Benefits of Eating Loquat Fruits

Updated on June 29, 2018
Turtlewoman profile image

Kim is a board-certified holistic health coach, healthy living and cleanse consultant, and studied under Drs. Andrew Weil and Walter Willet.

Beautiful, ripe loquat fruits.
Beautiful, ripe loquat fruits. | Source

You may have spotted the small, yellow cluster of fruits grown from the gorgeous, exotic-looking trees along the streets of California. Also known as the Japanese plum, the loquat fruit tastes sweet and tangy, with a hint of sour at the same time.

Peel the thin outer layer, and you will be rewarded with the succulent and juicy flesh of the fruit. Picking loquat straight from the loquat tree and eating them raw reminds me of careless warm days of summer.

Not only do they taste delicious and refreshing, there are many health benefits to the loquat fruit.

What Do Loquat Trees Look Like?

The loquat tree (Eriobotrya japonica) can grow up to 30 feet, with their impressive foliage that adds that tropical look to any landscape. Loquat leaves are dark green, with a glossy appearance. Small white flowers provide a sweet subtle fragrance that appears early spring or late winter. The fruits are usually ready to be harvested by March.

I have a smaller loquat tree that is about 10 feet in my garden. Our friendly squirrels also love to compete for the fruits. I have to tie plastic bags around the clusters of fruits to protect them from the squirrels.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
My loquat tree is protected from the squirrels, who also love to eat them. My neighbor's tree is about 20 feet tall! Look at all the luscious fruits!
My loquat tree is protected from the squirrels, who also love to eat them.
My loquat tree is protected from the squirrels, who also love to eat them. | Source
My neighbor's tree is about 20 feet tall! Look at all the luscious fruits!
My neighbor's tree is about 20 feet tall! Look at all the luscious fruits! | Source

What Are the Benefits of Eating Loquat Fruits?

Loquats are extremely helpful for diabetics. My aunt is diabetic and uses the loquat leaves to brew tea, which helps stabilize her blood sugar level.

  • Loquats are rich in soluble fiber due to pectin, which is a soluble dietary fiber found in citrus fruits. Pectin binds to cholesterol in the stomach, and slows glucose absorption by trapping carbohydrates. Pectin also reduces cholesterol levels.
  • Pectin in loquats also helps retain moisture in the colon and protects it from binding to toxic chemicals.
  • Loquats are high in antioxidants. The riper they are, the higher the concentration of antioxidants.
  • They have a high amount of vitamin A (2276 IU per cup).
  • They are also high in potassium and also contain some vitamin B-complexes.
  • Loquats are a good source of minerals, including calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium.
  • They have a low Glycemic Load Index of 4.

According to Dr. Michael Tierra L.Ac., O.M.D. , the loquat leaves are also:

  • "...beneficial to the vital energy of the lungs. It dissolves and expectorates phlegm and alleviates cough. Relieving coughing and vomiting. The flesh promotes the secretion of body fluids and eliminates thirst. The tender leaves are used for various types of coughs but the under side is usually prepared by rubbing the hairs off so they do not irritate the throat."

How to Eat Loquat Fruits

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Not-yet-ripe loquats still in their green stage.These loquats look just about ready to be harvested.Loquats pulled off the vine, ready to be eaten.You can begin by peeling off the skin if you like.Peeling off the skin leaves nothing but tasty fruit (and the pit) left.Discard the pit and enjoy!
Not-yet-ripe loquats still in their green stage.
Not-yet-ripe loquats still in their green stage. | Source
These loquats look just about ready to be harvested.
These loquats look just about ready to be harvested. | Source
Loquats pulled off the vine, ready to be eaten.
Loquats pulled off the vine, ready to be eaten. | Source
You can begin by peeling off the skin if you like.
You can begin by peeling off the skin if you like. | Source
Peeling off the skin leaves nothing but tasty fruit (and the pit) left.
Peeling off the skin leaves nothing but tasty fruit (and the pit) left. | Source
Discard the pit and enjoy!
Discard the pit and enjoy! | Source

Where Can Loquat Trees Be Found?

Although the loquat originated from southeastern China, Japan is actually the leading producer of loquats. Loquat trees are also commonly found in Brazil and Israel. Surprisingly, they are now quite common in California!

