Home ImprovementRemodelingCleaningGardeningLandscapingInterior DesignHome AppliancesPest ControlDecks & PatiosSwimming Pools & Hot TubsGaragesBasements

Mimosa Trees: Beautiful, Exotic, Aromatic -- and Threatening?

Updated on December 09, 2016
Au fait profile image

C. E. Clark has an unquenchable curiosity for things unique, and loves to bring those things she discovers to the attention of her readers.


Joined: 5 years agoFollowers: 593Articles: 139

Mimosa Trees Are Originally from Asia

The mimosa tree, sometimes called the Persian silk tree, is a legume and can help enrich the soil where it grows. The Persian name means “night sleeper,” and in Japan it is known as the sleeping tree. That is because the bipinnate leaves fold up at night and during rainstorms.

Bipinnate simply means that instead of one undivided leaf, the leaves are separated like those of a fern or a palm frond. The flowers are anywhere from pale to deep pink and form in clusters that look like fine silk threads. They form long pods 5-7 inches long that enclose the seeds.

The technical name, Albizia julibrissin, is native to eastern and southwestern Asia, but does well in most climates here in the states. It is a fast growing ornamental tree that can reach up to 30 feet or slightly more in height.

Mimosa Tree blossom close up
Mimosa Tree blossom close up

Clouds of Profuse Soft Pink Blossoms

Hummingbirds, butterflies, deer, birds and bees, all love mimosa trees. They smell wonderful, and they are my favorite trees in Texas, the first place I am aware of having seen them. I always look forward to their blossoms that usually appear in late spring and last for several weeks.


Some of the places where I have lived in Texas have had mimosa trees right near my front door. One evening about dusk, I was going out to run an errand, and I just happened to look up for some reason. There seemed to be a fairytale like cloud of pink cotton candy above me due to the folding of the mimosa tree’s leaves, making them invisible in the low light. The limited light made the feathery blossoms appear like soft fluff suspended in the air, and the smell was intoxicating.


That vision of the blossoms on the mimosa tree that I saw for the first time in my life that evening has remained with me. That was when I first learned that the leaves of the mimosa fold for the night. I often wish I could have gotten a photo, but it probably would not have turned out well in such low light anyway.

Some Advantages and Disadvantages Of the Mimosa Tree

The mimosa tree is cold weather tolerant and has been known to survive temperatures as cold as -25 degrees Fahrenheit. Nature Hills Nursery in Omaha Nebraska claims the mimosa tree “acts as a natural de-wormer for woodland creatures.”

From my own experience, in addition to being pretty and smelling wonderful, the mimosa trees that have been in my yard provided lots of great shade from the sun.

Unfortunately, the mimosa tree is considered by many horticulturalists, and others, to be an ecological threat. Mimosa trees can grow in a variety of soils, produce large seed crops that travel and spread easily by wind and water, and re-sprout when damaged.

The mimosa, I am told, is a strong competitor to native trees and shrubs in open areas or forest edges. Dense stands of mimosa severely reduce the sunlight and nutrients available for other plants. I must confess, that as prevalent as mimosa trees are here in North Texas, I have never seen a "dense stand" of them anywhere, nor have they ever gotten out of control that I know of. I have never heard anyone complain about them.

WARNING!!

The seedpods are poisonous at all times and the seeds within even more so. Do not allow livestock, pets, or especially children to put the seedpods or seeds in their mouths. They can cause seizures and even death.

Be sure to keep the seed pods away from animals and children. Rake them up as soon as they begin to fall and teach your little ones and all of your children never to put the seedpods in their mouths. Do not assume an older child, or even an adult who may be unfamiliar with mimosa trees knows not to do so.

The flowers and leaves are not toxic and some people cook them and eat them like vegetables or make tea from them, but avoid the seedpods and seeds (John Minton, Gardens of Tomorrow).

Mimosa Trees

Many mimosa trees get much bigger than this one.
Many mimosa trees get much bigger than this one.
Mimosa trees and leaves close up
Mimosa trees and leaves close up
Mimosa trees in the medium size range
Mimosa trees in the medium size range
Mimosa trees in a medium size
Mimosa trees in a medium size
Mimosa tree seedpods are extremely toxic and poisonous to all animals and children.  Do not allow your children or pets to put the seedpods or the seeds into their mouths.
Mimosa tree seedpods are extremely toxic and poisonous to all animals and children. Do not allow your children or pets to put the seedpods or the seeds into their mouths.
Mimosa tree blossoms
Mimosa tree blossoms
Feathery mimosa tree blossom
Feathery mimosa tree blossom
The flowering mimosa tree in the background has grown up most likely from a seed blown to that location by the wind or carried there by water.
The flowering mimosa tree in the background has grown up most likely from a seed blown to that location by the wind or carried there by water.

