Why Do Ladybugs Swarm on Your House?

Updated on November 12, 2017
Bob Bamberg profile image

Bob's been in the pet supply business and writing about pets, livestock, and wildlife for a period spanning three decades.

All of a sudden, on a warm, sunny day, swarms of ladybugs converge on the sunny exterior of your house, garage or shed.
All of a sudden, on a warm, sunny day, swarms of ladybugs converge on the sunny exterior of your house, garage or shed. | Source

Why They Do It

Known as cluster-hibernators, ladybugs swarm because they're looking for a warm place to hibernate for winter.

When one of them finds a suitable place to spend the winter, it releases a pheromone that attracts a couple gazillion more of them. In fact, the pheromone can keep the ladybugs coming back year after year.

Not content to just sit there soakin' up the rays and workin' on their tans, they enter the house, often in large numbers. The kids don't have to stand there holding the door open, either.

Ladybugs simply find loose-fitting screens, cracks, and vents, and soon enough, they're house guests. It’s a phenomenon that causes a great deal of exasperation.

When And Where It Happens

This phenomenon happens every fall primarily from the Midwest to the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada. In southern New England where I’m from, it occurs on warm, sunny days in October and even into early November.

Ladybugs appear to be most attracted to houses with natural wood siding and ample southern exposure. They're also attracted to houses in wooded areas, light-colored houses warmed in sunlight, and especially older houses with lots of crevices.

While they are pests, they're not harmful to humans or pets, they don't reproduce during hibernation, and they don't damage structures.

Prevention Is The Best Solution

  • To keep the bugs from getting in, repair loose-fitting windows and doors, seal cracks, and secure vents.
  • If they get in, suck them up with a vacuum cleaner and release them outside, otherwise the survivors can crawl out of the bag and re-infest your house.
  • Their bodily fluids are smelly and can stain, so avoid squishing or sweeping them.
  • If you want to use an insecticide on them, select one that has pyrethrin as the active ingredient. Pyrethrin is a derivative of the chrysanthemum plant and is safer than permethrin, which is highly toxic to cats.
  • In general, cats are more vulnerable to health problems caused by insecticides, so a call to your veterinarian would be a good idea before you start spraying indoors.
  • Your veterinarian will want to know the active ingredient in the insecticide, and it's always listed on the can, often in the lower left section of the front of the can.

Interesting Facts About Ladybugs

  • Ladybugs are a kind of beetle.
  • Superstition has long held that they are a symbol of good luck and that killing one is bad luck. My hunch is that this superstition has resulted in far more ladybug lives being saved than episodes of good fortune.
  • There are some 400 species of ladybugs in the U.S., and most of them are beneficial.
  • Worldwide, there are over 40,000 different species of beetles.
  • Ladybugs are voracious predators, consuming aphids and other insects that are harmful to plants. That's the silver lining in this cloud of ladybugs. If you have houseplants, it may behoove you to become a ladybug rancher.

A Beetle Similar To The Lady Beetle May Also Swarm On Your House

There's another species of beetle that will probably swarm your property and that you're likely to confuse with the lady beetle; the multicolored Asian lady beetle, pictured below. It, too, is beneficial.

Source

Here's How To Tell Them Apart

  • Its color ranges from yellow to yellowish-orange
  • It has a bunch of black spots on the dome-like shell that covers most of its body.
  • 19 is the maximum number of spots you'll find on the Asian lady beetle.
  • The pronotum, that collar-like area between the head and wings, features a marking that resembles a black capital M.

How The Asian Lady Beetle Got Here

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released the Asian lady beetle in Georgia and other southern states between 1978 and 1982 as a natural control for pest insects.

But that bunch vanished and no others were seen until 1988, when they showed up in Louisiana, apparent stow-aways on a ship docked in New Orleans. Now they're found all over the eastern U.S. and eastern Canada.

An Educational And Environmentally-Friendly Alternative Solution

You can build or buy lady bug houses in which the insects can hibernate. These houses can be purchased online and at wild bird specialty stores, nature or science stores, feed and grain stores, and, I'll bet, in museum and zoo gift shops, and Audubon Wildlife Sanctuaries. You can also find plans online so you can build your own lady bug house.

Questions & Answers

  • Why do I see more beetles in the house on warm days? I thought they were supposed to go outside on warm days.

    The beetles you see in your house are in there to hibernate, so they won't be looking to get outside. Warm weather can trick some of them into thinking that spring has arrived and it's time to get up and face the year. They typically won't be looking to leave for another month or so.

  • How do I get rid of swarming ladybugs?

    You could hose down the surface where the ladybugs have clustered and repeat as necessary. You would still need to check for tiny openings and cracks that would give the insects entry into your house.

  • Do ladybugs live in the ground below the windows of the home?

    They live above ground, usually in crevices and hollows of trees, except when they gain entry into your home for hibernation.

  • We have a swarm in our school, I have two as a pet, should I try to keep the rest of them and feed them?