In California, you can see them commonly lined along the coastal areas from San Diego to Sacramento. The fruits are now grown in many farm gardens such as Brentwood, California.

The fruits are usually harvested between the months of March to June. Harvesting these fruits can be somewhat labor intensive for farmers, since it is difficult to handle the fragile clusters of fruits. They also have a shorter shelf life. Thus, it limits the loquat fruit as a major commercial fruit.

Disclaimer: The information and reference guides that are provided are intended solely for the general information for the reader. It is not to be used to diagnose health problems or for treatment purposes. Please consult your health care provider for any advice on medications.

Have You Eaten Loquats Before?

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Questions & Answers

    Comments on Loquat Frutis and Loquat Trees

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      • profile image

        Irene 

        5 months ago

        interesting. we do have them all over in California

      • profile image

        william Frinchaboy 

        2 years ago

        I am a gardener, plant scientist, trained in "fruit and vine science " many years ago. I've love loquats since childhood. However, after it is overripe and still on the tree, it gets moldy. Trees are covered with a black powder that start with the fruit. This mold is Aspergillus Flavins and this fungi produces aflatoxins which are very carcinogenic. The cure is to knock off or pick all of the fruit soon after the fruit has become overripe. The mold cannot thrive without moisture and sugars.

      • profile image

        Liaquat khan 

        3 years ago

        Here in Pakistan Loquat trees have started bearing fruit my home rear garden is colourful with Loquat we enjoyed fresh loquat direct from trees during drizzling

      • Turtlewoman profile imageAUTHOR

        Kim Lam 

        5 years ago from California

        anglnwu- Hi! they're so refreshing right? Spring is the prime season too and we have massive loquat trees lined up on every street!

        bhatti- You're so right! We actually do leave some for the squirrels. As you can see we left a few clusters for them haha! Funny thing is...they take a few bites and throw them all on the ground. So wasteful! :-) Thanks for stopping by!

      • profile image

        bhatti 

        5 years ago

        wow nice article. ... i am sitting here in Pakistan, tooo far to taste this fruit from your garden....but please next time don't tie one cluster and leave it for squirrels........ u r so generous to your friends... pls a little show to this tiny nice innocent creature..........GOD Bless u

      • anglnwu profile image

        anglnwu 

        5 years ago

        I never had loquats until a friend gave me some the other day. I must say I love it and that piqued my curiosity. I'm thinking of writing a hub about it but you've covered it so well, I may have to reconsider. Thanks for sharing and rated up.

      • profile image

        amanda 

        5 years ago

        They also grow everywere in florida too and the are good.

      • mecheshier profile image

        mecheshier 

        6 years ago

        You are most welcome

      • Turtlewoman profile imageAUTHOR

        Kim Lam 

        6 years ago from California

        Thanks vellur, mecheshier!

      • mecheshier profile image

        mecheshier 

        6 years ago

        Nice Hub. Great pics and info. Loquats are fabulous if you can find them.

      • Vellur profile image

        Nithya Venkat 

        6 years ago from Dubai

        I would love to try one after reading your hub. Thanks for sharing.

      • Turtlewoman profile imageAUTHOR

        Kim Lam 

        6 years ago from California

        I would send the next jar of Loquat preserves to you...along with a branch of the fresh ones too. :-)

      • cclitgirl profile image

        Cynthia Calhoun 

        6 years ago from Western NC

        I live on the East Coast, so I haven't seen a loquat tree, but I have to tell you that it is INCREDIBLY FUN when you discover something just growing anywhere that you can eat and that is incredibly good for you. Yum!! I'd love to try this. Hmm, someone needs to start making Loquat preserves and ship them east! :D

      • Turtlewoman profile imageAUTHOR

        Kim Lam 

        6 years ago from California

        Sorry to hear that Leah! I think New York's weather is too extreme for loquat trees. Hopefully you can find them the next time you visit CA.

        Thanks for stopping by.

      • leahlefler profile image

        Leah Lefler 

        6 years ago from Western New York

        I grew up in California and am rather sad, because I never tried a loquat! I can't find them in Western NY (and sadly, the trees wouldn't grow here). Great hub!

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