Mimosa Strigillosa, Not a Tree, but a Ground Cover

It has come to my attention that there is a good deal of confusion regarding mimosa. Some information states that the seedpods are often used as livestock feed while other information says the seedpods and seeds are the most noxious part of the plant, and can at the extreme cause death.

For that reason I am including information about mimosa strigillosa, also called powderpuff mimosa (because of its soft flowers), and also called sunshine mimosa (it prefers full sun but can do quite well in shade).

Mimosa strigillosa or mimosa powderpuff is a ground cover and is indeed used as food for livestock such as cattle and chickens or turkeys, and is equally utilized by wild fowl, deer, caterpillars, and honeybees. No part of this strain of mimosa was listed as toxic, and its parts are regularly utilized as food by both domestic livestock and wild animals.

I am including photographs of this type of mimosa so that my readers may learn to recognize it. It does not grow into trees or bushes and remains fairly close to the ground, usually 3 to 4 inches high, but rarely as much as 12 inches high. The USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) says it is not considered an ecological threat or in any way invasive, yet the University of Florida Lee County Extension office says it “is difficult to control in restricted areas and is best grown with definite boundaries, such as pavement or sidewalks, where it can be more easily edged.”

Mimosa Strigillosa is a very hardy plant, and can withstand many severe conditions. Like the mimosa trees, this ground cover readily adapts to most soil types and can withstand drought very well. While it does grow well from the seeds it produces, the stems also spread and form an overlapping vegetative mat making it an excellent way of controlling erosion.

Please see my list of references below, and by all means check them out for more information on this plant and any questions you may have about it. Whenever you have questions about plants, gardening, lawn care, animals either domestic or wild, pesticides or other chemicals, food, food additives or preservatives, recipes, or a huge variety of different issues and subjects relating to plants or animals, consult your local county agricultural extension office, a free service provided by tax dollars. Every state and most counties have one.

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture

https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_mist2.pdf

University of Florida Lee County Extension

http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/GardenPubsAZ/Mimosa.pdf

FloridaNativeNurseries.org

http://www.floridanativenurseries.org/info/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/SunshineMimosa-May2013.pdf

Mimosa strigillosa or mimosa powderpuff

A close up of the pretty soft flower near the foliage which is very similar to the leaves of the mimosa tree and equally sensitive.  They fold up within seconds of being disturbed.
A close up of the pretty soft flower near the foliage which is very similar to the leaves of the mimosa tree and equally sensitive. They fold up within seconds of being disturbed. | Source
This is how the ground cover mimosa strigillosa or mimosa powderpuff looks when in blossom.
This is how the ground cover mimosa strigillosa or mimosa powderpuff looks when in blossom. | Source
This is how mimosa powderpuff (mimosa strigillosa) looks when not in blossom during the spring/summer months and in some places through the winter also.
This is how mimosa powderpuff (mimosa strigillosa) looks when not in blossom during the spring/summer months and in some places through the winter also. | Source

© 2012 C E Clark

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 weeks ago from North Texas

      Mostafa Shaheen, thank you for reading and commenting on this article. Thanks to you I have added more information about mimosa ground cover to this article.

      It seems there is more than one kind of mimosa. The mimosa ground cover is what some farmers feed their livestock, and the pods and seeds of the mimosa tree that are toxic.

      I have seen pictures of the yellow mimosa, but never seen the real thing. All the mimosa trees here in North Texas that I have actually seen, and there are many, are pink, and yes, the seeds do provide trees that look just like the parent tree.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 weeks ago from North Texas

      IAS, thank you for taking time to read and critic this article and for your well intended suggestions. I like to read the comments on an article as it seems you do too, and so I think your comment will serve your concerns well without my adding anymore stern warnings.

      I have added more information about mimosa to this article, though I believe I have sufficiently let people know that in some parts of the country it is considered invasive. Here in North Texas, I hardly ever see mimosa trees anymore. I don't know what has happened to them. They used to be everywhere in late spring/early summer. They're definitely not invasive here, though there are plenty of other things that are.

      While the trees you suggest as substitutes are plentiful here, and very lovely, they can't replace mimosa trees in my mind. I love mimosas and none of these other trees even capture my attention, though as I said, they are very pretty, and probably less messy too.

      I would always recommend anyone with questions about plants or trees and a great many other things as well, contact their local extension office for information, as there is no charge and the agents there are brimming over with excellent information.

    • Mostafa Shaheen 7 weeks ago

      You mean that this tree gives seeds that grow same as the mother? I heard it never gives the same colour, the flowers are always yellow & pink ones are rare variety.

      In the begining of the article it is said that seeds are used as feed for livestock, then at the end you say it is poisonous!!

