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Plants for South-Facing Windows (3 Easy, Sun-Loving Favorites)

Rachel is a passionate plantsperson, YouTuber and author living in Ireland. She grows a wide range of hardy subtropical and tropical plants.

From the endearing star cactus to the glossy cape lily, here are several plants that thrive in south-facing windows.

From the endearing star cactus to the glossy cape lily, here are several plants that thrive in south-facing windows.

3 Houseplants for Sunny Windows

Today I want to share some great plants for a south-facing window sill. There are lots of houseplants that appreciate the high light conditions that a south-facing window offers, but these three are my favorites by far.

There are many kinds of star cactus, including ones with and without spines.

There are many kinds of star cactus, including ones with and without spines.

1. Star Cactus (Astrophytum)

Commonly referred to as a star cactus, astrophytum have become extremely popular. When viewed from above, the characteristic star arrangement is easy to see.

Besides its pleasing symmetry, this cactus may also have fine white tufts of hair and spines. The spines are absent in many varieties, such as the very popular myriostigma, making it the ideal cactus for people who don't like prickly spines.

How to Grow Star Cactus

This is an easy plant to grow in a south-facing window that gets at least six hours of sun a day.

  • Grow in a clay pot with cactus compost.
  • Only water when the mix has dried out completely.
  • Avoid watering altogether between September and March.
Veltheimia bracteata has gorgeous, glossy leaves and flowers reliably every year.

Veltheimia bracteata has gorgeous, glossy leaves and flowers reliably every year.

Read More From Dengarden

2. Cape Lily (Veltheimia bracteata)

Veltheimia bracteata, also known as the Cape Lily or Forest Lily, makes the perfect pot plant for a south-facing window in a cool room. This South African bulb produces glossy leaves with wavy edges and stout purple stems, each bearing a terminal raceme of pink, tubular flowers. The tips of the flowers are sometimes green.

The Cape Lily flowers reliably from February to April, but its leaves make a handsome pot plant even after that. Although the bulb does go dormant in summer, its dormancy is very brief, and this vigorous plant soon returns to growth, making it almost evergreen. Flowers require no staking.

How to Grow Cape Lily

  • Grow in good compost with added horticultural sand.
  • Repot only when congested, ensuring the neck of the bulb is just above the soil surface.
  • Water freely when in growth, applying liquid fertilizer every two weeks.
  • Cease watering when dormant.
Dracaena draco is an easy keeper with pretty red-tinged leaves.

Dracaena draco is an easy keeper with pretty red-tinged leaves.

3. Dragon's Blood (Dracaena draco)

The dragon's blood plant, or Dracaena draco, is grown for its foliage. The dragon's blood name comes from the fact that the plant exudes reddish resin from wounds and nicks. The leaves are solidly green with a narrow red edge. Healthy plants will develop a slightly reddish tinge to the leaves.

This plant is a tree in its native habitat, but will seldom grow to taller than three feet indoors.

How to Grow Dracaena

  • Grow your plant on a south-facing window sill.
  • Allow to dry out between waterings.
  • Pot in a well-drained mix and feed every six months with a slow-release fertilizer.

© 2021 Rachel Darlington

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