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My Top 10 Favourite Pink Flowers

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I love pottering in the greenhouse and garden and listening to classic rock with my Labradoodle, Florrie.

my-top-10-favourite-pink-flowers

Pink is Florrie Labradoodles’s favourite colour! Pink flamingo and pink monkey are her favourite toys and her favourite scarf is also pink!

my-top-10-favourite-pink-flowers

Florrie Labradoodle Loves Pink!

Florrie spends a great deal of the summer in the garden with her toys. So, to avoid a colour clash, I thought it would be good to grow a range of pink flowering plants!

Here are our top ten favourites!

Sweet Pea

Sweet Pea

1. Sweet Pea

There’s something wonderfully nostalgic about sweet peas. They are the perfect flowering annual. They are easy to grow, they flower continuously and a small bunch can fill a room with scent. Trained onto a wigwam-shaped support of canes, they form an impressive display of fragrant, summer colour in beds and borders. Keep picking them regularly to prolong their flowering season.

Flowering Cherry

Flowering Cherry

2. Cherry Blossom

Similar to the Camellia, blooming cherry blossom trees announce the arrival of spring. There are a number of different sizes and varieties of tree to choose from. Flowers can be single or double and can range in colour from vivid pink to pure white. Cherry blossom season lasts about a month with each individual tree flowering for around one to two weeks. Cherry blossoms are Japan's national flower and stand for renewal and hope.

Hollyhocks

Hollyhocks

3. Hollyhock

Hollyhocks are tall, stately, old fashioned plants. They are best grown against walls or fences where their spectacular flower spikes stand clear above everything else. Their frilly blooms start at the bottom of the spike and slowly work their way up.

Hollyhocks are usually grown as biennials, but self-seed freely. They can be a little susceptible to ‘rust’.

Begonia

Begonia

4. Begonia

Begonias are one of the brightest, ‘showiest’ summer flowers to grow. There are upright varieties for borders and trailing varieties best for hanging baskets and patio containers. They come in a variety of colours - red, yellow, white, as well as pink. Begonias will flower in the shade and their tough leaves are slug resistant which make them a gardeners delight! You can grow them from seed, dry tubers or often the simplest way is to buy a tray of plug plants. They will flower all through the summer right up until the frosts arrive.

Camellia

Camellia

5. Camellia

Camellias are evergreen shrubs and small trees with long dark green shiny leaves. This photo is the pink camellia we have in our garden. It produces a mass of large intricate blooms starting at the end of winter and can flower for a couple of months. They are slow growing, around 10 to 15cm per year and you can get varieties suitable for tubs and containers.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus

6. Hibiscus

In warmer climates, like the Canary Islands, hibiscus is grown as a perennial garden plant and is used as a woody shrub for hedges. I have often holidayed in hotels in Gran Canaria or Fuerteventura and admired the large trumpet shaped flowers used as hedging screens around the hotel.

Back in this country I grow a pink flowered hibiscus in a large pot. It stays indoors over winter and I bring it outside onto the patio once the risk of frosts and cold winds have passed. It is my own little piece of the Canaries!

Fuchsia

Fuchsia

7. Fuchsia

Fuchsias produce masses of pendant, bell-like flowers for months on end from summer to the first severe frosts of winter. They have striking two-tone colours in shades of pink, white and purple. Some are grown as annuals in flower borders and the trailing varieties are particularly popular for hanging baskets.

I grow hardy fuchsias which return year after year as regular as clockwork. The plants you can see behind Florrie are from the ‘Thumb’ family (Tom Thumb, Lady Thumb) and are over twenty years old!

Penstemon

Penstemon

8. Penstemon

Penstemons have tubular late summer flowers similar to a foxglove in a wide range of colours. Their big advantage is that they can grow in quite poor conditions and survive dry, drought-ridden summers yet still flower profusely. Snip off spent flower spikes and you will be rewarded with a second and third flush of flowers. They can be quite hardy but start to get woody after three to five years. They are easy to propagate from cuttings in autumn to replace your stock.

Pinks

Pinks

9. Pinks

Dianthus ‘pinks’ are a delightful little addition to any borders, pots or rock gardens. Their name comes not from the colour pink, but from their frilly edges, as in pinking shears. Many are highly scented similar to cloves.

Rose

Rose

10. Rose

Everybody loves a rose! They come in a variety of forms, from climbing roses to miniature rose plants, flowering mainly in early summer and autumn.

I must admit I am not a fan of their sharp thorns after falling off my bike into the middle of a rose bush when a youngster! Ouch!

However, I have started to grow them in our garden in the last couple of years. The photo shows one of these - it has a yellow flower edged with pink and has a strong perfume.

Comments

Jill Spencer from United States on April 15, 2020:

Florrie is a sweetie! I like your list, especially sweet peas. They are so gorgeous. Like flower seashells.