

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        3 years ago from Western New York

        We are still trying to get topsoil for our vegetable garden (raised) bed - we need the rain to stop so we can get a delivery!

      • Kristen Howe profile image

        Kristen Howe 

        3 years ago from Northeast Ohio

        Oh Leah, I know the feeling. My patio container garden have sprouted leaves and no flowers yet. I'm glad they're annual flowers though. Keep me posted!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        3 years ago from Western New York

        I have a new raised garden bed (circular, with a keyhole cut-out) and am waiting to get dirt to fill it so I can transfer my seedlings. I wish we had a longer growing season here, Kristen!

      • Kristen Howe profile image

        Kristen Howe 

        3 years ago from Northeast Ohio

        Leah, I agree with you there. My brother and SIL has a garden at their home, while I'm waiting for my flowers to blooms (some are sprouting). I would love to have an indoor herb and veggie garden, too.

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        3 years ago from Western New York

        I really love gardening, Kristen - it is such a worthwhile hobby (with the added advantage of providing vegetables for my family in the late summer season). There is nothing better than coming home to a riot of colorful flowers!

      • Kristen Howe profile image

        Kristen Howe 

        3 years ago from Northeast Ohio

        Leah, this is a great gardening guide for any gardening level. Very useful with plenty of good tips. Voted up!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        3 years ago from Western New York

        Thanks, Perspycacious! I love gardening. I hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving, too!

      • Perspycacious profile image

        Demas W Jasper 

        3 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

        Fine Hub. Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        Oh, ignugent17, the deer are the bane of my existence! We use Liquid Fence to keep them away from our vegetable gardens, but I had a deer eat all of my Stargazer lilies just before they bloomed! I nearly cried. They don't touch the astilbe, thank goodness!

      • profile image

        ignugent17 

        6 years ago

        Wow ! This is a very informative hub. Now I have an idea which flowering plant to plant next year especially about the deer. Thanks leahlefler.

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        I absolutely love gardening. I'd much rather be outside planting something than inside baking something! We have a few vegetable gardens, too (the kids tend those), but I love my flower beds the most. I hope you get the opportunity to plan your own garden soon - even if it is just a small container garden!

      • Simone Smith profile image

        Simone Haruko Smith 

        6 years ago from San Francisco

        This Hub is incredible!!! Your photos and diagrams are so helpful, as are the tables! If I ever have the opportunity to start my own garden, I think I'll just print out this Hub and use it as my go-to starting guide. Hmm... I hope I'll have that opportunity soon! Planning the layout and choosing plants sounds like a lot of fun.

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        Oh, Zone 2 must be so limiting! I suppose you really focus on plants that have good form in the winter - I know maples can survive in low level zones. I don't think I'll complain about our six months of snow ever again, brsmom! I hope you enjoy your (short) summer!

      • brsmom68 profile image

        Diane Ziomek 

        6 years ago from Alberta, Canada

        I love gardening! I live in Zone 2 so my plant choices are often limited, especially where annuals are concerned. Many need several weeks of frost-free temperatures, and we often see frost the first week of June. It can return as early as August, accompanied by several inches of snow.

        Voted up and useful - you have a remarkable Hub!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        I absolutely love gardening, Om. I usually pick a few plants and try to repeat the pattern, including different textures and foliage colors. Thanks for your comment - I think my little guy is adorable, but I'm obviously quite biased!

      • Om Paramapoonya profile image

        Om Paramapoonya 

        6 years ago

        Thanks for sharing these garden planning tips! Your advice is very detailed and easy to follow. And that picture of your son in front of the garden is so adorable!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        Thanks, Angelo! I'm in the process of designing a deer proof, shade friendly garden for the backyard around our decks. I love the growing season!

      • Angelo52 profile image

        Angelo52 

        6 years ago from Central Florida

        Great garden ideas. Liked looking them over. Voted up

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        I hope you get a yard (or some place to grow a container garden) some day soon - I find great enjoyment in our yard. We have a small apple orchard, raised bed vegetable gardens, and our "pretty" plants in the front yard. We also get a lot of wildlife - bears, deer, turkey, and foxes are a frequent sight in our yard!

      • lindacee profile image

        Linda Chechar 

        6 years ago from Arizona

        Such wonderful advice. I'm so jealous of your lovely landscaping! Your Hub is such a great reference. I really miss not having a yard. I remember the feeling of satisfaction I'd get looking at all the beautiful plantings and the associated wildlife they attract. Voted up, useful and beautiful!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        Thanks, Riverfish! I really want to get some hydrangeas for our yard. I absolutely love them - they're on my "must buy" list!

      • Riverfish24 profile image

        Riverfish24 

        6 years ago from United States

        Awesome information and guidelines - I hope I can do these someday. You make it sound so do-able!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        Thanks, Cassy! It really fills in during the summer - even without flowers, the foliage is very colorful and lush. Texture and leaf color can add a lot to a garden!

      • CassyLu1981 profile image

        CassyLu1981 

        6 years ago from Spring Lake, NC

        Wow I want a garden like that one day. Will be bookmarking this one and coming back to it often to make sure I can get mine right :) Thanks for sharing! Voted up and useful!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        I don't have any Empress Wu hostas - I'd have to create another island bed to fit them in (they're really big)! I do have Sum and Substance - the lighter green hostas in the first picture are Sum and Substance. I also have Guacamole (love it - light green, big, and it has white, fragrant flowers), Fire and Ice, Diamond Tiara (small hosta), and a few others. I love them all! Honestly, I think I need more acreage just for the gardens I plan, haha!

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        I love our gardens, Robert - especially when they are filled out and lush during the summer! I'm not a big fan of weeding, though!

      • Virtual Treasures profile image

        Kacie Turner 

        6 years ago from Michigan

        Great article! Excellent information. I bought some Empress Wu Hostas this year and I'm excited to see how they do and if they work where I've planted them. Have you tried them? Voted up and awesome!

      • Robert Erich profile image

        Robert Erich 

        6 years ago from California

        An amazing article. My brother and I are working on starting a garden. I will have to refer to this article more in the future.

      • leahlefler profile imageAUTHOR

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        We have a spot in our yard that seems to kill plants - no matter what we plant there! It is close to the house and I think the soil might not be deep enough, so I'm going to amend the soil, raise it up, and try again. We have a deer problem, too, so we are constantly on the lookout for deer resistant plants!

      • krsharp05 profile image

        Kristi Sharp 

        6 years ago from Born in Missouri. Raised in Minnesota.

        This is very helpful. We had our yard professionally landscaped and several plants failed and died the first year. It was disappointing and the company didn't do anything about it. Looking back, I should have researched but I didn't have the time or energy. I'm going to use this information and re-do! Fantastic!

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, dengarden.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://dengarden.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)