    I'm not sure you'd be able to feed them as they prey on aphids, spider mites and other tiny insects. While they're hibernating, they do not feed.

© 2012 Bob Bamberg

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    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 days ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi, Pat,

      One more blessing to count! You're lucky that they're not problematic to you because they are to so many people (as you can tell by the comment stream). Thanks for the Angels...they're helping me keep this thing at bay. I still feel good, but I do get a little fatigued the day after my portable chemo is disconnected...not that I'm wiped out; I can still function, but I sure look forward to getting home from work. Thoughts and prayers always for Steph and HW!! Thanks for the nice card, too!!

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      8 days ago from sunny Florida

      Have never has a swarm of them but have had a group or so decide to come in a make themselves at home. Never have had to do much to be rid of them...guess they get bored and move on. I did not know that the colors ranged in shades as they do. I have only seen the red ones. thank you for filling in the vacant spots in my head bone. Angels once again are on the way ps

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      4 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Put ID tags on them in case they escape.

    • profile image

      Mary Rose 

      4 months ago

      What should I do if I am keeping them as a pet?

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      4 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Kelly,

      I'm aware of the ladybug boxes but have never heard any comments about them. You can buy them at feed and grain stores, garden shops, and maybe the Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary if there's one near you.

      They amass just before winter because they're looking to hibernate...inside your home. It's not that they can't find their way out. Once they're in, they don't want out...they'll overwinter there. You'll see them active again when the weather warms up. There is nothing you can do to make them want to stay outside.

      This warm February weather tricks them and other insects. I saw a housefly on the outside of my slider...it was 70 degrees today in Massachusetts...but a cold front is coming through tonight and the temp will drop below freezing and will only climb to about 40 degrees tomorrow. That's gonna be one unhappy housefly!! Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    • profile image

      Kelly Dunigan 

      4 months ago

      Is it odd that these ladies infested right before winter and disappeared and now have returned yet again in a unseasonably warm February? It feels a lot like spring, early summer here in Alabama. We have them by the thousands and I don't mind them except a lot of them find their way in and not out so I have a lots of dead ones in the garage and window sills. What should I do to make them want to stay out side? I read about houses for them but I have never seen them and do they work?

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      5 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      That's a pretty scary experience, Kay! As a defense mechanism, many insects release a toxic chemical in the presence of danger. Ladybugs are insectivores, feeding on aphids and other small insects, so the bug that eats your plants certainly isn't a ladybug. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Kay 

      5 months ago

      The orange “ladybug” that has visited our house in Louisiana every year in mass since 1998 as we were building, I believe to be the Mexican bean beetle. It bites and it also ravishes my spring and fall garden vegetables. It eats small holes in the leaves. Last year I was unfortunate enough to have one inside my mouth Not only did it have a nasty taste, but it also numbed my mouth for about 8 hours. Illegal aliens!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      5 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Love Ladies, certainly there are many who dislike any insect, but there are many others who recognize their value. We owned a feed and grain store where we also sold pet supplies, wild bird products and lawn and garden chemicals and supplies. We retired in 2011, but even back then I was selling more and more organic garden products. Today I service some similar stores and their organic products are more plentiful than the traditional chemicals. Take heart; a large segment of the population is environmentally responsible, or making the effort to be, and that's the future, even though it can't come fast enough. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Love Ladies 

      5 months ago

      I'm a gardener so I very much dislike it when I read comments like the ones below where people hate lady bugs and actually spray them with pesticides or say that they bite. It's this kind of rampant pesticide use that has lead to the decline in bees and other beneficial insects, as well as the large rate of cancer in our world. Without bees people, there is no food. Give that a thought before you spray. I've transported hundreds from my walls and windows to my indoor garden and they definitely do not bite. When people say they do, it makes others dislike the ladies and kill them. I wish folks would educate themselves on the dangers of poisons rather than that of a harmless ladybug. For Pete's sake, having a beetle in a kids mouth is not the end of the world - kids should be playing outside in the garden in the dirt with the bugs, so these things will happen. The same goes for spiders, who are amazing helpers in our world. They creep me out but I recognize their needful existence.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      7 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Maria...while they can be annoying, they're traditionally linked to positive things, so many people have a warm spot in their heart for ladybugs. You have a special, meaningful link to the ladybugs that visit you every year and I trust you take comfort in their arrival. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your story.

    • profile image

      Maria Cossack 

      7 months ago

      I

      Started seeing clusters of ladybugs in my house 4 years ago (after my mom passed) I have the home 10 years...I love ladybugs now!!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Tritrain (And Drewson)...you're one in a million...that rare individual who would actually welcome the lady bugs! Reading the comment stream below, you'll see that lady bugs are public enemy number one. There are a lot of people who would gladly send you their lady bugs! Thanks for stopping by with such a refreshing comment.

    • tritrain profile image

      And Drewson 

      8 months ago from United States

      Very nice article! I'd love for them to be attracted to my garden that way, pheromones. I just need to create a warm home for them, I guess.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Sherrell...I'm glad you found it interesting, especially enough to take the time to comment. Thanks for stopping by.

