How to Write an Interior Design Concept Statement

What Is a Design Concept Statement?

An interior design concept statement is the essence of an interior design proposal. If you are bidding on a project or entering a design competition, the design concept statement lays the groundwork for the visual components of the presentation. Never assume that your design can speak for itself!

An interior design concept statement must effectively convey your inspiration and vision for a space. It briefly addresses how you went about creating the design and handled specific design challenges. The statement should also articulate the room’s overall ambience.

Carefully consider your interior design concept statement.
Carefully consider your interior design concept statement. | Source

It tells your client the origin of the design and demonstrates your ability to create a symbiotic relationship between physical elements. Think of you design concept statement as a mission statement or the “Eureka” moment of the project.

Each designer has their own way of composing and formatting an interior design concept statement. Just make sure you include a few essential pieces of information. You will become more confident in your ability, as you do more proposals. Follow these basic pointers and your concept statement will surely impress!

Keep It Simple

Be succinct. Write several descriptive sentences that communicate the purpose, focus and fundamental concept of your design. Resist the urge to sell yourself. Your design concept statement is not an advertisement.

First, state the intent of your design and then explain how you accomplished your objective. Example: The intent of this design is to take advantage of the home’s classic architecture, bring in additional natural light and utilize a combination of vintage and contemporary furnishings and accessories.

You can elaborate on your selection of specific design elements and the principles employed when covering the visual presentation portion of your proposal.

Detailed examples of design elements should presented separately from your design concept statement.
Detailed examples of design elements should presented separately from your design concept statement. | Source
Tailor your interior design concept statement to meet specific client requests.
Tailor your interior design concept statement to meet specific client requests. | Source

Address Client Requests

Sometimes you may need to adjust your design concept statement to conform to client guidelines. You may have a killer design and spot on concept statement, but don’t forget to follow special client instructions.

Often times a client will have input which greatly influences your design direction and concept statement. If your client has a specific vision in mind and wants a lengthy account of the design concept, follow their wishes and instructions to the letter.


Things to Avoid

Avoid using overly descriptive and flowery language. Even common adjectives such as “beautiful” and “marvelous” are ambiguous and do not aptly describe the look or feeling of an interior space.

Avoid long, drawn out statements. Use short sentences for your design concept statement. This may require sidelining your creativity while you put on your editor hat. As with any proposal writing, long sentences dilute the effectiveness of your core concept. Brief statements are much more impactful and will hold your audience’s attention.


Avoid being egocentric. Do not write your design concept statement in first person. Your personal opinions and desires are not relevant to this piece of information. A design idea, vision or solution should not be about you. It should reflect what works best for your client.

Helpful Resources

If you are unsure of your ability to write a compelling interior design concept statement, check with your local ASID chapter for suggestions. You may be able to find a mentor willing to help you with your first few design concept statements. The Internet and local library are also great sources of information for interior design writing.

© 2012 lindacee

More by this Author

  • Seven Principles of Interior Design

    I know it seems as if interior designers use some type of magic to create gorgeous rooms with a minimum of effort. Watch any TV decorating show and you’ll see what I mean. Magic or no, the common thread of any...

  • A Pocket Guide to Mid-Century Modern Style

    Looking for a style change that combines retro glamour and a minimal vibe? Look no further than mid-century modern! You can incorporate touches of classic mid-century modern into virtually every aspect of your home....

  • Seven Elements of Interior Design

    For some of us, interior decorating is an enjoyable hobby, for others it is a daunting task best left to professionals. If you are discouraged with the design process, I would like to provide a ray of hope. If you...

Start a Conversation! 7 comments

leahlefler profile image

leahlefler 4 years ago from Western New York

These are great tips - especially the avoidance of generic, flowery words. I love the concept statement example you provided!

lindacee profile image

lindacee 4 years ago from Southern Arizona Author

Thanks Leah! Empty descriptive words and writing in the first person are the two big no-no's of design concept statement writing. Glad you liked it!

Simone Smith profile image

Simone Smith 4 years ago from San Francisco

I'm so glad you wrote this Hub! I was really wondering about interior design concept statements as soon as I first heard about them, and nothing spells happiness like satisfied curiosity!

It's interesting that you encourage folks to AVOID overly flowery language- and I'm really glad that you mentioned that detail! I can imagine how many people would be tempted to use it with interior design concept statements- especially if they're new and kind of nervous.

lindacee profile image

lindacee 4 years ago from Southern Arizona Author

Happy I could clarify, Simone! Yes, you would think flowery language would be required in that discipline. It would be extremely difficult not to throw in a "mahvelous, dahling" once in a while! :)

rameh 2 years ago

the write up gives an insight into the basics of the interior design

lindacee profile image

lindacee 2 years ago from Southern Arizona Author

Thanks, rameh, for reading and commenting!

Stephy 3 months ago

No wonder my concepts always made me feel something was wrong with them! Your point regarding flowery language is a significant aspect to consider. Thanks a lot. :)

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.

    Click to Rate This Article