Renovating and Reupholstering Solid Oak Vintage Ercol Dining Chairs

Updated on June 13, 2020
Nathanville profile image

When doing DIY projects I love to recycle and upcycle; and when renovating old furniture maintain some of the patina to show its age.

An Inheritance in Need of Renovation

We inherited a set of four vintage oak dining chairs years ago. But with already having a good set of vintage oak dining chairs in our dining room, and with more recently being given another set, we just put them in our loft for storage (e.g. far too good to dispose of lightly).

In working through my DIY ‘to-do’ list, however, these chairs have worked their way to the top of my list; and the time came to renovate and re-upholster them.

Last year, I got one of the chairs down from the loft—which my wife is now using as her sewing chair in our conservatory—because of all the chairs we have, it’s the one she finds most comfortable for sewing. Therefore, renovating them now also has the added advantage of giving a new lease of life to one of them, as my wife’s preferred sewing chair.

Provenance

Before starting on the renovation and reupholstering I looked on the bottom of the chairs to look for any manufacturer’s labels, and found a paper sticker on each one that read 'This is an Ercol Production'.

In searching the Internet I quickly discovered that Ercol is a renowned British furniture manufacturer of quality furniture, based in Buckinghamshire, England, and was established in 1920 by Lucian Ercolani (1888–1976), an Italian furniture designer.

In searching their website, although I couldn’t establish the date of manufacture, I get the impression that these chairs were probably made circa 1950’s, and that originally they would have been sold as a set of six, including two carver chairs (dining chairs with arms). This is consistent with that although we only inherited four chairs; the set came with two spare seats!

Extent of Renovation

Unusually for dining chairs of this age, the chairs were structurally good, e.g. not rickety, so no regluing of the joints was required.

However, they were very grimy, and the seats very grubby and badly stained.

Therefore the intention was to give them a good clean and polish, and reupholster the seats.

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The four vintage Ercol dining chairs to be renovated.Five of the six seats to be reupholstered.
The four vintage Ercol dining chairs to be renovated.
The four vintage Ercol dining chairs to be renovated.
Five of the six seats to be reupholstered.
Five of the six seats to be reupholstered.

#1: Cleaning the Chairs

Not wishing to lose all the patina by taking them back to the bare wood and re-staining, wiping old furniture down in white spirit, and perhaps scrubbing clean with warm soapy water, is usually sufficient. But the grime was so deeply engrained into the wood, that no amount of cleaning did the trick, not even white vinegar; or a degreaser (used for cleaning kitchen surfaces), although the degreaser did make some inroads into the grime.

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White vinegar and warm soapy water, with scrubbing brush and sponge; used for cleaning the chairs, after washing them down with white spirit.A degreaser tried to further clean the chairs of stubborn grime, prior to resulting to pressure washing.
White vinegar and warm soapy water, with scrubbing brush and sponge; used for cleaning the chairs, after washing them down with white spirit.
White vinegar and warm soapy water, with scrubbing brush and sponge; used for cleaning the chairs, after washing them down with white spirit.
A degreaser tried to further clean the chairs of stubborn grime, prior to resulting to pressure washing.
A degreaser tried to further clean the chairs of stubborn grime, prior to resulting to pressure washing.

As nothing else made any real inroads into the deeply engrained grime, I finally resulted to the drastic measure of giving it a go with my pressure washer; and that did the trick. Albeit, after cleaning them with the pressure washer it became obvious that I would need to do some wood re-staining before giving them a good shine with beeswax polish.

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Pressure washer and chair on lawn, with pressure washer attached to outside tap.Chair on lawn being deep cleaned with a pressure washer. The Nilfisk pressure washer I use.
Pressure washer and chair on lawn, with pressure washer attached to outside tap.
Pressure washer and chair on lawn, with pressure washer attached to outside tap.
Chair on lawn being deep cleaned with a pressure washer.
Chair on lawn being deep cleaned with a pressure washer.
The Nilfisk pressure washer I use.
The Nilfisk pressure washer I use.

#2: Re-staining the Chairs

I chose a wood dye rather than a polyurethane wood stain, and I applied it with a cloth rather than brush.

Both are translucence, but the main differences are that:

  • The wood stains coats the surface giving a shiny protective finish, like a varnish; whereas the wood dye penetrates into bare timber, giving more of a matte finish.
  • Wood dyes tend to be more expensive than wood stain.

Three coats of wood stain would be ideal for a dining table where you would want a good smooth, even, shiny protective, durable finish; but for these chairs I wanted to maintain the patina appearance, rather than a showroom look.