    • IAS 7 weeks ago

      Mimosa/Silk Tree (Albizia julibrissin) is identified as a non-native and invasive weed in the US. This is a fact regardless of personal experience or feelings towards them. But your tone seems to dismiss the severity of the threat and expert consensus. The USDA Forest Service and ecology experts agree that it out-competes native species and threatens habitats. It is a "severe" threat in GA, FL, TN and "significant" threat in SC, KY, and VA. http://www.invasive.org/south/seweeds.cfm http://www.na.fs.fed.us/fhp/invasive_plants/weeds/...

      May I suggest two edits to the main article to help with responsible horticulture:

      1) Add a disclaimer plainly stating that mimosa/silk tree is non-native to the US and may be locally designated as invasive or noxious. Please check local jurisdictions before planting.

      2) Suggest alternatives for those that do not want to plant mimosa where it is designated an invasive. At least one commenter suggested Mountain Ash. Also, serviceberry, redbud, redbark dogwood are all beautiful, native, and will help native ecosystems.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 months ago from North Texas

      Bruce, thank you for your comment. I have been in North Texas for over 27 years and I have never seen any dense clumps of mimosa trees either. In fact, for the last couple of years I've hardly seen any mimosa trees in bloom at all. That is when they stand out IMHO, when they are in bloom, and I love them, as I said in this article.

    • Bruce 4 months ago

      As we said in my childhood "say whaaaaaaaaat?"

      Dense clumps of mimosa trees. I grew up in North central Texas with a lot of visits to the east Texas Piney Woods where grandma lived. I have never seen dense clumps of Mimosa. Even if I had how is that different from the dense cumps of any other tree species in Texas?

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 months ago from North Texas

      Colorfulone, thank you for reading and commenting! I'm so glad this article has been useful for you and that you enjoyed it. I recommend you go where there is a nice mimosa that you like and collect a bunch of the seed pods. They should be available about now unless the owners have raked them up. The mimosa trees I have most appreciated were two trees entwined together. Getting them to grow isn't hard. I hope you get one started this summer!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 months ago from North Texas

      JP, thank you for sharing your experiences with mimosa trees. I have had mimosa trees in my yards over the years. I say yards because I lived in different locations and several had mimosa trees. Yes, they do start easily and seedlings will appear in the yard everywhere, but I never found that to be an issue. If they were in a bad location where I didn't want them to grow I just mowed them down along with the grass every couple of days. Here in Texas during the rainy season one must usually cut their grass at least twice a week, sometimes even three times. If the seedlings are mowed regularly (every year or two) they are (IMO) easily managed.

      Yes, in the undeveloped countrywide there are occasionally clumps of mimosa trees, but why is that any more of a problem than a clump of any other kind of tree in that situation? If the land is developed into a housing project for example, every tree, or nearly every tree, regardless of age or type, will be taken out and destroyed. Removing a mimosa tree or a clump of them, is no bigger problem than removing a 100-year old live oak tree. In fact, it's usually easier.

      Once the construction is completed new trees will be planted of whatever kind is preferred, and by the time one's great grandchildren are in the world, those new trees will be almost big enough to provide some shade.

      Up North where I am originally from (now in North Texas, but grew up in central WI), the offending trees were box elder trees. They too grow up like weeds and they are relatively weak so that the slightest wind can damage them or bring their branches down. They are despised by most people because they are messy trees as well. They aren't ever especially pretty that I recall, and never smell so wonderful as mimosas. I think every area of the country has trees native to the area that are less than appreciated.

      Mimosas have all the wonderful things about them described here, where box elders do not, yet they are both 'junk' trees by many people's standards. They aren't strong and long lived like oaks. Your grandfather was right not to let you climb in the mimosas because you might have been injured. They are not good trees to have near a vehicle parking area as they might easily come down on the vehicles parked there in a strong wind.

      I have seen some very large mimosas. One that I recall was about 40 feet or more tall! Very much like one of the tall pine trees except it was a mimosa. Very unusual, and a couple of years ago I went back to the neighborhood where that tree was to get some of its seeds. The tree was gone, removed for the purpose of building new houses. I don't understand why it was removed since it had stood for many many years beside the street and couldn't possibly have been in the way of the builders.

      Pine trees often have very shallow roots and tip over easily in a strong wind storm. Yet they remain popular with a lot of people. Here in North Texas they are highly desirable because they are not native.

      I'm thinking that perhaps your issue with mimosa trees is because you are spoiled. Just a guess since I've never lived in Kentucky. I have lived in 5 different states exposing me to the various problems that tend to be common in a particular area while not being a problem anywhere else.

      The reason I say you may be spoiled is because here in Texas there are lots of problems relating to climate and other naturally occurring things. Only Australia has more nasty poisonous critters (bugs, snakes, etc.) than Texas. We also have more thorns and briars on various foliage and trees than you can imagine. Mesquite trees are hated far more than mimosa trees and they too grow like weeds with tough roots so that cutting them down doesn't mean getting rid of them. So long as a small part of the root remains they will grow back up. Honey locust trees have thorns of the worst sort all over them, too. Holly is a favorite hedge bush for under windows. :)

      Believe me, a mimosa is the most minor of problems compared to mesquite trees and other spiny, thorny, briar covered plants and trees. Entire fields may be covered with nothing but nettles and thorns and briars. Mimosas are at least pretty and they smell divine.