    • profile image

      Sherrell07@aol.com 

      8 months ago

      Interesting

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Terri...Yours is a common experience this time of the year in many parts of the country. I'll bet, like most people, you used to have a sort of warm and fuzzy feeling about lady bugs. Thanks for commenting.

      Kay...It's fortunate that your great granddaughter didn't experience some sort of reaction from the beetle in her mouth. In that situation, where they get trapped in the saliva, they may bite and release a chemical that's part of their natural defense. Your post demonstrates how much more than an annoyance they can be. Thanks for sharing your experience.

      Tash...I think yours is the first such post from the West Coast. Here in the Northeast, I haven't heard any complaints about the Spring wake up...probably because you don't notice when they leave, like you do when they gather. Thanks for stopping by.

    • profile image

      Tash 

      8 months ago

      We have them on the West Coast as well. All I know is it's gross. We get them twice a year, spring when they wake up & fall when they're looking to hibernate. I live in a high rise & it looks like a ladybug super highway, they even form lanes, with them walking up & down the building looking for a place to hide.

    • profile image

      Kay Reed Peeler 

      8 months ago

      They stink, they bite, my 22 year old grandson is allergies to them, his eyes swell and turn red. My oldest great grand daughter got one in her mouth, I thought she had a toy car wheel, and when I put my finger in to retrieve it, she had a stinking Beatle in it.

      Wish they would leave and not come back to middle Tennessee.

    • profile image

      Terri 

      8 months ago

      They stink, are invasive, and are everywhere. We can't walk from the house to the car. The sides of my house are orange, and bug covered.Sprayed them on the house, killed some. Still have them seeping into the house. Arrrgh!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Louise...Mums aren't known to have insecticidal qualities as far as I know. Chrysanthemums are a natural insecticide, though. Pyrethrin, a synthetic insecticide, is a derivative of the chrysanthemum. So far it sounds like you've dodged a bullet...continued good luck! Thanks for stopping by.

      Nicole...They do secrete a noxious substance when threatened or when they're crushed. Enough of them concentrated in a small area could be problematic, I would guess. Thanks for stopping by.

      Linda...You should tell us how you really feel about the whole thing, lol! This comment stream is full of responses similar to yours. People are saying it's the worst swarm ever, they're getting bitten, and the stains and odor are awful. Your situation will improve in the coming days. Thanks for commenting.

    • profile image

      Linda Hall 

      8 months ago

      Those USDA idiots need to be tied to my white porch columns in October. They can look like the LA freeway. We can't work outside - they fly down your collar and in your hair and they bite and are foul smelling. I've been told some people are allergic to them. We've had to run from the car to the house. My daughter at about 10 years of age had hundreds of them in her room and couldn't sleep in there. They leave brown excrement inside and out on our house. At any time you may find them in your beverage after setting it down. And to think, we paid to have this government torture inflicted on us. Anyone who thinks these are a good idea is welcome to come clean my house, man the vacuum cleaner, carry in the groceries, mow the yard, drive the tractor, weedeat the yard, water the plants, and re-paint the house with these little monsters crawling on and biting you.

    • profile image

      Nicole Lackey 

      8 months ago

      I've been old by a friend who became sick after vacuuming up a 5 gallon bucket of dead ones out of a window seals, that his doctor told him they put off a toxin and in those amounts it could make u feel bad. Have u ever heard of this?

    • profile image

      Louise Frierson 

      8 months ago

      I have seen a few bugs this year but now swarms. I wonder if the fact that I have mums keeps them away?

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Dianna...the Asian Lady Beetles eat aphids as well. The major differences, I think, are in appearance. Sort of like different breeds of dogs and cats look different, but they're still dogs and cats. Thanks for stopping by.

      Janet...I've not read anything that says their bites are dangerous. Like any insect bite, I assume they can become infected if you keep scratching or picking at them. Thanks for commenting.

      Mya...very interesting story and not an experience many of us have had (and thankfully so). Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Peggy...I've never heard of that happening, have you? I don't know how things like that get started, but it would be pretty common knowledge if it were true. Thanks for stopping by.

      Robert...I'm with you. I'm 71 and don't remember these swarms as a kid growing up outside of Boston, but they sure are real now, aren't they. Thanks for commenting.

      Phyllis... Ladybugs can take many colors. This is from Discovery.com "Although the classic ladybug (also known as the ladybird) is a deep, fire engine red with deep black spots, the tiny creatures actually come in a variety of different colors: red, black, orange, yellow and even pink.

      There is a case on record with the National Institutes of Health where a dog ingested 16 Asian lady beetles and suffered something similar to a chemical burn as they released a substance with the nature of the chemical constituents of H. axyridis hemolymph, that is part of their natural defense.

