String Trimmer (Strimmer) Won't Work: 2-Stroke Engine and Carburetor Troubleshooting

Updated on October 1, 2018
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Eugene is a qualified control/instrumentation engineer Bsc (Eng) and has worked as a developer of electronics & software for SCADA systems.

Typical gas string trimmer
Typical gas string trimmer | Source

String Trimmer Won't Start?

String trimmers, also known as line trimmers, weed eaters, weed whackers, strimmers, and whipper snippers, can be troublesome garden tools. Difficulty in starting is often due to an issue with the carburetor (carburator).

In this article, I offer a list of troubleshooting questions to help you find the problem. I strip and clean a carburetor and point out where problems can arise.

While I specifically deal with the carburetor from a trimmer, these tips will also help for carburetors on other two-stroke engine-powered machines (such as brush cutters, hedge cutters/trimmers, chainsaws, consaws, and leaf blowers).

If you found this guide was useful and it helped resolve the issue with your trimmer, please take the time to share it on social media, Facebook, Pinterest etc.

Common Reasons Why a String Trimmer Won't Start

  • A dirty or cracked spark plug
  • The magneto isn't generating a spark
  • Improper venting of the cap on the gas tank
  • A blocked fuel filter
  • A very dirty air filter
  • Clogging of the carburetor from gum deposits due to gas being left in the tank over winter
  • A worn diaphragm or pump in the carburetor
  • A stuck valve in the primer bulb or a leaking bulb
  • A blocked spark arrestor screen

Usually though, the problem is caused by parts which wear out or become compromised in some way in the carburetor. Before jumping to conclusions and starting to troubleshoot, follow a proper start sequence.

Two-stroke carburetor.
Two-stroke carburetor. | Source

What's a Carburetor and How Does It Work?

All two-stroke engines on trimmers (and also four-stroke engines on lawn mowers, generators, and other small equipment) are fitted with a device called a carburetor (often shortened to carb in North America or carby in Australia). Engines in older cars and other gas-powered vehicles also had a carburetor before the introduction of fuel injection in the 1980s.

The function of the carburetor is to mix a mist of gasoline and air together to form an explosive mixture which is burned in the cylinder of the engine.

  1. Air is drawn by suction from the engine through a tube in the carburetor. This tube, about 1/2 to 3/4 inch in diameter on a small engine, has a narrowed section called the venturi.
  2. As air flows through the venturi, it increases in speed, and pressure drops below atmospheric. The drop in pressure causes fuel to be drawn through a jet into the air flowing through the venturi.
  3. This jet works exactly like the spray nozzle on a garden hose and a mist or spray of gas is created, which mixes with the airflow. (Paint spray guns used off a compressor work on the same principle). The mixture flows out of the carburetor and into the crankcase through the intake manifold.
  4. Finally, it is transferred to the cylinder where it is burnt to produce power.

Two-Stroke (Two-Cycle or 2T) Engines

Two-stroke (also known as two-cycle or 2t) engines are used on most hand-held garden power tools. They have several advantages over four-stroke engines (like the one in your car or lawn mower).

Firstly, there is no sump or reservoir on the underside, filled with oil for lubricating the engine. A sump would be impractical considering that such hand-held power tools may be used upside down and at all angles. Small four-stroke engines are fairly "primitive" and don't have an oil pump, relying on a "splasher" or "flicker" on the connecting rod to throw oil from the sump onto the piston and other moving parts. So this system would be ineffective on a two-stroke engine if it was used upside down.

To lubricate these type of engines, you need to pre-mix oil with gas. The absence of a sump and its oil content reduces weight. Also two-stroke engines don't have valves, a cam shaft, or the other bits and pieces which operate the valves. Instead, they have "ports" or entry and exit slots for fuel/air mixture and exhaust gases. This further reduces weight. So the result is a lighter machine, a higher power-to-weight ratio than a four-stroke, no requirement for an oil change, and less working parts to wear out or fail.

The greatest disadvantage of these types of engines is that because oil is burned in the combustion chamber or cylinder along with the gas, they produce smoke and are smelly (which causes pollution in cities where scooters and motorbikes are the main means of transport). Low smoke two-stroke oils are available, however, which somewhat cut down on emissions.