      Yes, some people who aren't aware of the correct name of the tree go by the sounds they hear when other people are talking about them and somewhere along the way mimosa becomes formosa or something else similar in pronunciation. That is where the expression "human beans," comes from also. People repeating what they hear, or what they remember hearing someone else say. Unless something happens to cause a person to look into the correct name of something, that mispronunciation can go on for years and years. That is very common everywhere in this country.

      Thank you again for sharing your memories and experiences with the mimosa tree. I don't think I brought out the fact that they tend to be weak trees, and that can be important when deciding where to put them.

    • colorfulone profile image

      Susie Lehto 4 months ago from Minnesota

      I am so glad I visited this article, because I have wanted to know the name of these "mimosa trees" for several years, ever since I first saw some. I love the leaves, and flowers, but I did not know the seeds are poisonous. I would love to have one of these in my yard now that I know the name. Thank you!

    • JP 5 months ago

      Thanks for the information on these trees.

      My grandparents had several in their wood line in Western Kentucky and I used to love how they smelled. I maintain a fondness for them because they remind me of their little house, nestled in the rural area. I could have swore he called them a 'Formosa'.

      My grandfather truly despised them, however, and said they could root anywhere, to include IN the shingles of the roof, inside cracks of concrete without soil, and directly next to other trees or structures.

      I liked to climb but he didn't allow me to climb them, not for love of them but because he said they were really weak and I'd likely fall.

      Believe you me, it may be that they don't happen to cluster in your area, but I have seen them regularly that way in McCracken County, Kentucky.

    • CV 6 months ago

      I have several mimosas in my yard, including one that started growing on its own behind my mailbox. Since the school bus regularly backed into and knocked over my mailbox, I was happy to let it grow. I need to be diligent in cutting branches that grow over the driveway or the road, but I LOVE to see the bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. My next door neighbor, on the other hand apparently believes he has the right to tell me he is going to take a chainsaw to it. The neighbor on his other side just planted a mimosa sapling in her yard and when the one neighbor came home and saw it, he went ballistic. No one is planting trees to annoy this neighbor and I haven't commented on his fricken burmuda grass taking over my lawn. I admit, it is a little annoying to have to rake up the flowers and seedpods when they fall, but the flowers are worth it.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 6 months ago from North Texas

      J.Stone, thank you for sharing your experience with mimosa trees. I'm so sorry it's causing trouble, but I can imagine a mimosa wouldn't be the best choice for next to a swimming pool. I hope all my readers will take note of that so to save themselves frustrations later. Plant these trees away from your pool and away from your neighbor's pool. That's true of any trees, bushes, flowers, etc. Always think about how they will fit in the area you're planting them in later when they are full grown. Some trees and shrubs, etc., are very messy and require a lot of upkeep. That can be avoided by thinking ahead. I wish I could offer a solution other than removing the tree, but I honestly can't. I hope you and your neighbors can come to an amicable solution. Good luck.

    • J Stone 6 months ago

      my neighbor has mimosa tress....they suck!! yes you can mow them, but they grow back. then you have the stems coming back up. i can hardly walk through my backyard, without tripping over one that is growing back! i have a pool and when the flowers fall they get in the baskets and are really a pain to get out. i heard that there is suppose to be a tree that gives the mimosa a virus that kills it. don't know if that is true...would like to find out if it is, need to do something to keep those damn trees from ruining my yard and pool!!!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 15 months ago from North Texas

      Peggy W., thank you for commenting, and for sharing this hub! Glad you are enjoying some cooler temps too!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 15 months ago from Houston, Texas

      For people wishing to learn about different types of trees, this is a great article about the Mimosa trees. Sharing once again. They are so decorative! Enjoy those cooler temps up in your part of the state. We are certainly enjoying them here in Houston.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 18 months ago from North Texas

      Allyn Lapeska, appreciate your dropping by and sharing your thoughts. However, I don't understand what a "volunyeer tree" is, nor can I imagine why anyone would want to kill these beautiful tees.

      Mimosa trees used to blossom profusely every spring in my North Texas town, but this year I haven't seen a singe mimosa in blossom. I'm wondering what has happened to them. If they are, as some people have suggested, such a nuisance, where have they gone?

      I do not understand why some people consider this beautiful tree invasive. It was always a fairly common part of spring here, but now it seems to have disappeared. I look forward to seeing them and smelling their heavenly scent every spring, but this year, no blossoms. I haven't' seen a single mimosa in blossom this year, and I spend a lot of time driving around this city.