      They became embedded in mucosa covering the hard palate and required manual removal because they couldn't get away on their own. The chances of this happening are pretty slim...but who knows; dogs will eat almost anything. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Phyllis Moran 

      8 months ago

      You need to do some more research. Those are not ladybugs. Lady bugs are red. Those are a hazard to our animals as they bore into an animals palette and live they are dead. Please. Research beytrr please.

    • profile image

      Robert L Hudson 

      8 months ago

      I have seen several rounds of these over the years including in a camper and even a pickup camper. We live in North Central Arkansas and while not screaming yet, we have plenty. What I'm trying to think back to is when I was a kid. I'm sure we had Ladybugs but I don't recall real indoor infestations. I am 75 so it's possible the houses of yesteryear around these parts were not much warmer than the outdoors.

    • profile image

      Peggy 

      8 months ago

      I heard they can get in pets mouth and cut their air off and kill if they get in their mouth is this true!!!

    • profile image

      Mya 

      8 months ago

      Mnt Grove/Cabool Missouri

      Yes, these bugs are bad this year and the bites hurt but I don't have any reaction other than the instant pain of the bite... Unless you want to count if it bites a second, third or fourth time.

      Few years back, we walked into our tiny old 100 yr old cabin and they were 2 inches deep on the floor in about a 4x6 foot area. Most dead, many not. Had to walk through them to get to rest of cabin. Oh my gosh the stink of walking and squashing them.

      But not as bad as the half inch larva dropping out of ceiling fan. Ugh.

      Thanking God this was not our home, but a dwelling on the land we built our home on.

      I feel sad for the family who we bought it from who did live in the cabin.

    • profile image

      Janet smith 

      8 months ago

      Are the bites from them dangerous.?

    • profile image

      Diana Levine 

      8 months ago

      Are the yellow Asian beetles as beneficial as red ladybugs? Do they eat aphids? But

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Cindy...there have been others in this comment thread who have complained about gnats, or maybe they're fruit flies, but I haven't seen any secret weapons on how to control them. I guess conventional control methods are in order. Thanks for commenting.

      Paula...the silver lining in this dark cloud is that even though they're a nuisance, they're beneficial insects that control other insects harmful to our plants. Some may not agree that it's a worthwhile concession. Thanks for stopping by.

      Roy...I'll bet the "benefits vs unintended consequences" battle depends upon whose ox is being gored. For some the plan works; for others it doesn't. Thanks for commenting.

      June...a lot of folks have reported being bitten, and a lot of folks have been reporting that this is the worst year ever for the lady beetle event. I wonder if there's a connection. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      June E. Kersten 

      8 months ago

      These Asian Lady Beetles BITE! After a few cold days, it warmed up and the sun was hot on my back door. I went outside carrying my dog and felt something hurt my arm. When I looked it was one of these beetles on my arm and it had bitten me.

    • profile image

      roy johnson, northwest alabama 

      8 months ago

      another usda experiment gone wrong. same with kudzoo plant, same with stocking alligators in wheeler wildlife to control beaver population, said it was to cold for the gators to survive, so riddle me this, why are folks seeing 10-12 long gators living on the refuge? someones feet needs to be held to the fire on this sort of stuff.

    • profile image

      Paula 

      8 months ago

      Been fighting a losing battle with these Asian beetles for years. Makes me insane!! We can thank the government geniuses for importing them here. They have no natural enemies. Nasty bugs! I think our govt brought them so they should irradicate them. The sooner the better!

    • profile image

      Cindy Dashko 

      8 months ago

      I live in Southern Delaware and just started seeing the lady bugs today, not to crazy thank god. I am sorry to change the subject but how the heck do you control all these nats!?? OMG they are everywhere and the flies too.. not used to all these bugs here. Thank you all!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Ellen...There have been a lot of homemade solutions mentioned in this comment thread, some probably more successful than others, but none is the magic bullet. After vacuuming the bugs, remove the bag outdoors. Vacuuming doesn't necessarily kill them, and they can get out of the bag and re-infest. Thanks for commenting.

      Bev...I salute your good humor in the face of such an insect problem. Thanks for stopping by.

      Melbeans...using a natural flea and tick product is a good suggestion. Perhaps it will be helpful to some of the visitors here. Thanks for mentioning it.

      John...I think I've heard of Skin So Soft as an insect repellent before. Staining is the drawback, though. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

      Jeffrey...Funny post, I salute your humor as well. It's hard to laugh when such a problem is occurring. I sure hope your cat shows up soon! Thanks for stopping by.

      Harp...thanks for the tips. I bet they'll be helpful to many. Thanks for commenting.

      Elaine...someone else in this comment stream reported that they had a frost, and that didn't keep the ladybugs away. I think they're on a biological mission based on an environmental timetable, so it's tough to figure them out. Thanks for stopping by.

      Terri...I'll bet that's a beautiful rig you've got there! The swarming usually lasts from a few days to a couple of weeks, seemingly according to the weather locally. I hope you escape without stains, etc. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

      Sharon...I don't know what the deal is this year, but several people have reported that this is the worst they've ever seen it. I had my first infestation in 2012, which prompted me to write this hub, but haven't had one since. Yesterday I had a few get between the screen and glass of my slider, but none swarmed on the side of the house...and it's wood siding in full sunlight and our temperature is around 70 degrees, which is warm for this time of year. That should be paradise for them, but I've dodged a bullet so far. I wish everyone in this comment stream could be so lucky!

