Yes, You Can Compost Meat in a Worm Bin!

Updated on February 6, 2018
JenniferWilber profile image

Jennifer Wilber works as an ESL instructor, substitute teacher, and freelance writer. She holds a B.A. in Creative Writing and English.

Yes, it is possible to compost small amounts of meat in a worm bin. The red wigglers love it!
Yes, it is possible to compost small amounts of meat in a worm bin. The red wigglers love it!

Conventional wisdom says that you should never try to compost meat or other animal products, especially in vermicomposting systems. Websites listing compost “dos” and “don’ts” almost invariably list meat as a “don’t.” Many people claim that meat is especially forbidden in worm bins, claiming that the red wigglers used for vermicomposting are strict vegetarians who can’t digest meat proteins. I’m here to tell you that these claims are absolutely false.

I bought my Worm Factory 360 vermicomposting system about a year ago as a way of reducing the amount of garbage that my husband and I send to the landfill every week. The first thing I did upon ordering the system was read everything I could about setting up the system, properly managing the system, and what kinds of things could be put in the bin. The second thing I did was completely ignore these guidelines (within reason).

Conventional Wisdom Myth: Never Compost Meat!

One thing I noticed during my initial research was that most articles about vermicomposting and composting in general claimed that only plant materials can be composted, never animal materials. Now, this made absolutely no sense to me. Animals are just as organic and biodegradable as plants, so why wouldn’t you be able to compost them? Nature has been composting all of these things itself all the time, since long, long before humans even existed. There’s no reason why meat and other animal products couldn’t be broken down in human-directed composting systems as well. Meat is just as good a source of nitrogen for your compost as any fresh plant material.

After doing some more reading, it became clear that these guidelines are in place simply because of concerns that meat may attract wild animals in poorly maintained outdoor composting piles and bins. If you simply throw your left-over chicken bones on top of your compost pile, of course wild animals, such as coyotes, skunks, and bears, will smell it and start to cause problems on your property.

Using small amounts of meat and animal products in secured bins or buried deep enough in a compost pile or composting trench so that there is no smell is perfectly fine, however. Of course, this applies to traditional outdoor compost piles, not necessarily to vermicomposting. Is there any truth to the claim that red wigglers can’t process meat? Or are these guidelines simply being overly cautious when it comes to indoor vermicomposting systems?

Newly arrived red wigglers ready to move into their new home, the Worm Factory 360.
Newly arrived red wigglers ready to move into their new home, the Worm Factory 360.

But What About Vermicomposting? I Thought Worms Were Vegetarians!

When I really thought about it, the claim that red wigglers cannot process animal proteins made no sense. Inside the worm bin, worms are hatched, live out their lives, die, and are reabsorbed into the system. It’s the circle of life on a micro scale. If the worms can handle processing their fallen brethren, then why not the remains of an expired pack of turkey cold cuts, or maybe a piece of steak that fell on the floor? In the grand scheme of things, these types of meats are no different from deceased composting worms themselves.

My husband and I have a bad habit of buying too much lunch meat and then forgetting to eat it all before it goes bad. Really, we should just work on reducing the amount of waste we create to begin with, but once it’s expired there’s nothing else you can really do, so it’s best to find some other use for it other than sending it to the landfill. I can’t stand throwing meat away, since it feels like the animal died for nothing. But if I can compost it, at least it is being used in some way.

The Worm Factory 360 multi-tray vermicomposting system, which is kept in my laundry room.
The Worm Factory 360 multi-tray vermicomposting system, which is kept in my laundry room.

How To Compost Meat in the Worm Bin

In order for the meat to break down the Worm Factory 360 fast enough, I first cut the meat into tiny pieces. If there is paper in the package, such as cold cuts that came from the deli counter, I cut up the paper along with the meat for added carbon. Then I either mix it directly into the worm bin contents, or into the compost collection bucket on my counter (depending if I am ready to empty the bucket yet. I don’t leave meat sitting inside the countertop bucket).

Once the meat is inside the worm bin, I make sure to cover it with plenty of bedding materials, which you must do with anything you add to the bin anyway. All newly added food scraps should be buried in the top tray of the worm bin anyway to avoid bad smells. The smelliest problem I’ve had in the year that I’ve had my worm bin was caused by not burying a moldy piece of bread deep enough.

The meat is always gone by time I check on it again a week or two later. The worms seem to process lunch meat at about the same speed that they process their favorite fruits, such as strawberries. I’ve seen pieces of carrots last longer in the worm bin than meat. Red wiggler worms can clearly process meat products just fine, as I’ve never seen rotting pieces of meat left in the bin, and I’ve never experienced the putrid smells that you would expect from rotting meat when digging around in the bin. There is absolutely nothing wrong with putting small amounts of meat, cut up into small pieces, in a worm bin.

First I cut up the expired chicken lunch meat into small pieces, which will more easily break up inside the composting system.
First I cut up the expired chicken lunch meat into small pieces, which will more easily break up inside the composting system.
I dig out a space on one side of the top tray of the Worm Factory 360, then dump in the cut up cold cuts. I mixed in some of the existing compost material and bedding after adding the meat.
I dig out a space on one side of the top tray of the Worm Factory 360, then dump in the cut up cold cuts. I mixed in some of the existing compost material and bedding after adding the meat.
Make sure to cover up the newly added materials with bedding materials before putting the lid back on. Right now my worm bedding consists mostly of shredded paperback books (which were too badly damaged to donate or sell).
Make sure to cover up the newly added materials with bedding materials before putting the lid back on. Right now my worm bedding consists mostly of shredded paperback books (which were too badly damaged to donate or sell).

A Final Word

There are a lot of misconceptions about composting on the internet, as most articles are simply rehashes of older information that other people have written. The best thing to do when you first start composting, either with a worm bin or with a traditional compost pile, is to simply experiment to find out what works best and what doesn’t work. In general, anything that was once alive can be composted. It is also important to make sure your compost includes a good mix of “browns” (carbon-rich material, such as dead leaves, paper, or cardboard) and “greens” (nitrogen-rich material such as fruits and vegetable scraps, meats, and other food waste). Different people have different opinions on what the proper ratio of these materials should be, but in general, you will want more “browns” than “greens” in your mix. Also, make sure your newly added “greens” are covered with a layer of “browns” to prevent any smells. If done right, your compost bin should have a nice “earthy” smell, and never smell rancid, even if you use left-over meat as one of your compost ingredients.

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    © 2018 Jennifer Wilber

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