    • Allyn Lepeska 18 months ago

      For all the good comments, they are very difficult to kill especially if you have a volunyeer tree that you want to eliminate.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 20 months ago from North Texas

      Vocalcoach, thank you for reading and commenting on this article and for the votes, share, and such high praise! I've lived with mimosa trees for 28 years and I have never known them to be invasive. Some people seem to think they are, but I have seen no sign of that here in North Texas.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 20 months ago from North Texas

      Shyron, thank you for sharing this article and for the votes. Hope all is well. Blessings . . .

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 20 months ago from North Texas

      Poetryman6969, thank you for stopping by. I love these trees and they grow here, but I have never seen any sign of them being invasive.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 20 months ago from Nashville Tn.

      It's good to learn that the Mimosa tree can be invasive. I didn't know this. Your photos are just gorgeous and along with the information you've provided this hub is a winner! Voted up and across and will share.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 20 months ago

      I am back to read about this beautiful tree again and share with the new comers that may not have seen this.

      Voted up, UABI and shared

      Hope all is well with you.

      Blessings and hugs.

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 20 months ago

      I had never heard that this can be a threatening, invasive species. Thanks for the info.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 22 months ago from North Texas

      Patricia (pstraubie48), thank you for reading and sharing your thoughts on this article! I didn't know about the dangers of this tree either until a reader left a comment about it and I researched it and found it to be true. I still love them. They are so beautiful and smell so fantastic!

      Thank you too, for the votes and share and especially for the angels.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 23 months ago from sunny Florida

      When I saw the title I went "O, NO not something I don't want to know about these gorgeous plants." But alas there is. I did not know this. We had an abundance of them in our yard in Virginia and have them here as well. I had NO idea they could be harmful.

      I will be sharing this, Aufait.

      It is important for everyone to be aware.

      Angels are on the way to you this afternoon ps

      Voted up++++ and shared

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 23 months ago from North Texas

      DeborahDian, thank you for reading and commenting on this article. It is only the seedpods that are dangerous if put in one's mouth. The trees are not dangerous and the seedpods last for only a short while. Rake them up and dispose of them, or plant them and have more beautiful mimosas.

    • DeborahDian profile image

      Deborah Carr 23 months ago from Orange County, California

      I love mimosa trees, but I did not realize they were dangerous. Thanks for letting us know!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      Mila, thank you for reading and commenting on this article. I love mimosas too! So glad you stopped in and shared your thoughts! :)

    • Mila 2 years ago

      .

      Please don't be jealous just because mimosa trees are SO BEAUTIFUL !!!! I love all species of mimosa trees they're so gracious. Especially ones with yellow flowers - smell heavenly & first ones to bloom early in the spring right in the beginning of a March. Mimosa with pink flowers blooming in the middle of hot summer days & it's gorgeous canapé providing us with much needed shade. I have always admire of it's tropical looks like beauty. I love them so much that three-years ago I did even planted myself one young (pink flowers) mimosa tree by the way sprouted itself from a seed in my garden & than I did transplanted it to one of a sidewalk tree peat that was empty & available on my street where I live at in Manhattan N.Y. since than i keep watching it grow, taking care of it, watering etc. I decided to introduce mimosa tree here for everybody to see, enjoy & appreciate its beauty for many years to come. Let this kind of beauty to be invasive I don't mind that. Always will love them no matter how much people are trying to discourage others from planting mimosa.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      Sujaya Venkatesh, thank you for stopping by. The mimosa has no thorns.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      Diane Ayers, thank you for stopping by. There are a couple of close-ups of mimosa flowers in this article. If those are not to your liking you can always go to Google Images and search there. Good luck!

    • sujaya venkatesh profile image

      sujaya venkatesh 2 years ago

      flowers come with thorns

    • diane ayers 2 years ago

      I am looking for a close up view of the mimosa blossom. I love the mimosa tree blossom and I want to have it tatooed on my leg and want the picture to show the tattoo artist. If anyone can please post a picture for me??????

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      Linnie Livingston, thank you for reading and commenting on this article. Very much appreciate the information you have shared regarding the toxicity of the seed pods.

      I have just read about how they are similar to the poisons in some shellfish and that the seeds themselves can cause seizures. Good to know and I will be updating this article accordingly in the near future.

      In the meantime your comment will be a warning to people that this is a serious negative of these trees. So sad, but we do need to know, and I'm so glad you shared this information.

    • Linnie Livingston 2 years ago

      I hate to be a kill joy about these beautiful trees, but if you have pets or kids that chew on things, they, can be highly toxic. When the pods are at their peak in August and September is the most dangerous time. My friend almost lost her puppy due to chewing on the pods. She ended up in emergency with IVs in her . It took some time and research to figure out the mimosa tree was the culprit.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you Deborah-Diane, for stopping by and commenting on this article. I'm glad you like these trees. They're one of my favorite kinds of tree, so pretty in the late evening especially.