    • profile image

      Sharon Litwin 

      8 months ago

      Bob thanks for the comment! and we JUST got over a gnat (probably fruit fly) infestation and i just saw one yesterday! if orange scent brings those back oh no! i tried everything on them too and hated to, but ended up spraying them with bug spray which did it..........but for good! whats up this year to make gnats and lady bugs so bad? Thanks, Sharon

    • profile image

      Terri 

      8 months ago

      I'm in Northern Alabama living in a Bighorn fifth wheel. These bugs were all over the place today. They literally had me in tears. I controlled them getting inside and I sprayed the heck out of the rig but only after they completely covered it. Thanks for the Avon suggestion. One thing I'm not reading is how long does this investigation last? Thanks

    • profile image

      Elaine 

      8 months ago

      We yesterday was TERRIBLE!!! I live directly in the middle(almost) of MO ... So don't know where they came from or belong at!!! Please come get!! I had every kind. 3 kinds. Today still a few. Liked the comment about the skin so soft. Willing to try this hot one day cold the next is not good if they keep coming.

    • profile image

      Harp 

      8 months ago

      The first year we lived here we had them so bad inside the house.We were catching them 30 or more a night our Yorkie is cared to death of bugs and he will alert you every time he see's one. We had the bug guy come out and he sprayed but seemed to bring more of them..So we never called him back and since then the number each year drop.Last night we only had a few but we sprayed the windows and doors with peppermint spray and that works till the smell go's away..I also have put bleach around the glass edges of the windows and doors

      outside with a brush that also worked..

    • profile image

      Jeffrey Jay 

      8 months ago

      I live in the Springfield Area and I think they ate our cat. He has been missing since they showed by the thousands. Sucked up a whole vacuum bag of the little buggers!

    • profile image

      john 

      8 months ago

      Hi ya all ,I live in sw Missouri and deal with these year after year ,and yesterday was the biggest swarms we had ever hade bar none , it was a plague and time to go into battle , I have tried many things over the years to kill or keep them away with no success , all I could do I vacuum them up in side when they got in , but yesterday I rigged a shop vac and put it on a extension pole on the hose vac started vacuuming them up on the outside of the house , soon I realized it was a lost cause ,I had a idea and finally SOMTHING WORKED !!!! ,TAKE AVON SKIN SO SOFT and spray it around the windows in side and out side ,and most of them wont go near and the ones that do die ,its the only thing we have found that works, one draw back is its oily and will stain paint on drywall ,we have vinyl windows and and spraying them in side and out side WORKED GOOD ,try it

    • profile image

      Melbeans 

      8 months ago

      Swarmed in southwest Missouri yesterday. Spent most of the day spraying and vacuuming up so the pets wouldn't play with them or eat them. Nightmare. Used a natural flea and tick killer to spray outside seams of the house and roofline and that seemed to deter them. Sprayed it heavily where I saw them trying to enter near the corners of the home at the roofline.

    • profile image

      Bev 

      8 months ago

      Asian Beetle Report same here in North Arkansas Ozarks. Great morning. By noon it was an episode from Hitchcock ‘s The Birds.... only swarming Asian Beetles. Horrific and I am not afraid of bugs.We spent 3 hours vacuuming them out if our house. Today is foggy, so I don’t know how successful all the caulking we did around doors and windows will be on a sunny day. White farmhouse, so they love us.

    • profile image

      Ellen Bussert 

      8 months ago

      The Asian Lady bugs have swarmed my parents house in Southern Illinois for years. Every year thousands of them come to visit. My Mother spends a great deal of time cleaning the dead ones up every day.

      After some internet research, I mixed lemon Pinesal and water in a spray bottle. I sprayed around all outside doors and windows. It killed what was there, but they still came back after the smell was gone. I also read that you could put cloves and cinnamon in a sock and set it on your window sills. This may not have worked as well as the lemon scent, but your house smells great.

      Best tip ever to remember to clean out your vacuum and put the dead bugs outside.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Sharon...I don't know if the orange air freshener will help or not. Loretta, whose comment is just beneath yours, heard that lemon juice and water, heated and distributed through the vent, is helpful. Maybe citrus is an aroma that they don't like. Wouldn't it be a hoot of those who use citrus to ward off lady bugs suddenly got swarmed by fruit flies?

      For those inside the house, vacuuming them up is probably the best. If you swat and kill them, they can stain ceilings and walls. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Loretta, thanks for the tip. I wonder how it would work if you kept a pan of lemons in water simmering on the stove and turned the stove vent on? I hope some people will try it and report back in this comment stream. Thanks for stopping by.

