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How to Propagate Pot Geraniums (Pelargoniums) From Cuttings

Rachel is a passionate plantsperson, YouTuber and author living in Ireland. She grows a wide range of hardy subtropical and tropical plants.

'Orange Fizz' geranium cuttings ready for propagation. I just love the zesty orange fragrance from its leaves. I definitely want lots more!

'Orange Fizz' geranium cuttings ready for propagation. I just love the zesty orange fragrance from its leaves. I definitely want lots more!

How to Start Geraniums From Cuttings

Pelargoniums, or pot geraniums, are a really easy plant to propagate in spring, late summer or winter. Here's how!

  1. Choose a vigorous, healthy shoot and remove it from the plant by cutting above a leaf joint. Your cuttings should be between 3 and 4 inches long.
  2. On the shoot you've just removed, make a straight cut just below a leaf joint. (You can discard the plant segment from between the two cuts.)
  3. Remove all the lower leaves and the stipules from your cutting. (Stipules are small, sometimes brown, leaf-like structures at the base of each leaf stalk.) Each cutting needs to have just two or three leaves, just enough so that the plant can continue to photosynthesize and grow; if there are too many leaves, the cutting will lose moisture and die.
  4. If leaves are particularly large, cut them in half.
  5. Remove any flower stems.
  6. Fill a 3-inch pot with free-draining compost. I like using a mix of 50% potting compost and 50% horticultural grit.
  7. Firm your mix down and make some one-inch holes around the edge of the pot (I usually make 6 holes for this 3-inch pot).
  8. Push a cutting into each hole, burying it by a third.
  9. Water the plants sparingly; cuttings should be kept just moist.
  10. Keep your uncovered cuttings—and this is important, uncovered—in a warm, slightly sheltered position (a north-facing windowsill is just ideal).
  11. Keep an eye on the moisture levels, ensuring that they stay damp.

When you see new growth appearing at the top, you know that your cuttings have struck! Happy growing.

More About Geraniums!

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Rachel Darlington

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