      Mimosa trees are messy and they do grow up easily. That offends some people, but of course it isn't the only tree that is messy or easily spread. For some reason some people dislike their ease of growing up, and it's understandable that they might not like their messiness because it can mean more yard work, but sometimes life isn't neatly packaged . . .

    • Deborah-Diane profile image

      Deborah-Diane 2 years ago from Orange County, California

      I know some people do not like mimosa trees, but I think they are beautiful. I was just driving past a shopping center this morning that has several beautiful ones around the perimeter. Lovely.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      mztwisst, thank you for stopping by.

    • mztwisst 3 years ago

      pretty as the flours are, I bet the bark is better!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you Moonlake, for pinning this hub! I think these are fairly easy trees to grow which is why they scare some people into thinking they're invasive. They will grow like weeks, but one has the discretion to mow them down if they wish . . .

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      Pinned this to my garden hub. I use to have small ones in the house.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you moonlake for reading, voting on, and sharing this hub. Some references I've found say they can withstand the cold winters up where you are while others say they can't. I may get my sister to try an experiment if I can find some seedpods and send them to her. Most people here clean them up as soon as they fall, so getting my hands on some may not be so easy, but if I can, I'm going to send her some to see what happens. The only expense involved is the postage for the seeds. She lives in the Wausau area. No telling how long it will take for me to find the seedpods though!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you pstraubie48 for reading this article and sharing your experience with mimosa trees. Some trees are messy and if they're in your yard you may have to keep a hose connected close by and ready to rinse your car off before going out. :)

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      I love mimosa and don't have to worry about them being invasive here. We can't grow them. I wish we could I would have one in my yard. Enjoyed your hub voted up and shared.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      The lovely mimosa...we had them on our property when I was a little girl and my Daddy despised them especially the one that was near his car. It dropped its beautiful blossoms on the car and it was a mess.

      However I loved them then and love them still and wish I had one in my yard today.

      Thanks for sharing. Angels are on the way ps

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you Shyron, for all the great votes, for the nice compliments, the pinning and the sharing. These really are beautiful trees and I haven't any idea why some people think they are invasive.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Healthyannie, thank you for commenting on this hub! So sorry to hear about your allergies. I, too, have allergies to so many things that I think I will end up living in my own bubble one of these days, but so far as I know mimosa trees are not yet an issue. Glad you could at least enjoy the photos.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

      Au fait, I think this is the most beautiful tree of all. This is a wonderful hub and the pictures are wonderful, voted up Useful, Beautiful, Awesome and the bit, shared and pinned.

    • Healthyannie profile image

      Healthyannie 3 years ago from Spain

      I love the Mimosa tree but they give me Hay fever so I will have to look at your beautiful pics. Thank you.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Hasta luego . .

    • samowhamo profile image

      samowhamo 3 years ago

      Well I am going to close down for bed now good night Au Fait.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      They are pretty.

    • samowhamo profile image

      samowhamo 3 years ago

      Yes those are the same trees they grow in both D.C. Japan and from what I have noticed here in Ohio but I don't know where else they are very beautiful.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      If you're talking about the cherry blossoms in D.C. they're very pretty, but I even like honey locust trees, so a tree has to be pretty awful before I don't appreciate it.

    • samowhamo profile image

      samowhamo 3 years ago

      Just curious what do you think of those cherry blossom trees I mentioned earlier the Japanese call them Sakura trees.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Sam, if you read the hub you would understand the meaning of the title. Some people think these trees take over and kill other trees out. Not true from my esperience.

    • samowhamo profile image

      samowhamo 3 years ago

      Sorry if I misunderstood the title said threatening but as I said I am not an expert on botany.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you for checking out this article. Mimosa trees are not deadly and they smell wonderful in blossom. They're always beautiful, but especially at dusk when the leaves close and the blossoms all together look like soft cotton candy clouds.

    • samowhamo profile image

      samowhamo 3 years ago

      I have never heard of these tree's before but then again botany is not my area of expertise ha ha they do look nice though sometimes the most beautiful things in nature are the most deadly. I prefer cheery blossom tree's though like what you see in Japan especially when the petals fall every where it looks almost as though they are flying.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Sharkye11, thank you for stopping by and sharing your experience with mimosa trees. Glad you enjoyed!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment Shyron. Mimosa trees are one of my favorites and they've just started blooming a week or so ago!

    • Sharkye11 profile image

      Jayme Kinsey 3 years ago from Oklahoma

      Beautiful photos! I adore mimosa trees, but they can be a nuisance. We used to have a huge mimosa next to our home, and it made the BEST climbing tree. We always kept the seedlings cleaned up around it. The sprouted quite well down in SE Oklahoma. I have one here on the back of my property, and have been trying to grow a new one in the yard. As easy as they are to sprout, they are not always so easy to grow.