    • profile image

      Sharon Litwin 

      8 months ago

      at Lake of the Ozarks MO on the lake. Yesterday we got SWARMED with them! i was teaching a webinar in home office and probably a few hundred came from outside to inside the office. GROSS! and they bite! the kitchen is also FULL of them. they are also swarming our decks and front door. and i opened the car door to get in and 10 followed me in!!! i sprayed orange air freshener , not sure it that did the trick, but this am a lot of them are dead this am. BUT a lot are still alive ! what do i do in the house to get rid of them the best way??? is the orange air freshener any good? a friend told me about that. Help!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Trudy...a lot of folks are reporting the biggest swarm they've seen, and that they do bite. One would think that a frost would do them in...and it probably did some of them in...but sometimes it takes more than one frost to put an end to insects for the season. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    • profile image

      Loretta Rives 

      8 months ago

      Heat sliced lemons and water in microwave, turn the vent on. It seems to help keep them away some what.

    • profile image

      TrudyW 

      8 months ago

      Biggest swarm yet yesterday here in central Pennsylvania. They do bite. it's a full-time job keeping them cleaned up. I thought we were done with them because we did have a nice hard Frost. But yesterday it got back up to 66 degrees. So they were back. Did I mention that I hate them.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hello Nyoma Hanley, I'm so sorry I didn't respond to your question 3 years ago when you asked it...I just saw it now! I must have missed the email that HP sends when someone comments on a hub.

      You probably already have the answer to your question about what kind of bug you're getting...black with red lines on the wings. That would be the box elder bug, which releases an odor when disturbed or crushed. Again, I'm so sorry for missing your post.

    • profile image

      Brinda Diebel 

      8 months ago

      I'm in Reading ,Michigan , and I have had some ladybugs not to many they seem to come out more when the farmers harvest their corn , but I have been invaded with stunk bugs by the thousands, all I know to do is spray Dawn dish soap on my house and around the doors and windows..

    • profile image

      Lorrie 

      8 months ago

      I live in Oklahoma and yesterday these things were everywhere on my house and now, this morning I am seeing them around my ceiling fan!! Why is it that people from all over different states just got hit with these in very large amounts yesterday?? Do these little creatures know something that we don’t as far as weather goes??

    • profile image

      Mary K. 

      8 months ago

      Interesting and so timely! We are in the foothills in northwestern NCand have had ladybug invasions for years, but this year’s been the worst! Why do so many die once inside? And, if they do live to hibernate, when/ how do they get back outside? Thanks for the information!

    • profile image

      PHaggerman 

      8 months ago

      I also live in Central Missouri and yesterday was the worst day by far of these beetles....which are NOT lady bugs. These are Asian beetls, they bite, and stink when mashed....they are also a culprit in the loss of our actual ladybugs!!!!

    • profile image

      Mary 

      8 months ago

      My granddaughter at U of Minn in Minneapolis has been infested in her college apartment. Finally brought out the vacuum to the vents, etc. Surprised that far north.

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      Debbie 

      8 months ago

      I live in Mountain Grove,Mo. We live in the country. Our home is covered with these things. We have sky lights in our bathrooms. I walked in there yesterday and they were covered on the ceiling and dead ones all over the floor. Also they are crazy outside. And yes , they do bite. We had them last year too but not like this year. Guess I'll try and vacuum them up. Don't want to use any pesticides cause we have a indoor cat. Will be glad when their gone.

    • profile image

      Diane 

      8 months ago

      I live in Lebanon, Mo.We live in country, I came home, stopped at mailbox, dropped some letters, so got out of car, they were just swarming, not close to any structure. They were getting in my car, my little granddaughter was in there, afraid she would get bitten. They do bite & stink!!

    • profile image

      8 months ago

      They do bite.

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      Jane Sokolik 

      8 months ago

      Very helpful!

    • profile image

      Brenda 

      8 months ago

      I was told use lemon juice to get them to move away from your doors and windows lemon juice an water mixed as a spray and it wont kill them either.

    • profile image

      Crystal KY 

      8 months ago

      Evening. Im curious. I live in Western Kentucky. I haven't seen any all year. Today I was outside due to random warm weather in the middle of a freezing week. I went inside for about an hour. Went back out to find my doors, windows, car, house was covered. They were swarming me even. The inside of my house is covered now too. Does that mean something specific? A sign of weird or crazy weather ahead? Or just because it was warm today? Thanks :)

    • profile image

      8 months ago

      My house has been swarmed on now 4 years in a row ..so bad I have to get my house sprayed. I do not understand how they found me..

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      Cynthia 

      8 months ago

      I live in Licking Missouri they are all over the outside of my house they are all in my windows the flying all over the landing on the ceilings and they do bite they're very annoying and when you smash one they stink I'm not sure how to get rid of them but if anybody has a cure to get rid of them please pass it on they have been landing on me all day on top of my ceiling is covered

    • profile image

      Lisa 

      8 months ago

      It's a damn nightmare! First thing in the morning theybare not there, but by 1pm there are millions... I have not been in the newly built house a year yet. But hey are everywhere! I open the door and have like 10 or more land in me. The bees are out to, and I'm allergic, so I'm terrified!!!!