How a Two Stroke Engine Works

Two-stroke trimmer engine.
Two-stroke trimmer engine. | Source

How to Fix a String Trimmer

I have a bargain basement trimmer I bought in a large home store. Unfortunately, spare parts are unlikely to be widely available for repairing such a model (although the store may be able to get them from their supplier), which was probably mass produced in China. Still, it was cheap and I've got years of use out of it with no engine problems (except the protection guard for the line broke and I had to make a new one).

If you want a machine to last for 10 years or more, go for a model by a well-known manufacturer such as McCulloch, Stihl, Husqvarna, Poulan Pro, Oleo-Mac, Ryobi, Craftsman, Weedeater, Flymo, or Honda. That way, you can be certain of getting service information, spare parts, and after-sale support.

Warning: Gas Is Flammable

Gas (petrol) is flammable. Keep all sources of ignition away from where you are working on an engine. This includes naked flames, cigarettes, hot surfaces, and tools which generate sparks (e.g. angle grinders). Rags soaked in gas can ignite, so dispose of them safely. Store gas in metal cans or plastic containers made for the purpose.

How to Mix Fuel for Two-Stroke Engines

Don't use four-stroke motor oil in your engine. It contains additives which can contaminate the cylinder over time and also it can tar up the piston. Two-stroke oil is designed to burn as cleanly as possible with the fuel.

  • Lubrication of two-stroke engines is effected by mixing two-stroke oil with gas before use.
  • In general, the oil-to-gas ratio for a two-stroke engine should be 1:50. This equates to 20 ml per liter (litre) or 2.6 fluid ounces (US) per gallon (US).
  • Some manufacturers recommend a 1:25 ratio for their engines, so check your manual.
  • 1:40 or 1: 30 is probably a good compromise (i.e. more oil).
  • Try to avoid fuels which contain ethanol as this absorbs moisture over time, oxidizing metal surfaces.
  • Swirl the mixture in the container for a few seconds to mix it thoroughly.
  • You can normally buy 100 mL plastic bottles of two-stroke oil which is sufficient to make up 5 litres of mix. In the US, 2.6 fluid ounce bottles of oil are available for making up a gallon of mix. If you do a lot of trimming, obviously it's more economical to buy a larger bottle of oil.

Gas and Two-Stroke Oil Needed For a 50:1 Ratio

Amount of Fuel Mixture Required
Gasoline/Petrol
Two Stroke Oil
1 Litre
1 Litre
20 ml
5 Litres
5 Litres
100 ml
1 US Quart
1 US Quart
0.64 US Fluid Ounces (about 1.5 tablespoons))
1 US Gallon
1 US Gallon
2.6 US Fluid Ounces
Oil mix ratios. For a 25:1 ratio, double the amount of oil

Conversion of Capacity Units

1 US pint = 16 US fluid ounces = 473ml

1 US gallon = 3.79 litres

1 UK imperial gallon = 4.54 litres

1 UK gallon = 1.2 US gallons

1 UK imperial pint = 20 UK fluid ounces = 568ml

Priming the Carburetor on a Two Stroke Engine

  • Before you start your engine, you need to prime it. The priming bulb sucks fuel up into the carburetor which may be empty from the last time the engine was run.
  • The priming bulb must be pushed about ten times to suck in sufficient fuel. Make sure there is enough fuel in the tank before you do this so that the filter on the end of the fuel line is submerged and you're not just sucking air into the priming bulb.
  • The engine only needs to be primed again after a tank refill, if it has been a long time since the trimmer has been used and the carburetor has drained, or if the trimmer was used upside down for an extended period and the engine cut out.
  • The filter on the fuel line is normally able to move around in the tank so that even when the trimmer is used upside down, the filter falls down into fuel.
  • However, if there isn't much fuel in the tank, sometimes this doesn't work, so the intake line can get drained and filled with air as the engine uses up fuel, requiring a re-prime. Try to keep the tank at least half full.

