The Weeping Willow Tree

Updated on June 24, 2013

Weeping Willow by the waterside

Weeping Willow by lake side
Weeping Willow by lake side | Source

Weeping Willow in Winter

Weeping Willow tree in winter - photo provided by Arborday.org
Weeping Willow tree in winter - photo provided by Arborday.org | Source

A little knowledge about a recognizeable tree, the Weeping Willow.

The Weeping Willow Tree

Offering up to 35 feet of shade, and growing as much as 8 to 10 feet a year, the weeping willow tree stands a beautiful ornamental giant among the other species of tree. This quickly growing shade tree is recognizable not only because of its long, drooping branches which create a canopy like effect, but also for its name.

Because the weeping willow is relatively low maintenance, it may not need much fertilizer if any. Avoid using too much fertilizer, “sparingly” is the key. They are able to grow in many different types of soils. If you decide to use fertilizer, use an organic blend and add it to the soil around the tree, not directly on the tree itself.

After planting, the tree will need some basic maintenance. The weeping willow prefers moist and cool conditions. Many landscapers use this tree to take care of areas where water tends to accumulate. This not only provides ample water for the tree, but also eliminates the problem of standing water. Trees planted near natural water supplies like ponds or creeks may not need to be watered as often. But, regular watering during dry months for at least the first 2 years of the trees life will greatly benefit the health of the tree. The leaves of the tree are a good indicator as to whether or not the right amount of water is being given. Droopy leaves indicate either too much or too little water, while crisp, healthy leaves indicate the proper amount is being received.

It’s a good idea to keep grass and weeds trimmed back and away from the tree for the first few years. But, the tree should be pruned regularly. The beauty of the willow tree is that it produces branch like “fronds” which can droop all the way to the ground, growing as much as 30 feet in length. A trim each season will promote healthy growth of the tree for the following year.

Unfortunately, the life span of a weeping willow is shorter than most trees. Many do not live much past 30 years of age. Pests like aphids and tent caterpillars can destroy the tree. Thus, you should frequently check for conditions like powdery mildew, cankers, abnormal growths, or discoloration. If you need assistance in caring for your tree, or believe that your tree is unhealthy, you should contact your local tree service company as soon as possible. The best defense against such pests is to keep your tree healthy because insects are less likely to attack a healthy tree.

Because of their grace and beauty, these trees have become one of the most sought after species for landscaping. Weeping willows have also been the subject of many myths and legends. A popular myth is that the weeping willow once stood tall and strong, but was so touched by the death of two lovers that it dropped its branches in sadness and could never rise again. Despite the stories and popularity, one thing is for certain, we have been blessed to have such a big and beautiful giant decorate our landscapes.

The Long Branches & Leaves of the Willow Tree

Weeping Willow Tree in Spring - Underneath the Canopy
Weeping Willow Tree in Spring - Underneath the Canopy | Source

Questions & Answers

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      • The Examiner-1 profile image

        The Examiner-1 4 years ago

        I was reading your Hub on the willow tree and I thought it was interesting, and useful if you were planning on growing them.

        There was only one word that made me think (simply my weird mind). You had mentioned 'droopy branches' and I wondered how would you know which were droopy on weeping willow tree. LOL

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