    • profile image

      DD 

      8 months ago

      These things swarm my house every year by the thousands...

      This is the worst year yet.

      There has to be multiple thousands in and around my home that I have been vacuuming up all day, and haven't even scratched the surface it seems. My ceilings are still crawling with them from one end of the house to the other.

      They go straight to the furnace after vacuuming as I cannot stand them, and apparently it isn't going to hurt the population any.

      My basement gets full and the smell in the house can get terrible as i have to walk through the house and constantly stepping on them until cold weather arrives, then the fall cleanup of the house gets in full swing, then wait for next fall, rinse and repeat.

    • profile image

      Cindy 

      8 months ago

      Thank you for this page, it has great information.

      We live near the center of Missouri, in Houston, No. I have never had lady bugs before, and rarely have seen one.... until today !! There are literally so many of them that we can't even open our doors and they swarm inside and are everywhere. Friends from at least three surrounding towns are telling me the same thing. Due to so many, is there any thing we can do to clear them out? Thank you !

    • profile image

      yvonne boyer 

      8 months ago

      Okay Bob here is the deal I don't like them they are nasty and i am glad they don't swarm your house but they do mine and are flying in the air come get them let them out at your house okay

    • profile image

      Angie 

      8 months ago

      I have swarms of roly poly bugs on the outside of my house around the door ways - suggestions? I have tried diatamaceous earth and it hasn't helped . Any suggestions would be appreciated

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      8 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Shana,

      I haven't had a swarming problem, which is lucky for me because my house is natural wood siding with due south exposure. The sun beats on the house all afternoon. This time of year it's low enough in the sky that for most of the morning, the sun is behind trees.

      Interestingly enough, I had a few of them today. They got in between the screen and glass door of our slider. I have a bird feeder about 10 feet away, but the birds were interested in the birdseed. From now until spring, I add freeze-dried meal worms to the birdseed for extra protein and fat to help them get through the winter. They were lovin' it today. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Shana 

      8 months ago

      I have had them swarm here for years although a nuisance I am hoping to get some good luck lol I am in fort Smith Arkansas and bird sanctuary? Wonder if the birds like them?

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      9 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Su, hopefully they won't get into your house! Thanks for stopping by.

    • profile image

      Su 

      9 months ago

      I live in the south of england. I noticed them swarming near the house I sat and watched them for a while and hundreds seemed to be coming from the trees. Then they started swarming me !!! I have never seen anything like this before. I feel very lucky.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      12 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi, Mandi, having a few lady bugs in the house to patrol your plants would be nice, but, you're right...you'd end up with a bunch of them. When they swarm in the fall, however, they do so to hibernate. So, while they wouldn't breed, they also wouldn't feed. Thanks for stopping by, nice to see you.

    • profile image

      Mandi Rinaldi 

      12 months ago

      I've always loved Lady Bugs. We've been in our condo (which is light grey wood surrounded by woods but also lots of sun) for 2 1/2 years and until reading this have thought that we had a lot of them. Now I know though that we don't! A lot to me was several a day (mostly in the fall) at the most and certainly no swarming like I've read about here!

      I have been having recurring problems with my house plants (aphids, mites) and thought that since they are all concentrated in one place that I could get a few Lady Bugs to eat all the pests, but am now concerned that that might lead to them breeding and then there could be too many of them inside. I also have a good sized garden, but NEVER see Lady Bugs there...they are always concentrated on the opposite side of our condo.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      19 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Karen, I've heard from others in Texas who are seeing swarms for the first time. I checked the Texas Department of Agriculture web site's Pest Alert section and there was nothing about lady beetles, so I searched the site and came up empty, so it must not be anything big. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Karen 

      19 months ago

      North Texas is getting it, too. My family has lived on this property for 30+ years and we've always had lady bugs, but we've never seen them swarm like this before. They're all over our house and cars. We also usually don't have overly harsh weather normally in the winter and we're in for some unusually cold weather for us this weekend. Maybe they don't always have to hibernate in our area because of the normally mild temps.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      19 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Welcome to the club, Vaelorn. If any get into your house keep in mind that they can stain if you swat them. Otherwise they're a nuisance but will be dormant until spring. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Vaelorn 

      19 months ago

      They are getting further south! I live in South Texas (San Antonio area), and we just found a lot of them all over the outside of the house! I can see some on our neighbors' houses, as well!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      19 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Vanessa, it looks like they've finally gotten around to your neck of the woods. They're seeking shelter and will try to get into your house. If they do, they'll hibernate, so you won't see them flying around much until Spring. It's best not to swat them because they can stain walls and ceilings. Glad you stopped by...appreciate your comment.

    • profile image

      Vanessa Graham 

      19 months ago

      We have had them for the last few days. They're everywhere. We live in Waxahachie, TX/Reagor Springs, Tx. They're all over my house, the brick house across the street & over at my mom's, about 1/2 mi. away. I've never seen anything like this before. What is going on?