      Love this hub!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thanks for stopping by Julie. The mimosas are just beginning to bloom here in N. Texas. I always look forward to their flowers.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

      I love this hub, I love trees, with the exception of the Devil Tree.

      I do not know why but when I hear about the Mimosa an overwhelming sadness comes over me. I know that I associate it with something sad, but can't remember what it is, I wish I could remember.

    • Julie 3 years ago

      We love our Mimosa trees. They live to be approximately 30 to 40 years!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you for pinning this article Peggy W!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Au fait,

      Now that I have a Pinterest account, I am going to pin this interesting hub to my trees board.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you Deborah-Diane for reading and commenting on this hub and for sharing your experience in regard to mimosa trees here in Texas.

    • Deborah-Diane profile image

      Deborah-Diane 3 years ago from Orange County, California

      We used to live in North Texas (in Dallas), and I remember seeing a few mimosa trees, but not an overwhelming number. In fact, I usually only saw ones that were obviously intentionally planted to be decorative, so I agree with you that they do not seem overly invasive. They are lovely, and I always enjoyed seeing them. Thanks for another one of your informative articles!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you Angelo52 for reading and commenting on this hub. Like I said, we have these trees all over here in North Texas and I travel all over the county 5 days a week, yet I hardly see a mimosa, so how invasive can they be? Maybe it's a different kind of mimosa that is invasive because there are yellow ones too. Thanks for stopping by!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you rajan jolly, for reading, commenting, voting on, and especially for sharing this hub. Thank you for adding the additional information also -- I didn't know the leaves would close from touching because I've never touched them nor has anyone I know done so. I only knew they would close at dusk/dark and when it rains.

    • Angelo52 profile image

      Angelo52 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Seems like an interesting tree. True it is an invader to the USA but so are many of the plants we find in our landscape. Re-arranging the world, whether plants or animals, to suit human needs without thinking of the consequences seems to what humans do. Pretty flowers and good shape. Good article.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 3 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Beautiful pictures and useful information. Thanks.

      The mimosa pudica closes its leaves when touched.

      Voted up and shared.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you for stopping by Shyron and so glad you enjoy this hub! I love mimosa trees. I think they're one of the most amazing things I discovered here in Texas.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Peggy W, thank you for reading, commenting, voting on, and especially for sharing this hub! I didn't know they were invasive either until I ran into several articles in my research. I'm still not convinced because they certainly don't seem to be invasive here in North Texas. They are messy trees. Hope you get a chance to smell them.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

      Au fait this is such a beautiful hub, I just love the pictures.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Tillsontitan, I appreciate all the trouble you have had trying to leave comments on this hub. 2 of the 3 made it through, but one of them didn't for some reason. Who knows why? I know I have had trouble leaving comments in response to comments left on my own hubs, as well as issues with leaving comments on other hubbers hubs from time to time. A few hours ago this site was down completely, and I was in the middle of commenting on one of your hubs at the time! It would seem there are gremlins in the mix somewhere.

      Regardless of why strange things have been happening, I very much appreciate your efforts and the time you take to address my hubs!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      mperrottet, thank you for reading, commenting and voting on this hub and especially for sharing it! I travel all over Denton County Texas regularly and I have not yet seen where mimosa trees have taken over or threatened any other vegetation. If they are doing so, I don't know where. Thanks again for taking time . . .

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 3 years ago

      Au fait I love the beauty and the fragrance of these beautiful trees.

      Thank you for sharing

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      Tillsontitan, thank you for reading, commenting, and voting on this hub! Glad you enjoyed it. You should get some seeds and grow one of these trees up there. They're supposed to be able to handle pretty cold winters.

      I know how frustrating commenting can be sometimes. Mainly when I respond to comments, my responses don't always show up in the feed, and sometimes it takes several tries before they do. Since my own responses to comments on my own hubs don't always show up like they should, I then wonder if they were recorded on other people's hubs when I leave them. It can be especially frustrating if they hold comments 'til they're ready to approve them. Then a person might never know if they were received or not.

      I've got all of yours (I think) and I appreciate them and all the effort you've made to make sure they came through. Thank you for that too!

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      This is my third try at leaving a comment on this interesting hub Au fait. We've all heard about Mimosa, but thanks to you we now KNOW about Mimosa!

      Voted up, useful, and interesting. (I hope the third time is the charm and you see this comment.)

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 3 years ago from North Texas

      leahlefler, thank you for reading and commenting on this hub! I think it would be worth a try to see if the mimosa could tolerate your NY winters. You need to visit TX and pick up a few of the mimosa seed pods for souvenirs. ;)

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      " cloud of pink cotton candy "...that's what I'm going to think of every time I see one of these beautiful trees. I have to admit, I didn't know much about them and we don't see too many of them here in the northeast, I actually can't think of any. Thanks for the information and the beautiful pictures.

      Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • mperrottet profile image

      Margaret Perrottet 3 years ago from Pennsauken, NJ

      Mimosa trees are so delicate and lovely it's hard to think of them as dangerous and invasive. Thanks for this wonderfully written article and the beautiful pictures. Voted up, useful, interesting and shared.

    • leahlefler profile image

      leahlefler 3 years ago from Western New York

      Oh, wow - I didn't realize these trees were cold hardy! My grandmother had one in California when I was growing up - I'll have to see if I can get one in Western NY - our winters are rarely colder than -10, so the tree should survive. I love the pink blossoms!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Au fait,

      Mimosa trees are truly beautiful when in bloom. I have obviously seen them in places around Texas but have obviously never been close enough to them to detect their fragrance. They can be a bit messy when shedding their flowers, but the same can be said for many other ornamental trees. I did not realize that they are considered invasive. UUI votes and sharing.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you for reading and commenting sgbrown! Ever since I learned from my research that mimosas are considered invasive I have been looking for a situation that looks that way. Have to say, there aren't that many mimosas here compared to other kinds of trees, and I travel over Denton County Texas for 6 hours a day M-F and I do see the occasional mimosa, but that's all it is -- occasional. Have had them in my yard several times at rent houses and not once have they ever taken over with their seedlings. I love them and they smell wonderful!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you for commenting and sharing. Mimosas live here in TX where I am, but I have not seen that many of them despite the fact that I spend 6 hours daily driving all over Denton county, mostly in suburbs and undeveloped areas between the suburbs. If mimosas are invasive, it isn't in Denton County TX.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      Mimosas smell heavenly. As for their being invasive . . . my job requires me to travel all over Denton County and I see very few mimosas. If they are truly invasive, then why aren't there more of them? My travels are usually for 6 hours daily and I go everywhere. Further, any tree can damage the foundation of a house or other building if they're too close, not just the mimosa tree.

      Thank you for reading and commenting Shyron. Very much appreciated.

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      bethperry: Thank you for taking time to read and comment and to share your views. I love mimosas too, invasive or not!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you Healthy Pursuits, for reading and commenting. Sharing your experience is much appreciated!

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      Melissa: Thank you for taking time to read and comment! Much appreciated.

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 4 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      I love mimosa trees, they are so pretty. We had 2 in our yard when I was a child in Texas. I have always wanted one where I live now. I didn't realize they were invasive. I don't think that will change my mind, they can "invade" all they want on our 40 acres. I may look for one this week-end! Very interesting and beautiful hub. Voted up, interesting and beautiful. Have a great day! :)

    • Au fait profile image
      Author

      C E Clark 4 years ago from North Texas

      Thank you RTalloni for taking the time to read and comment on my hub! Very much appreciated. Agree with you. Wish it were possible for people to smell these trees. They are sooooo good.

    • Brett.Tesol profile image

      Brett.Tesol 4 years ago from Somewhere in Asia

      definitely a cool tree! A shame that it dominated so much. Nice hub though ;-)

      Shared, up and interesting.

    • Shyron E Shenko profile image

      Shyron E Shenko 4 years ago

      Au Fait, Your photos are awesome, I would love to have one, but don't want one the would damage foundations or crowd out other trees. I have never seen on or smelled their fragrance, but your pictures make me long to see them when they are in bloom.

      I love trees, and thank you for the info on this tree.

    • bethperry profile image

      bethperry 4 years ago from Tennesee

      Au Fait, I have loved Mimosas since I was a kid and my brother and I had a swing hanging from the huge one out in my grandmother's front yard. It stood there until my parents finally had it cut down due to an ant infestation.

      But yes, they can be invasive. When we bought our home there was a Mimosa in the back yard. Ever since little roots from that one tree has continually popped up around the yard, and worse, right beside the house. If they aren't cut they damage the exterior. But I still can't bring myself to cut down that Mother tree. She is gorgeous.

      Great hub and love the photos! Voting up.

    • Healthy Pursuits profile image

      Karla Iverson 4 years ago from Oregon

      I love mimosa trees! You've done a great job of describing how beautiful they are. I had to make a decision about five years ago about what tree to plant in front of my house. I wanted a mimosa in the worst way, However, after hearing that they are invasive in a temperate climate, I sadly changed my mind. Finally I chose a Mountain Ash, so the birds would have more food from nature in the winter. Now it gives me red berries at Christmas time, and the chickadees love it. I can watch them swarm for the berries from my dining room window. So now I've come to love this tree.

    • Melissa A Smith profile image

      Melissa A Smith 4 years ago from New York

      I love these, they are not invasive if it's too cold. Mine in shade however never blooms.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 4 years ago from the short journey

      Though they can be invasive, they are an amazing tree. Thanks for a practical look at the mimosa. Your photos are beautiful, but there's just one problem. They are not scratch and sniff!

    Click to Rate This Article