Wiping on and rubbing in with a cloth ensured an even thin coating of wood dye that absorbed into the bare wood to give a natural appearance of age.

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Chairs after being cleaned with the pressure washer:  Left, re-stained with wood dye, and right, chair waiting to be re-stained.The dark oak coloured wood dye I used.
Chairs after being cleaned with the pressure washer:  Left, re-stained with wood dye, and right, chair waiting to be re-stained.
Chairs after being cleaned with the pressure washer: Left, re-stained with wood dye, and right, chair waiting to be re-stained.
The dark oak coloured wood dye I used.
The dark oak coloured wood dye I used.

#3: Reupholstering the Seats

Compared to other chairs I’ve reupholstered in the past, this was a relatively simple and quick task:

  • The seat covers are only held in place with a few staples underneath, and
  • The padding and webbing were reasonably good condition and therefore didn’t need stripping down or replacing.

The only issue I had was that in removing the seat covers it revealed that all the seats had been badly infected with woodworm; which is less of a problem these days than it used to be.

Removing the Seat Covers

To remove the seat covers I just simply prised up the staples with an old screwdriver, and pulled them out with a pair of pliers.

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Removing the staples with an old screwdriver and pliers.The underside of the seat prior to removing the staples.The underside of teh seat, once the cover had been removed.The original cotton layer, under the cover, to hold the seat padding in place.
Removing the staples with an old screwdriver and pliers.
Removing the staples with an old screwdriver and pliers.
The underside of the seat prior to removing the staples.
The underside of the seat prior to removing the staples.
The underside of teh seat, once the cover had been removed.
The underside of teh seat, once the cover had been removed.
The original cotton layer, under the cover, to hold the seat padding in place.
The original cotton layer, under the cover, to hold the seat padding in place.

Treating the Woodworm in the Seats

Although there was no sign of recent activity and it was only the seats, and not the chairs, that had been infected with woodworm, it’s better to be cautious. Therefore, with the covers removed I soaked the bare wood with a generous application of woodworm killer, applied in several coats by brush; and left overnight to dry.

However, woodworm is less of a problem in Britain these days as they don’t like the central heating because it dries out the wood too much for the woodworms taste.

Reupholstering With Recycled Material

The covers removed were not the original coverings, but they did badly need replacing. The question was what to replace them with e.g. a durable cloth, such as recycling old curtains, or covering the seats with recycled leather like material.

After some discussion with my wife we decided to use some of the dark brown suede backed faux leather that I and my son salvaged from an old sofa our next door neighbours put in their front garden to take down to the local dump. We took the sofa off their hands and stripped it down to salvage the covering and as much wood as we could.

The steps to reupholstering with the suede backed faux leather:

  • Having removed the old coverings from the seats, I used one of them as a template to mark and cut out six new seat covers from the faux leather.
  • Then for each seat in turn I placed the new seat cover on the workbench, face down.
  • Places the seat upside down on top of the cover, and
  • Using a staple gun, I first stapled one side of the cover to the seat.
  • Turned the seat 180 degrees, then while pulling the faux leather taut first stapled from the middle of the other side, then while still pulling taut, placed a staple either side.
  • Repeated the process for the other two opposing sides.
  • Trimmed off the corners a bit (but not too much), before folding over and staple each corner in turn.
  • Then quickly trim the edges of the faux leather with a pair of upholstery scissors to tidy up the underside of the seats.

In cutting out the six seat covers from the faux leather I was left with a 5 foot zip that was originally used to secure the faux leather to the sofa that we stripped down to salvage the faux leather covering; which once it’s unstitched will go into my wife’s sewing box of accessories.

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Using the original cover as a template to cut out the replacement covers from the recycled faux leather.Stapling one side first.Pulling the faux leather taut to staple it on the other side of the seat.Repeating the process on the other two sides.Trimming the corners.Tucking and stapling the corners in place.Trimming the underside to give a neat finish.One of the seats reupholstered with the faux leather.Spare 5 foot zip salvaged from the recycled faux leather; for potential recycling.
Using the original cover as a template to cut out the replacement covers from the recycled faux leather.
Using the original cover as a template to cut out the replacement covers from the recycled faux leather.
Stapling one side first.
Stapling one side first.
Pulling the faux leather taut to staple it on the other side of the seat.
Pulling the faux leather taut to staple it on the other side of the seat.
Repeating the process on the other two sides.
Repeating the process on the other two sides.
Trimming the corners.
Trimming the corners.
Tucking and stapling the corners in place.
Tucking and stapling the corners in place.
Trimming the underside to give a neat finish.
Trimming the underside to give a neat finish.
One of the seats reupholstered with the faux leather.
One of the seats reupholstered with the faux leather.
Spare 5 foot zip salvaged from the recycled faux leather; for potential recycling.
Spare 5 foot zip salvaged from the recycled faux leather; for potential recycling.

