Efficiently Heating and Cooling Homes with High Ceilings & Rooms

Cooling a room with a vaulted ceiling can be difficult.
Cooling a room with a vaulted ceiling can be difficult. | Source

High and vaulted ceilings are definitely a popular design in our homes and buildings. They give the room a much more open feeling and lend well to a more "grand" looking room as well. Typically, there are large windows at the peak or skylights too that give that open air feel and let in a nice amount of natural light which is always a welcome benefit. The question that is commonly asked among those who have this gorgeous design though is, "How do I control the temperature of this room better?"

Well I'm glad you asked. There are a few tips that can be offered to help with this and a bit of information that you may want to consider if you are building your home and have vaulted ceilings in your design. During construction is the best time to "nip this in the bud" but there are also things that can be done for those who are beyond that.

The fan in your furnace is capable of moving more air than that oscillating one you're running.
The fan in your furnace is capable of moving more air than that oscillating one you're running. | Source

You're Not Really Cold!!!

Ever wonder why today, when your house was at 70 degrees you feel fine and then tomorrow, at the same temperature, you're freezing? Much of this has to do with persperation. Your body temperature combined with humidity, air pressure and other factors can often leave you clammy and thus feeling cold. Instead of cranking up the heat, try running your furnace fan to create air movement. This can help evaporate the moisture on your skin and even out the temperature in your home by mixing the air. You might even be amazed that without turning up the heat, the temperature on your thermostat will actually increase a degree or two in the winter months when the fan comes on.

Use Your Furnace Fan to Help Heat and Cool Your Home More Evenly

In today's world where energy conservation is more and more considered, we still run 4 or 5 fans throughout the house to move air when we have one fan that can move air in every room and will end up using less electricity. This is the fan on our furnace.

Many people do not realize that the "fan/auto" switch on the thermostat is there for exactly this and that even though you're running the fan, the heating or cooling cycles will still operate as they normally would. The trick here is that they will likely not run as often since you are not allowing the air in the home to separate. This is a particularly good idea on our more extreme temperature days.

On nicer days, where the temperature outside is where we'd like it and let's say we don't have air conditioning, this is a great idea to open the windows and doors while letting the furnace fan draw in the outdoor air and cool down that sauna that those hot days have made out of your home.

As for energy, the fan starting is where the most power is being drawn. Once a furnace fan is running, it doesn't cost that much to keep it doing so. Sure, it puts a few more miles on the motor but if your filters are kept up on and you've done your fan maintenance, you won't have any problems with this. Just think, you spend "x" amount on multiple fans, the electric to run them and they don't filter the air for what if you have to replace a fan motor a few months sooner than you would anyway. It's easier to keep up with one fan as opposed to many.

This is a large return air grill because this house's HVAC design was improper when it was built and is the only one in the home thus, it must draw all the air the furnace requires through one hole.
This is a large return air grill because this house's HVAC design was improper when it was built and is the only one in the home thus, it must draw all the air the furnace requires through one hole. | Source

Spread Out the Returns

The above is improper because it creates an uneven draw of air throughout the home. It's large enough so it doesn't affect the wear on the motor but it doesn't help to heat and cool the upstairs at all...except that it keeps it hot in the summer and cold in the winter!

The Importance of Return Air Placement

Return air is an important aspect of heating and cooling those high ceilings that ties right in with the use of your furnace fan. As I said, the furnace fan is great for creating air movement and keeping the air mixed but for those who have great return air placement, the benefits of that fan are even better. This is how the fan can filter the air as it works while removing the warm air as well.

First, let's understand that cool air displaces warm air. I guess you can say it rises but that's really not true. It's pushed up by the heavier, cooler air. It's also good to know that heat "attacks" cool, not the other way around. Heat is greedy and wants to impose it's will on everything cooler than it is. Okay, so now that the fan is off, the air is not mixing and the heat up there at the ceiling is sitting on top of the cooler air, greedy heat will begin to warm the air below it. What if there was a way to pull this hot air off the top and cool it? There is. This is where a high wall return air register comes into play.

If you're building a house and have a room with vaulted ceilings, be sure that your HVAC system design includes a high and low return air register in that room but that the extra return doesn't factor into the load calculations. This way, in the summer months, you can block the lower return and allow the high wall return to pull the heat off the ceiling allowing the cool air to build up better and in the winter, think opposite. Remember too that cold air being heavier is harder to move, right?

Blocking the return air can be simple by either using magnetic covers or by having a register with dampers in it installed so that you can push the lever to shut it down like a supply register.

Return Air Can Also Be Added to the Home

This addition really depends on the construction of your home. Some could be done quite simply while others may be a bit more difficult and costly to add.

