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8 Steps to Mixing Concrete by Hand Without a Cement Mixer

Updated on June 25, 2017
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Eugene, an avid self taught DIYer, has acquired 30 years of experience with power/hand tools, plumbing, electrics and woodwork.

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Mixing Concrete Without a Mixer

A cement mixer does a great job at mixing concrete, thoroughly blending cement, stone and sand to give a consistent result. But is it possible to mix the concrete by hand without a mixer? Yes, with a little care and some effort. You might need to mix concrete for setting gate or fence posts or a clothes line in the ground or maybe to make a slab to act as a base for something. All you need to mix concrete is a shovel, a couple of buckets and optionally a sheet of plastic.


Your Options - Pre-mix Concrete or Make Your Own

If you wish to mix concrete by hand, there are two options:

  • Buy a bag of pre-mixed concrete (drymix). This is available at all good home improvement stores. It has all the ingredients dry mixed together for making concrete, i.e. the cement, sand and stone. All you have to do is put it into a bucket, wheelbarrow or on a piece of plastic on the ground, add water and spend a few minutes mixing it. Usually the product comes in 2 to 4 stone bags ( 10 kg to 25 kg) with varied setting times. Quick setting concrete is available for fixing posts into the ground so that they don't have to be stayed.
  • Premixed products from stores tend to work out more expensive if you are going to require several wheelbarrows of concrete. The alternative is to mix your own. All you need is cement, sand and stone (20 mm). Instead of sand and stone you can use ballast or gravel, which is a mixture containing varying sizes of particles ranging from sand to stone. Gravel contains rounded stone and was deposited in gravel pits as a result of the ice age and other geological activity. Crushed stone is produced in quarries by crushing blasted rock and then the result is graded by being passed through a succession of sieves. This tends to make better concrete as it grips better in the mix because of the sharp angular edges. Gravel or ballast can have a varying proportion of sand/stone, so you may need to judge whether you need to add additional sand, if any.

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Concrete Mixing Ratiios

A general purpose mixture suitable for fixing posts, making concrete pads, door steps, floors for sheds etc. is known as a C20 mix. Materials are mixed by volume not weight.

A C20 mix consists of:

  • 1 part cement
  • 2 parts sand
  • 4 parts stone (aggregate)

Alternatively a mix of sharp sand and stone, sometimes called ballast, can be used, and this is mixed 6 to 1 with the cement.

A stronger, more hard wearing C30 mix, suitable for thinner concrete slabs, e.g. pavements, consists of:

  • 1 part cement
  • 2 parts sand
  • 3 parts stone (aggregate)

Ideally stone should be 15 to 20 mm in size (9/16 to 13/16 inches).
Sharp sand should be used, graded from 0 to 5mm. Don't use fine stuff which is really for mortar/plastering.

This online calculator by DIY Doctor allows you to estimate quantities of materials required.

Note: A C20 mix is not suitable for building foundations

What Does C20 Mix Concrete Mean?

It means the concrete can withstand a compressive force (or more correctly pressure) of 20 newtons per square millimetre (20 MPa) without crushing. So in theory, for a 10 cm x 10 cm square (about 4 inches x 4 inches):

Area = 100mm x 100mm = 10,000 square millimetres

So total compressive force that the concrete can withstand without crushing is:

Force = pressure x area = 20 N/mm2 x 10,000 mm2 = 200,000 newtons.

A newton is equivalent to a weight of about 0.1 kg so:

200,000 newtons = 200,000 x 0.1 = 20,000 kg weight or 20 metric tonnes on a 10 cm by 10 cm square.

In reality a concrete slab would probably crack or sink with much less than this magnitude of load. This is because the underside of the slab would be spanning the individual stones of the sub base foundation and not supported underneath at every point over its full extent. These figures really refer to the compressive strength of a 150 mm concrete cube as measured on a test jig.

Tools and Equipment For Mixing Concrete

  1. Builders shovel (the pointy type one)
  2. Ideally three, 3 gallon buckets One for water, one for cement and one for sand/stone. If the sand or stone is wet and you use this bucket afterwards for measuring cement, it will stick to the sides and bottom
  3. Polythene sheeting A sheet of polythene helps to prevent mess and contamination of the concrete by pebbles, leaves, soil and other debris. It also makes it easier to scrape up all the leftovers with no wastage. I use 1200 gauge polythene (the heavy stuff used as a damp proof membrane under concrete) and this is widely available in hardware stores
  4. Wheelbarrow or buckets For transporting the concrete to its final destination. Alternatively you can mix in situ
  5. Steel toe-capped boots Optional. You may end up standing in or close to concrete while mixing/laying. Steel toe-caps protect your toes if you drop e.g. bricks or blocks on them

Buying Cement

Cement is generally available in 25kg bags. In the US it is sold in 47 or 94 pound bags

Mixing Concrete: Sand, Cement, Gravel, and Water

When mixing by hand, it is essential to thoroughly mix the concrete to get consistency throughout the mixture.