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      19 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Angela, a lot of folks love East Texas. My step daughter is in Corpus Christi and loves it. The ladybugs aren't particularly fussy...they hibernate in the less attractive areas, too. They're equal opportunity pests! Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      19 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Cori, looks like you dodged a bullet til now. You'll probably see them every year, now. I'm glad you found the information useful. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    • profile image

      Angela 

      19 months ago

      Hey. I am in East Texas too in a town called Carthage. I have been seeing a lot of these and today when I got into my car, they were flying around inside. Once I parked, I found several on the outside of my car. From the previous comments, it looks like they are finding East Texas to be a good place right now to swarm. Thanks for the info.

    • profile image

      Cori 

      19 months ago

      I live in East Texas around Tyler (in a town called Troup) and yesterday I went outside around 3 and they where everywhere!!! My mom even called and said she had like 25 or so in her dining room. I have never seen this !!!! Thanks for the info very helpful!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      20 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      It's something to see, isn't it, PamB? Stucco would be an excellent surface to attract the lady beetles. You just want to be sure they don't get into your house! Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      PamB 

      20 months ago

      I'm in Louisiana and just walked outside to let the dogs out....we were swarmed by Asian Ladybugs! Hundreds of them! Flying, landing on the house (stucco) and windows! One did bite my wrist but it didn't really hurt. Have never seen anything like it!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      20 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Joyce, thanks for stopping by. I've not heard of the peppermint oil and water treatment, but it seems a good natural alternative to chemical bug sprays. Does your solution repel or kill the bugs, and are there any surfaces that can be harmed or stained by it?

    • profile image

      Joyce 

      20 months ago

      They are a nuisance here in northeast Mississippi! I have been spraying them with a mixture of 50/50 peppermint oil and water.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      20 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Rosemary, they sure are an annoyance, but they're harmless. About the worst thing that can happen is stains on surfaces if you squash them. I don't know if they could survive in the greenhouse if you get below freezing temperatures in East Texas, but food wouldn't be a problem. They gather in swarms to hibernate, and when hibernating, the don't feed. Thanks for commenting.

    • profile image

      Rosemary 

      20 months ago

      We live in East Texas and yesterday those bugs were all over ...They covered each sunny wall plus our bodies, and a few trying to get into my mouth. We have never seen anything like this swarm. I am still trying to get them out of the house and into our greenhouse, although that may not be a good place for them since everything is hydroponic and I don't think there are any bugs for them to eat. They even got into the dogs coats and then, of course, they brought even more of then into the house. We sure could have used them last spring when every rose bush had aphids.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      21 months ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Paige,

      I live in a tan house, too and we've got some unseasonably warm weather coming the next few days...mid 80's...so I expect to see the swarms, too. It should only last a few days. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Paige 

      21 months ago

      OMG I was just taking the dog out and became covered one even in my mouth yech Had to shake them out of my clothes and hair the dog had to be brushed out. I live in a tan house in a wooded area when will it end!!!!

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      2 years ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Kitty, nice to meet you. Your son should be glad they weren't mosquitoes! All I've ever seen were dozens of them on my house, but I've talked with people who said they had hundreds. Luckily not many of them actually make it indoors. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Kitty Curry 

      2 years ago

      Got a million of them outside now freaked my 16 yr old son out lol but I told him it was a sign of good luck never seen this many at one time before

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      2 years ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      Hi Clowes, nice to meet you. It appears that last year you dodged a bullet but this year you got two in the hat. Any lady bugs that got in will probably show up on ceilings or high on walls to start with. If you swat them, they'll stain the surface. You might consider it a silver lining that they'll hibernate, so won't breed. If you have houseplants, they might be helpful when they wake up in the spring because they eat aphids, spider mites and other small pests that can damage houseplants. Best wishes as you face another Nebraska winter (and we think we have it tough here in New England...ha). Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      Clowes 

      2 years ago

      I just walked outside with my husband and we were greeted by swarming ladybugs (of some sort) and we had been outside 2 hours prior and they were not there. They were just everywhere and we have never had the problem here before and even when we walked out to our driveway they were floating everywhere and they kept landing on us...it reminded me of the movie "The Birds" only with ladybugs. Ugh!!! We didn't give them a chance to stay on us long enough to bite but my husband has mentioned they bite before because we have had about a dozen in our upstairs before. But absolutely nothing like this!! I don't know anyone who has had this issue here in Nebraska...it makes me not want to leave my house but also makes me feel trapped. We have lived in our home for a little over a year and we never had this problem a year ago...sorry but I am all for killing off pests...and in this situation these ladybugs are pests...no idea how though at this point, just hoping few get in as I have 4 children.

    • Bob Bamberg profile imageAUTHOR

      Bob Bamberg 

      2 years ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

      That sure is a strange experience, Fran, and I don't know why they'd swarm you. Stranger things have happened, I suppose. I wonder if anyone else out there has had a similar experience? Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

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