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WaterBUG Water Pump Product Review

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Mike has been an online writer for over eight years. His articles often focus on home repair and home maintenance.

This article will break down and review my experience using the WaterBUG surface water pump.

This article will break down and review my experience using the WaterBUG surface water pump.

WaterBUG Surface Water Pump

I recently purchased a house that I intend to fix up and sell. There is an addition off the back of the house and the foundation is failing. Upon pulling up the flooring (there is no access to the crawl space below), I discovered quite a bit of water. My plan is to install footings and a beam, but first I need to get some of the water out of there.

After doing some research, I found the WaterBUG surface water pump. The reason I chose the WaterBUG is because I need to suck up the surface water, which is sitting directly on dirt. Most pumps would either get clogged up with debris in this situation, or they would require that I dig a hole and install a basin so I could submerge the pump.

The WaterBUG's claim to fame is you can set it right down on a surface, and it'll suck everything up without getting clogged. They claim it'll suck up water down to 1/16th of an inch. Virtually dry as they say.

Putting the WaterBUG to the Test

I also purchased a garden house that I attached to the top of the the WaterBUG. I see that you can also attach on the side of the unit, but for what I'm doing the top was best. As you can see in the pictures, I have a decent amount of water to move.

I didn't prepare the area at all. I just set the WaterBUG down in the water, which meant it was sitting right on soil, and pulled it in.

It immediately started pumping and pumping fast. After about a half an hour of pumping and moving it around to different wet areas, I was definitely impressed. The only issue I ran into a couple of times is that it seemed to clog a bit. When this happened I'd unplug it, and hold the unit on its side and let the water run out. I could pick the debris off the bottom of the pump. After that, I'd set it back down and it would pump like a champ again.

I did have a specific issue in the corner of the addition, having to rest it a couple of times but not seeing any debris. After I got enough water out of that area, I noticed there was a layer of plastic down on the ground. I pulled that up and set the WaterBUG down on the soil and didn't have any more issues.

You can see I set the pump in one of the footing holes I started to dig. I pulled all the surface water and brought it down to the level I had dug.

You can see I set the pump in one of the footing holes I started to dig. I pulled all the surface water and brought it down to the level I had dug.

Two Different Models

As it turns out, there are two different models offered for the WaterBUG. There is a basic model, which you can get at home improvement stores as well as on Amazon.

There is also an improved model, which they call the GLO. I can't find this model on Amazon, but I did find it on the shelf at Home Depot. This is the model I got. It has a plug that lights up green when the pump is in action. Other than that I don't think there is much different between the models.

If I had it to do again, I would save the money and get the basic model.