If you need to mix a small amount, for instance half a bucket, place the stone and sand and finally the cement into the bucket. This needs to be thoroughly dry mixed with a garden or block layers trowel. Water is then added, say half a pint at a time and mixed throughout the bucket. More water can be added until the concrete is at the required consistency. If the mixture becomes too sloppy, add more cement. If you are filling a hole in the ground e.g. around a post, the mixture can be sloppy so that it flows easier.

Larger quantities of concrete can be mixed on a flat surface on the ground

You can measure the proportions of the mix by counting shovels. However I find it easier to use buckets. If you go for a C20 mix, a single mix using buckets ( which totals 7 buckets of material) is enough to produce a wheelbarrow of concrete.

So remember you need:

  • 1 bucket of cement
  • 2 buckets of sand
  • 4 buckets of stone
  1. If you're using polythene sheet, spread it on the ground and weigh it down with blocks/bricks or whatever at the edges in windy weather
  2. Place the stone onto the ground followed by the sand. Alternatively you may have gravel which is a composite mix of large and small stone and sand. If there isn't much sand in the gravel, you can add some more
  3. Place the cement evenly onto the top of the pile. If you have someone to help you mix, it will be easier. Start at the edge of the pile with the other person facing you. The aim is for both people to keep shovelling the pile to one side to create a new pile adjacent to the old pile. Repeat this three times so that's four mixes in total.
  4. Now it's time to add the water. Make a crater in the top of the pile about half its diameter so that it looks like a volcano. Again, it's important that the pile doesn't have slopes that are too steep so when you add the water it breaks through the crater and runs down the slope! Add some water, the amount depends on the amount of dry mix you have created.
  5. Now with the shovel, go around the edges of the crater and keep sliding the mix into the center. Then use a chopping motion with the edge of the shovel to mix the water with the dry mixture. Continue to shovel the dry mixture from the edges of the pile towards the center. Eventually the mixture will become easier to control as the water becomes more distributed. Then keep sliding the shovel under the mixture and turn it over bit by bit and use a chopping motion with the edge of the shovel to thoroughly mix the concrete.

Don't forget to wash your shovel when finished before the concrete sets on it!

Step 1 - Spread a Plastic Sheet on the Ground

A large sheet of polythene keeps the ground clean, prevents contamination of the concrete by leaves,mud and other debris and you can scrape up all the leftovers
A large sheet of polythene keeps the ground clean, prevents contamination of the concrete by leaves,mud and other debris and you can scrape up all the leftovers | Source
Ecocem GGBS cement available in 25kg bags across Ireland and the UK
Ecocem GGBS cement available in 25kg bags across Ireland and the UK | Source

Step 2 - Measure Out the Materials

It's a good idea to use 3 buckets: One for cement, water and stone/sand
It's a good idea to use 3 buckets: One for cement, water and stone/sand | Source

Step 3 - Place the Stone and Sand on the Sheet

Measure out the stone first and tip the sand on top. Keep the pile to one side of centre so you can mix sideways
Measure out the stone first and tip the sand on top. Keep the pile to one side of centre so you can mix sideways | Source
Source

Step 4 - Place the Cement on Top of the Sand and Stone

Measure out the cement on top
Measure out the cement on top | Source
Crumble up any lumps of cement
Crumble up any lumps of cement | Source
Source

Step 5 - Shovel to One Side From the Edge of the Pile and Repeat Three Times

Shovel the pile to one side, taking the material from the bottom edge. Do this 4 times in total
Shovel the pile to one side, taking the material from the bottom edge. Do this 4 times in total

Step 6 - Make a Deep Crater and Add Water

Make a crater in the pile and add water
Make a crater in the pile and add water | Source

Step 7 - Fold the Mix in From the Sides

Shovel the mixture from the edges into the centre of the crater
Shovel the mixture from the edges into the centre of the crater | Source

Step 8 - Continue to Fold Inwards and "Chop" the Pile to Distribute Water Through the Mix

"Chop" the pile with the edge of the shovel to help distribute the water. Continue to add water
"Chop" the pile with the edge of the shovel to help distribute the water. Continue to add water | Source
Continue to add water as needed and walk around the perimeter of the pile, folding the mixture towards the centre and "chopping"
Continue to add water as needed and walk around the perimeter of the pile, folding the mixture towards the centre and "chopping" | Source
Eventually the mix should look like this
Eventually the mix should look like this | Source
Concrete slab, laid out and "screeded (levelled off)
Concrete slab, laid out and "screeded (levelled off) | Source
Here's "one I  made earlier". OK, I cheated and used a cement mixer!
Here's "one I made earlier". OK, I cheated and used a cement mixer! | Source

Curing of Concrete

During curing or hardening of concrete, a process called hydration occurs where water chemically bonds to cement. So some of the water you added actually never dries out. It is locked to the cement in a bond forever!

