How to Grow Fuji Apple Trees

Updated on March 12, 2018
Casey White profile image

Dorothy McKenney is a former newspaper reporter turned researcher. Her husband, Mike, is a professional landscape/nature photographer.

They Are Beautiful and Tasty

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Fuji apples are tasty and now you can grow your own.There is a great balance between the sweetness and sourness of the Fuji apple, the  most popular fruit in Japan.  Also, they have a very long shelf life.
Fuji apples are tasty and now you can grow your own.
Fuji apples are tasty and now you can grow your own.
There is a great balance between the sweetness and sourness of the Fuji apple, the  most popular fruit in Japan.  Also, they have a very long shelf life.
There is a great balance between the sweetness and sourness of the Fuji apple, the most popular fruit in Japan. Also, they have a very long shelf life.

Fuji Trees Need to Be Close to Other Apple Trees

Fuji apple trees are not self-fertile and need a pollination partner of a different apple variety close by.

Folks in Washington State Know Apples

At one time we had three apple trees in our backyard but had no idea how to make them produce apples that were actually edible. Later, after moving to Washington state, we learned that if there's one thing they know how to do in Washington, it's growing delicious apples!

About half of all the apples grown in America are grown in Washington state This article will show you how to grow my very favorite apple tree - the Fuji apple, which is about the size of a baseball. They contain about 10% sugar and are tasty, tasty, tasty! Washington state produces around 150,000 tons of Fuji apples each year.

Fuji apples on the tree.  They taste as good as they look!
Fuji apples on the tree. They taste as good as they look!
Fuji apple blossoms.
Fuji apple blossoms.

There Are Two Ways to Grow Fuji Apple Trees

  • The Slow Way - Let me start by saying that if you plant and grow your tree from seeds, you are selecting the slow route, and it could take many years to mature enough to produce fruit. If that's what you want to do, however, this is the way to do it: Keep some apple seeds (10-12 seeds) in the middle of a moistened paper towel. Fold the towel up and place on a saucer in your refrigerator. Check it daily and keep the seeds moist at all times (not wet - moist). If the paper towel is dripping water, it is too wet. In about 7-10 days, your seeds will sprout and you can place them in a container of potting soil. Don't put them outside in the ground until they have sprouted, or you are setting yourself up for disappointment. I like to use Miracle Gro potting soil, and I like to start my trees in a container so I can baby them a little bit while they are growing up.
  • Put your sprouted seeds in potting soil in a one-gallon container and water it to get your seeds settled in. Set it in a sunny window if you want to keep it inside for a while longer, or set the pot outside, close enough to your back door so that you can keep an eye on it. I move my plants that are in containers a lot to afford them the best of whatever the weather is dishing up. If it's sunny, but not steamy hot, set your container out in the sun for several hours a day. If it's raining outside, set your container so that it can only get a little bit of rain instead of a good drenching. After your seed becomes a tiny little tree, you can put it in its permanent home in the yard. Now, be prepared to wait for about 8-10 years because that's how long it will take before your seeds become Fuji apple-producing trees.
  • The Fast (and Best) Way - My best recommendation is to eliminate all of the above steps and buy yourself a healthy, young Fuji apple tree and plant it in the fall when it is in a dormant state. I would still put a young tree in a five-gallon container just to make sure it is growing up properly under my watchful eye (near my house). Sometimes if you plant them out in the back of your yard, they tend to get forgotten.
  • If you decide to start with a young Fuji apple tree, try to find the healthiest one you can with the strongest rootstock. They are usually sold bare-root, so pay more attention to the roots than you do the stems, as it is the rootstock that determines the size your tree will be and its resistance to pests. Keep your roots nice and moist until they are planted. Plant your young tree outside in the fall when it is in a dormant state. (Apple trees are deciduous, so they will lose their leaves in the fall - when the leaves are gone on your young tree, it is ready to be planted). Your apple tree will want four to six hours of sunshine a day (when Mother Nature cooperates), but it will also need a few hundred hours of chilling in temperatures about 35-45 degrees Fahrenheit. The cold temperatures encourage normal growth during the season when the tree is growing and not dormant. If you live in Washington state, Mother Nature knows just what to do for your apples!

Fuji apples originated as a cross between two American apple varieties - the Red Delicious and old Virginia Ralls Genet.