#4: Polishing Chairs and Seats

With all else done, all that was left was a good polish of the chairs with beeswax polish, and the seat covers with a leather polish.

Beeswax Polish

Using fine grade steel wire wool (to get into the wood grain, and smooth the wood) I rubbed dark stained beeswax polish into the wood grain, and left it for a good 15 minutes to soak in before buffing to a shine.

I always use beeswax and never silicone oil furniture polish because the silicone oil loses its shine when it dries, and being oil attracts dust which means you are forever polishing. Whereas the beeswax, being wax adds a long lasting, durable protective shiny finish to the wood that’s easy to keep clean with a simple wipe.

Leather Polish

The two products I use are ‘Leder-Balsam’, and a ‘Saddle & Leather Conditioning Soap’. Which one I use depends on how effective it is and on the results e.g. I always do a spot clean first to check that the product I’m using doesn’t lift the dye from the leather, and gives it a good shine.

Regardless to which product used, I always use yellow dusters to apply the polish and buff to a shine.

The main difference between the two products I use is that the ‘Leder-Balsam’ just wipes on and wipe off (job done); whereas the ‘Saddle & Leather Conditioning Soap’ is rubbed on, left to dry for 15 minutes and then buffed to a shine.

On this occasion I opted to use the ‘Leder-Balsam’ with good effect.

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The beeswax with steel wire wool, and leather polishes with yellow dusters, I use in polishing and waxing wood and leather.'Leder-Balsam’, and a ‘Saddle & Leather Conditioning Soap’ I use for nourishing and polishing leather. The dark coloured bees was I use on dark wood furniture.Left, one of the seats polished with the ‘Leder-Balsam’ leather polish; and right, another seat before polishing.
The beeswax with steel wire wool, and leather polishes with yellow dusters, I use in polishing and waxing wood and leather.
The beeswax with steel wire wool, and leather polishes with yellow dusters, I use in polishing and waxing wood and leather.
'Leder-Balsam’, and a ‘Saddle & Leather Conditioning Soap’ I use for nourishing and polishing leather.
'Leder-Balsam’, and a ‘Saddle & Leather Conditioning Soap’ I use for nourishing and polishing leather.
The dark coloured bees was I use on dark wood furniture.
The dark coloured bees was I use on dark wood furniture.
Left, one of the seats polished with the ‘Leder-Balsam’ leather polish; and right, another seat before polishing.
Left, one of the seats polished with the ‘Leder-Balsam’ leather polish; and right, another seat before polishing.

Job Done

With the chairs and seats renovated and reupholstered one of the chairs went back to where it was as a sewing chair for my wife in our conservatory; while the three spare chairs went back into the loft for storage.

However, I’ve kept the two spare seats to hand in my shed as they provide added padding to the two iron garden chairs on our patio that I picked up from a dump a while back for just £5 each ($15 in total).

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One of the renovated and reupholstered chairs put back in the conservatory for use as my wife's sewing chair.Using the two spare reupholstered seats with the two iron patio chairs I bought cheaply from a dump; for added comfort.
One of the renovated and reupholstered chairs put back in the conservatory for use as my wife's sewing chair.
One of the renovated and reupholstered chairs put back in the conservatory for use as my wife's sewing chair.
Using the two spare reupholstered seats with the two iron patio chairs I bought cheaply from a dump; for added comfort.
Using the two spare reupholstered seats with the two iron patio chairs I bought cheaply from a dump; for added comfort.

Patina or New Looking

Do you prefer vintage furniture to look their age, or to look new?

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This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2020 Arthur Russ

Your Comments

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    • Nathanville profile imageAUTHOR

      Arthur Russ 

      3 weeks ago from England

      Thanks Denise.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 

      3 weeks ago from Fresno CA

      They look wonderful. What a good job you've done. Very worthwhile it seems to me.

      Blessings,

      Denise

    • Nathanville profile imageAUTHOR

      Arthur Russ 

      3 weeks ago from England

      Thanks Peachy and Liz.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      3 weeks ago from UK

      I have read your article with interest, as our dining chairs could do with recovering. Another well-executed and well-explained project.

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 

      4 weeks ago from Home Sweet Home

      Wow awesome diy way to refurbish furniture

    working

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