In a nutshell, since there are...a few, different home designs out there, you need to get air from point "A" to point "B". The object is to seal off an opening so that the air is being drawn only from the area you want it to be (point "A") and taken back to the return air duct (point "B") wear it can be cooled and recycled. Hopefully this is something you can do easily but there are many cases wear the cost could outweigh the benefits. It really depends on where you're adding the return register in proximity to the return air ducting. You can use stud wall space to help contain the air along with the drywall so keep that in mind. Just be sure you're not drawing air from "dead" spaces, basements, kitchens or bathrooms. These locations will send less pleasant air throughout the home.

You could always use one of these. It will cool down just about any room. Just be sure to bolt everything down and hold on to your young.
You could always use one of these. It will cool down just about any room. Just be sure to bolt everything down and hold on to your young. | Source

Using Ceiling Fans to Help Heat and Cool Your Home

Ceiling fans are another great way to help heat and cool a room with vaulted or high ceilings. Nowadays, there are some really nice ceiling fans that can be mounted in vaulted ceilings and operated by remote. This makes it simple to use without the hassle of climbing up there.

"Climbing up there? I operate my fan with a light switch."

Yes. Yes you do and this is why I suggest the remote version. Why? You know that little switch on the base of the fan that nobody ever uses? That's why and the remote can do that too.

Using the ceiling fan's switch to reverse the direction of it's rotation is important to assist in whatever it is you're trying to accomplish. If you want to get the heat off of the ceiling and down to where you are, you need to let the fan push it down through the cooler air. If you want to help pull the cooler air up off the floor, you need to reverse the fan's rotation so that it can do that.

Be Happier with Your Great Room

I hope that this information will help you to be more comfortable in your great room. No doubt this is the room you likely spend your time in and on, you deserve to be cozy in it too. These tips are simple and should lend themselves well to the comfort of your "Home Sweet Home" without spending gobs of money and actually saving some in the process.

Happy home-owning!

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Comments 11 comments

Sk 3 months ago

Which way

menskits profile image

menskits 15 months ago

Nice hub! thank you for sharing!

Cre8tor profile image

Cre8tor 23 months ago from Ohio Author

t curcio - I set my thermostat as I normally would and then just switch the "auto-fan" switch to fan. This way the heat will come on as needed while the fan runs continuously. This helps to keep the air circulated and thus burning the gas a bit less often. You don't want to just run the fan with the heat off though. Of course if we're discussing the age old dilemma of "he's hot, she's not, she's hot, he's not", let me know when you figure that out. I will make a lot of customers very happy when they agree on the temperature at which the stat should be set. :-)

t curcio 23 months ago

I understand about the blower running all the time but should the thermostat be sett so that warm air can be distributed while blower is running anyway? my husband will not move the thermostat so that that happens the air that is being circulated is cold air in these high ceciling rooms.

Nicole S profile image

Nicole S 3 years ago from Minnesota

Very interesting! We have a high ceiling that gets nice and dusty on the chandelier. Nice hub!

Cre8tor profile image

Cre8tor 3 years ago from Ohio Author

Thank you.

Better Yourself profile image

Better Yourself 3 years ago from North Carolina

Interesting and useful hub! More and more homes are being built with vaulted ceilings so this is great info.

Cre8tor profile image

Cre8tor 4 years ago from Ohio Author

@Marcy - Heat is always in the eye of the beholder and I don't underestimate how chilly a Texas winter would feel after a Texas summer. Ohio had been near or at 100 degrees for 2 weeks and then yesterday...70's. I was freezing. Of course in February, I'll be wearing shorts when it's 50 and feeling like a summer day. Tricky stuff the weather...

If you like your fans in that room now, check out that remote control here. It can be added to an existing fan so perhaps if your d├ęcor is the way you like but want to have remote. There's your cake and there's your fork...dive in!

Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

Oh, wow - a major Aha moment here for me! I knew about the reverse switch (that nobody uses), but since my fans are too hard to reach, I abandoned the idea of messing with them. I need to do the remote thing. And I suspect buying new fans will show a payback just for the efficiency and for that feature (the ones I have now are probably 16 years old).

Even in hot Texas, rooms with high ceilings get cold in the winter due to the heat rising, so investing in new fans will pay off all year round. I can install the old ones in other rooms I use less often & that don't yet have fans.

Great and witty caption on your photo of the giant floor fan! Lol!

TahoeDoc profile image

TahoeDoc 4 years ago from Lake Tahoe, California

A few ah-ha sentences in there for me. Good job and this will be very useful in increasing the comfort of lots of people in their homes. :)

habee profile image

habee 4 years ago from Georgia

Great tips. I'll need this info when we close in our carport. Voted up, shared, etc.

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    Daniel Robbins (Cre8tor)318 Followers
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    Dan has been in the HVAC industry for 22 years with experience in aspects ranging from installation and service to sales and distribution.

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