Fuji Apple Trees in Japan

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Looks like they know what they're doing in Japan as well!  These Fuji apple trees look great.  The Fuji is an apple hybrid developed at theTohoku Research Station in Fujisaki, Aomori, Japan, in the late 1930's, and brought to market in 1962.The Fuji is an apple hybrid developed at theTohoku Research Station in Fujisaki, Aomori, Japan, in the late 1930's, and brought to market in 1962.
Looks like they know what they're doing in Japan as well!  These Fuji apple trees look great.  The Fuji is an apple hybrid developed at theTohoku Research Station in Fujisaki, Aomori, Japan, in the late 1930's, and brought to market in 1962.
Looks like they know what they're doing in Japan as well! These Fuji apple trees look great. The Fuji is an apple hybrid developed at theTohoku Research Station in Fujisaki, Aomori, Japan, in the late 1930's, and brought to market in 1962.
The Fuji is an apple hybrid developed at theTohoku Research Station in Fujisaki, Aomori, Japan, in the late 1930's, and brought to market in 1962.
The Fuji is an apple hybrid developed at theTohoku Research Station in Fujisaki, Aomori, Japan, in the late 1930's, and brought to market in 1962. | Source

Check out the great Fuji apple recipes here: https://www.thedailymeal.com/best-recipes/fuji-apple

Tips & Warnings

  • Dig a hole outside large enough to be able to accommodate the rootstock, and spread the roots out to keep them from growing up in a big tangled mess.
  • When you replace the soil on top of the roots, press down enough to ensure that the roots are touching soil in all places.
  • Once planted, water your tree thoroughly and spread mulch around it to aid in moisture retention and to keep the roots safe from severe, cold weather.
  • Fuji apple trees bloom in mid to late Spring.
  • Start making lots of friends and learn to bake apple pies, because when Fuji apple trees start producing fruit, you won't be able to eat them fast enough.

A Fuji apple tree seedling.
A Fuji apple tree seedling.

Questions & Answers

  • I have a Fuji tree that I grew from seed about ten years ago. The good news is that it produces a lot of fruit. The bad news is that they are the size of a cherry. Do you have any thoughts?

    Fuji trees are not self-fertile. You need another apple tree close by for pollination. I would thin the fruit out too and make sure the tree is getting enough water. Check out trees to plant near your Fuji on Google.

  • What apple tree should be planted with a Fuji for pollination?

    Click on this link, which I think explains the choices much better than I could, so I always refer people to it:

    https://www.orangepippintrees.com/pollinationcheck...

© 2011 Mike and Dorothy McKenney

Comments

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    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      3 weeks ago from United States

      I'm sorry, I don't understand.

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      4 weeks ago from United States

      I'm sorry. I don't understand.

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      5 months ago from United States

      I'm going to have to be honest and say that I just don't know, but I suspect you may be right about it. So sorry I couldn't be more help. Perhaps other readers might care to chime in on this question?

    • profile image

      Sonja Hohnhorst 

      5 months ago

      Hi. I have a fuji tree and get a ton of juicy, sweet apples every other year. The only bad thing is that the skin is an odd coloring, a mix of green, red, and dark spots of green scattered. There is a crab apple tree down the road. Would that have anything to do with the look of my apples?

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      6 months ago from United States

      Jack in Illinois: The trees do need to be near another tree and this is a great article telling what the choices are:

      https://www.orangepippintrees.com/pollinationcheck...

    • profile image

      Jack in Illinois 

      6 months ago

      Do fuji trees need another apple tree to produce apples?

    • profile image

      Apple Nut 

      8 months ago

      I assume that everyone knows that apples don't "grow true" from seed. Fuji apple seeds WILL NOT grow true Fuji apples.

    • profile image

      Edonnex 

      9 months ago

      Thanks for this great article.

      How long does it take for the fast approach to mature?

      How much is the cost per the young Fuji apple tree?

      Can it grow in West Africa?

      Thanks.

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      12 months ago from United States

      Cheyenne: I'm not sure I can answer that question, but this is a great article on the question:

      http://sciencing.com/science-projects-apples-seeds...

    • profile image

      Cheyenne arbogast 

      12 months ago

      Are there more seeds in fugi apples or washington apples

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      14 months ago from United States

      Audrey: I would think so. We lived in Arkansas and I had a nice apple tree in my back yard. Read this article that I found:

      https://www.hunker.com/12281660/the-best-fruit-tre...

      Thanks for reading and commenting.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 

      14 months ago from Idyllwild Ca.

      Love Fujis! Enjoyed this hub so filled with wonderful information. Wondering if Nashville, Tn. is ok for growing apples.

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      6 years ago from United States

      Probably so, according to the apple experts up here in Washington state. Maybe, however, you'll be one of the lucky ones and your apples will appear in two years instead of four. Sorry I can't be more encouraging...lol.

    • CarpetDiem profile image

      CarpetDiem 

      6 years ago from Southern California

      Casey,

      Great hub! Where did you get the info that it takes 8-10 years to get an apple when you start from seed? I planted a seed about 4 years ago on a whim. It's a nice little tree now, but no apples yet. Do I really have to wait another 4 years???

    • Casey White profile imageAUTHOR

      Mike and Dorothy McKenney 

      7 years ago from United States

      Thank you very much for stopping by to check out my newest article!

    • souleru profile image

      souleru 

      7 years ago

      Very informative hub!

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