Home ImprovementRemodelingCleaningGardeningLandscapingInterior DesignHome AppliancesPest ControlDecks & PatiosSwimming Pools & Hot TubsGaragesBasements

A Quick Guide to Fixing Low Water Pressure

Updated on January 03, 2017

Joined: 5 weeks agoFollowers: 1Articles: 3

Low water pressure is generally described as annoying or irritable, but it can be a genuine roadblock in your day. When going to take a shower, the soap becomes more difficult to rinse out of your hair. Similarly, trying to just rinse away the syrup on your breakfast plate simply won't work - at least, not without wasting water and time. Speaking of time, your clothes might just need some extra as well since the washer isn't filling quite like it used to. While this frustrating position does have a fair amount of potential causes, there is just as much of information on how to find those and even a few home solutions to try.

A Lone Low Pressure Problem

If you find that the low pressure is only occurring in one fixture, that may actually be cause for some celebration. In faucets, this is usually an indication of a clogged aerator. Simply unscrew the nozzle and look for any signs of build up.

Even if that does appear to be the case, be sure to turn on the faucet with the aerator removed to ensure that you have found the problem. If the pressure still appears to be low, it may instead be a clogged pipe. If it is simply the aerator, however, it can be cleaned by soaking the part in a vinegar-water solution. Should you still have trouble at that point, an inexpensive replacement will do the trick.

Showerheads may have a similar issue with a clogged nozzle. This can also be cleaned out with the same vinegar-water solution. If that does not clear up the problem, however, a new showerhead may be in order.

Hot Water, Low Pressure

If you're experiencing a low pressure issue exclusively with your hot water, chances are it's a problem with your hot water heater. The first thing you should check is that the shut-off valve for the tank is fully open. If it is or that doesn't appear to help, there may be sediment in your hot water tank that will require a flush. While you can clean out the tank with vinegar as well, you may also try reaching out to a local plumbing service to have it done professionally.

The Low Pressure Household

Where there is a larger problem, there is also, unfortunately, a greater list of possible causes. The easiest of these is to confirm that your main shut-off valve is open all the way. If it is not, this is something you can adjust on your own. If the problem still persists with the correction, it may be a problem with the pipes.

A leaking pipe can be the cause of low water pressure. To determine if this may be your culprit, shut off the water taps both inside and outside your home and record the meter. Keep these off for a few hours, then check the meter once more. If the water usage has changed, you will most likely need to reach out to a plumber for the leak. Clogged pipes, either from debris, minerals or corrosion built up in them, may also require professional assistance.

If you have recently moved into your home, check to see if a water pressure reducing valve has been previously installed to limit the force of water coming from the municipal supply line. A plumber can adjust the setting on this to allow for a higher flow rate.

Pressure Out Of Our Hands

Especially if you are new to your home, don't hesitate to reach out to your neighbors and ask if they have the same problem. City pipes are just as susceptible to leaks, buildups and similar problems, so, if your neighbors are experiencing similar problems and haven't already, you may try reaching out to your local water supply. Even still, it is possible that your city may just be delivering water at a low pressure, which would be considered 40 psi or lower. It might also be noted that slightly more energy is require to move uphill, so where you are located and even your location in the building can play a small part on the water pressure.

It is still possible to do something about it, however, even when outside circumstances are out of your control. Water pressure boosters, which work by increasing the pressure of the water on its way from the main water line to your kitchen and bathroom fixtures, can be installed but, on average, these can cost $800 or more before any installation fees.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    Click to Rate This Article