Important!!

Don't allow concrete to dry out in hot weather or if there are strong drying winds. It needs to cure slowly, so ideally cover with plastic to prevent moisture loss

Protecting Concrete in Cold Weather (or Dry Weather)

The best time to make concrete is when the weather is mild. Freezing weather conditions can weaken concrete and hot dry weather can cause water to evaporate too quickly so that there is insufficient water for it to cure properly, resulting in cracking.

Until concrete cures, it should be protected from the weather and never allowed to freeze for the first 24 hours. Minimum curing temperature should be 40 F (4C). In freezing weather conditions, water in concrete expands as it freezes. As ice crystals grow, they push the concrete outwards, breaking bonds between cement, stone and sand. Then when they melt, they leave millions of micro-cavities, so the concrete ends up porous like a sponge, potentially weakening it.
You can cover concrete slabs after laying with blankets/polystyrene/bubble wrap or whatever to help prevent it freezing. If frost is due to set in at night, lay your concrete early in the day so that it firms up, before covering with insulating material (otherwise it'll get marked by the covering).

In hot, dry weather, wait for a few hours until the concrete firms up. Then cover it with polythene to prevent moisture loss and cracking.

How to Mix Concrete in a Mixer

if you decide to use a mixer to mix concrete faster with greater consistency, the mix ratio is exactly the same. However here are some tips to get the best results. A bucket usually holds 3 UK gallons or about 13.5 litres:

  • A small Belle mixer such as the Minimix 130 or Minimix 150 will mix about 90 litres of concrete, so if you do a C20 mix, i.e. 1 bucket of cement, 2 buckets of sand and 4 buckets of stone, this will produce about a wheelbarrow full of concrete. You can make the mix stronger by reducing the amount of stone to 3 buckets
  • Start the mixer
  • Empty 4 buckets of stone into the mixer and add some water. The abrasive nature of the stone helps to scour any remaining wet concrete stuck to the drum from an earlier mix session. Take care when emptying stone into the drum that the bucket handle doesn't get caught by the the mixing spoons. If possible, remove bucket handles before mixing. Alternatively you can empty the stone onto the ground in front of the mixer and shovel it into the drum. Never put a shovel into a rotating mixer drum
  • Next add cement, sand and water alternately, either directly from buckets or from two measured out piles in front of the mixer. As you add cement and sand, watch for a moment to see how the mix is progressing and add water so that the mix is not over sloppy, but at the same time not so dry that it sticks to the drum
  • Continue to add the remainder of the cement and sand
  • If the mix starts to overflow out of the drum, place the wheelbarrow underneath to catch any spill
  • Allow to mix on full speed for about 3 minutes
  • Reduce the speed of the engine and commence unloading of the mixer into the barrow
  • When the drum is empty, a new mix can be started. However if you are working alone, stop the mixer
  • If you're laying a concrete slab, tip the mix from the barrow within the formwork (the boards which bound the slab). Roughly scrape out the barrow and use a shovel and rake to bring the level of concrete about 1/2 inch above the formwork
  • Start a new mix
  • If you work fast and alone, you should be able to lay about 3 barrow loads of concrete before a slab needs to be screeded or levelled
  • Don't forget to wash all concrete from your tools before it sets and hose out the drum, ideally while the engine is running and the drum is tipped. Try to avoid getting water from the hose onto the engine. If the mixer is electric, unplug it and relocate the extension lead out of range while hosing

Cement mixer
Cement mixer | Source

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    • profile image

      Rick 4 months ago

      In Peru, we use three(3) small wheelbarrows (about 20 full shovels per wheelbarrow) of sand/rock mix (called 'ripio') to one 42.5kg sack of Andino Type I cement. I've seen it mixed as light as seven(7) wheelbarrows/sack but, I don't know that I would trust that ratio.

    • eugbug profile image
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      Eugene Brennan 4 years ago from Ireland

      Don't worry! I won't be standing outside Batchcrete in Perth with my "No Mixers" placard!

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      Batchcrete 4 years ago

      Excellent information you have provided here about cement mixers. For large industrial sites, cement mixers are the only way to go to mix concrete and mortar. This machine will really save you time.

      http://www.batchcrete.com.au/productlisting/mixers...