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How to Get the Highest Yield and Best Flavor From Tomatoes

Lynn has been a professional organic farmer for the last 35 years and runs a 210-acre farm in Western Colorado with her husband.

My decades of experience with organic farming have led me to a few simple tips for growing the most flavorful, delicious tomatoes.

My decades of experience with organic farming have led me to a few simple tips for growing the most flavorful, delicious tomatoes.

3 Tips for Growing Tasty Tomatoes

Would you like to learn the secrets to the best tomato production and the best flavor? Then you've come to the right place. In this article, I'm going to cover the top three things you can do to get the most production and the best flavor out of your tomatoes.

I've been a professional organic farmer for 35 years, and I've grown a lot of tomatoes. But inevitably, some turned out tastier than others. All that trial and error has led me to three key techniques for growing great-tasting tomatoes (and lots of them).

Choosing the right tomato variety for your taste (and zone) makes a huge difference.

Choosing the right tomato variety for your taste (and zone) makes a huge difference.

1. Choose the Right Variety for You

Number one is variety. There are over 3,600 varieties of tomatoes that I know of. Some are sweet tomatoes, some are salty. Some have more acid in them, some have low acid. I've even grown one that tasted slightly like root beer. Can you believe it? It was so good.

Experiment around with different varieties to get the flavor nuances that you love best. If you're not quite sure where to start, here are 6 tips for choosing the best tomato variety to grow.

Ensuring that your soil has the essential nutrients and trace minerals it needs will help you grow the most delicious veggies.

Ensuring that your soil has the essential nutrients and trace minerals it needs will help you grow the most delicious veggies.

2. Grow Your Tomatoes Organically

I get a lot of funny looks when I say that growing tomatoes organically gives you the best flavor and the healthiest vines, but in my decades of experience, I've found it to be absolutely true.

There are successful organic growers in every country and in all 50 states. So growing organically is really just a skill set, and if you learn the skills, you can grow your whole garden without chemicals.

Why Should You Grow Organically?

When we grow organically, we get soil that is teeming with beneficial microbes that break down the rocks and organic matter and create nutrients to feed the plants. This symbiotic relationship between the plant and the microbes allows the plant to get the 17 essential nutrients that it needs to live up to its full genetic potential. That means flavor and production.

Most chemical fertilizers only give the plant three essential nutrients, and this is not enough to create the depth of flavor that we want in our tomatoes. The secret to that depth is the trace minerals. So if your produce is lacking in flavor, add the trace minerals to your soil.

Letting your tomatoes ripen on the vine ensures that they get all the nutrients they need to provide the best flavor.

Letting your tomatoes ripen on the vine ensures that they get all the nutrients they need to provide the best flavor.

3. Let Your Tomatoes Ripen on the Vine

The plants will put the final nutrients in the tomatoes at the last minute as it's ripening the fruit. So if you leave your tomatoes on the vine until they are fully ripe, you will get the best flavor.

Best of Luck With Your Tomatoes!

Growing tomatoes is so much fun, and eating tomatoes that are bursting with flavor is even more fun. So pick your favorite varieties, grow them organically with trace minerals, and let those tomatoes vine ripen and you will have the best tomato crop ever.

May your garden be easy, fun, productive, and always organic!

Tips for Planning an Organic Tomato Garden

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Lynn Gillespie

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