How to Create a Backyard Labyrinth One Step at a Time

Updated on May 16, 2017
Seafarer Mama profile image

Seafarer Mama/Karen enjoys writing about spirituality as it is expressed in our everyday lives.

Completed Backyard Labyrinth

Completed backyard labyrinth of sticks and stones
Completed backyard labyrinth of sticks and stones | Source

Introduction

I was challenged this afternoon to create a simple backyard labyrinth, and to take pictures at each stage of the building process to illustrate how it is done. The design I used is one of the simplest to create: a three-circuit path that turns around the center three times before the walker finally enters the heart of the path. The same path is walked from the heart-center back out to the entrance.

The Diagram Illustration

Below is an diagram of the process for building a simple three-circuit labyrinth path. The dark brown lines and dots indicate the basic "seed pattern." The lighter brown lines are the borders to the path in the order they are meant to be created, from the center radiating out in a clockwise motion. The diagram is meant to clarify the stages illustrated in the photo images of the backyard labyrinth built with sticks in the grass between my gardens. The dots are the places where walkers will turn on the path.

Diagram of Movement in Building a Labyrinth

This is a diagram that reflects the movement of creating a simple, 3-circuit labyrinth.
This is a diagram that reflects the movement of creating a simple, 3-circuit labyrinth. | Source

Step One: The Seed Pattern

The "seed pattern" is the "skeleton" of the labyrinth, from which the borders of the walking paths are created.
The "seed pattern" is the "skeleton" of the labyrinth, from which the borders of the walking paths are created. | Source

Step One: A two-fold Process

Choose a Location

The first step for creating a simple backyard labyrinth path is to choose the location that works best for you. A large patch of land that has enough room for you and other walkers to navigate the path into the center and back out again is ideal. Such a space would be around 32 feet long and 32 feet wide.

Create the "Seed Pattern"

The "seed pattern" is like the basic "skeleton" of the labyrinth. For a 3-circuit labyrinth, the "seed pattern" is a cross with dots in the four "quadrants." The cross needs to be at least 2 feet wide in all directions (top, bottom, left and right) and the dots halfway between a vertical line and a horizontal line, with no less than 12 inches on either side. This distance will determine the width of the paths that the walkers will have to move around.

Step Two: The Center

The first part of the labyrinth to create is the center.  It is the shortest distance between a "dot" and a "line."
The first part of the labyrinth to create is the center. It is the shortest distance between a "dot" and a "line." | Source

Step Two: Create the Center of the Labyrinth

The second step of building a labyrinth is to crate the Center. It is the innermost space of the path and the shortest distance between a "line" (stick) and a "dot" (rock, cluster of pine needles, pine cone, or any other natural object that can be easily seen in the grass).

Move Left to Right, or Clockwise

The movement of building the stick borders for the path is clockwise, so creating the borders to the paths will always begin at the left and move toward the right. You will start with a line and end at a dot, then start with a dot and end at a line.

Step Three: The Path Around the Center

The next border to build is for the path that circles closest to the center.
The next border to build is for the path that circles closest to the center. | Source

Step Three: The Path around the Center

After you create your center, it's time to start working out from there. The stick borders will begin to grow longer as you work your way out. Make sure there is at least a foot between the sticks surrounding the center and the stick border for the path adjacent to it. Start from the dot to the left of the center and build the stick border for the section of the path that circles closest to the center, moving to the right until you reach the stick "line" of the cross to the right of the center.

Step Four: The Middle Section of the Path

Step four is the creation of the border for the middle section of the path.
Step four is the creation of the border for the middle section of the path. | Source

Step 4: The Middle

You are almost halfway through the process of building your backyard labyrinth. The middle section of the path is longer than the one you've just created. It begins on the next line to the left of the dot that you just used, or at the left horizontal "stick" line that is perpendicular to the vertical line of the cross. Make sure that it is at least a foot away from the inner stick border. This will give you room to walk the path between the stick borders when the path is finished.

*I hope you are still with me on this. Keep referring to the diagram if you begin to feel lost.

Step 5; The Outermost Path

This picture of step 5 has been rotated to show the clearest illustration of the final border of the path.
This picture of step 5 has been rotated to show the clearest illustration of the final border of the path. | Source

Step 5: The Final Section of the Path

The final stick border you will create is the longest section of the path. This section begins at the dot below the stick line you just used to create the middle section of the path. Keep moving right to land on the bottom vertical line of the cross. Keep the 12 inch distance between this stick border and the middle one so that all of the sections of the path have the same amount of room.

Congratulations!

You have completed building your own backyard labyrinth! Take a step back. Do you see the entrance to the left of where you just landed? Now step in and walk the entire path between the borders you just created. Does it bring you to the center and back out again? if so, it's a success!

Walking My Backyard Labyrinth Path

Tips for Walking a Labyrinth

Here are some tips for walking a labyrinth:

1. Move through the labyrinth in any way you are inspired to. There is no wrong way to walk a labyrinth.

2. Be true to your experience in the here and now.

3. There is only 1 path in and out, so you won't get lost.

4. The labyrinth is an ancient form of walking meditation that often leads to transformation.

5. Your experience on the path is the one you are meant to have.

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 Karen A Szklany

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      • Seafarer Mama profile imageAUTHOR

        Karen A Szklany 

        15 months ago from New England

        Thanks, Peggy W. Glad you found the hub instructive. That is exactly what I created my backyard path for. You are correct that I'll have to remove all of the sticks and stones the next time my husband needs to mow the lawn. ~:0)

      • Seafarer Mama profile imageAUTHOR

        Karen A Szklany 

        15 months ago from New England

        Hey, Bill. Yup, sometimes our backyards don't have any room for anything more. That's when we do research to find a permanent path already built somewhere close to home to walk. You could always create a "desktop" version on an attractive piece of scrapbook paper with a cool pattern.

        Luckily, we have a more permanent labyrinth path in our community, which will still be there long after I collect the sticks and stones that I laid down for my temporary backyard path. ~:0)

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        15 months ago from Houston, Texas

        I can see doing this to lay out a pattern for a more permanent one. Was that your intent? If left like this the first time you have to mow your lawn it will be destroyed. This is none-the-less a good tutorial for how to create one. Thanks!

      • billybuc profile image

        Bill Holland 

        15 months ago from Olympia, WA

        That was a first, in all my years on HP, I've never seen an article about this....I would love to try it but have no idea where I would put it.

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