Starting a Trimmer, Hedge Cutter, or Chain Saw Properly

  1. Rest the machine on the ground, clear of any debris.
  2. If the engine has a separate on/off switch, move it to the on position, otherwise move the choke control from the off position to the full choke position
  3. Prime the engine as described above
  4. Pull the starter cord and if the engine doesn't attempt to start after a few pulls, try re-priming.
  5. Once the engine runs, wait until it cuts out or for about ten seconds, whichever comes first. If it only gives a "kick", try pulling the cord again
  6. Then turn off the choke and allow the engine to continue running
  7. If the engine won't start, repeat the process from the start by turning the choke back on, priming the engine, and pull-starting.
  8. If after several attempts at starting, nothing happens, the engine may have flooded. Leave it for about 10 minutes for fuel to evaporate before attempting a re-start.
  9. If the engine has been run in the last 10 minutes or so and is hot, you don't need to turn the choke back on before re-starting.

Note: There is some variability in the starting procedure for this type of engine. Some engines don't have a primer bulb. Also, an engine may have both a partial and full choke position. The choke may be arranged so that you start the engine without squeezing the throttle and revving it, only doing so when it fires up. Revving then automatically knocks off the choke. If possible, check your manual for details.

Try Pouring Some Gas into the Cylinder

  1. A traditional way of getting an engine to start is to pour a little gas into the spark plug hole. I emphasize a little, about a thimble full or a soda bottle capful. Try not to spill it on the outside of the engine.
  2. Screw the plug back in and start the engine on full choke. This often helps to get a stubborn engine running. Don't try this if the engine has been running and hot, because the gas could potentially ignite if you spill it.
  3. A less messy option, if you have a section of fuel or narrow gauge air line, is to dip it in gas to a depth of about 2 or 3 inches, put your thumb over the top, stick the end of the line into the plug hole, and take away your thumb, allowing the gas to run out.

Empty Fuel Lines Can Cause Difficult Starting

If you run the engine until it cuts out before re-filling, the fuel lines will have thoroughly emptied out. Remember you need to push the primer button 5 to 10 times before starting the engine again. If the check valve in the primer button isn't the best, this can cause difficult starting. If the button is working properly, it should feel "spongy".

Keep pressing it until it fills with gas and most of the air bubbles are gone. You can check whether the primer is working properly by partially filling the tank with gas but allowing the end of the line without the filter to remain above the surface (the line with the filter should be submerged). When you repeatedly push the primer button, gas should flow out of the line without the filter.

When undoing the spark plug, hold the wrench with two hands so that it doesn't slip off the plug and damage it.
When undoing the spark plug, hold the wrench with two hands so that it doesn't slip off the plug and damage it. | Source

Maybe There's a Problem With the Spark Plug?

Could be!

  1. Remove the plug with a spark wrench.
  2. Push the plug lead back onto it and hold the metal part of the plug against the engine body. This can be somewhat difficult to do with these engines, as a plastic cowl usually covers the engine and it can be difficult to access the metal body. You could use a bolt, small tin, or whatever to make contact.
  3. Switch on the starter switch, hold the plug by the rubber booth at the end of the spark lead (or maybe a clothes peg) and pull the starter cord/rope. This can be difficult to do single-handed unless you are an octopus, so find a trusty assistant to help you!
  4. A healthy spark should be blue. It might be difficult to see the spark in bright sunlight, so move the trimmer into the shade or indoors. If there's no sign of a spark, try a new one or even a plug from a lawn mower (to test the ignition circuit is okay) before you attempt any more in depth troubleshooting. (Don't use a plug which is longer than the original one as it could hit the piston!)

Use a socket or whatever to make contact with the body of the engine when testing for a spark.
Use a socket or whatever to make contact with the body of the engine when testing for a spark. | Source

Can a Dirty or Cracked Spark Plug Prevent Starting?

If the plug won't spark, there are two possible causes:

Cracked Plug

A crack in the ceramic insulation of the plug can cause the spark to take a "short cut" through the insulation so that it doesn't jump the gap where it's supposed to do

Dirty Plug

If the ceramic insulation which surrounds the central electrode is excessively covered in soot, again this can short out the spark so that it won't jump to the outer electrode (the one connected to the threads). You can clean soot off with a tooth brush, or better still a "toothbrush" style, small wire brush. Then scrub the electrodes using the toothbrush in a small bowl/coffee jar lid full of gas.

A "toothbrush" style wire brush is useful for cleaning soot from a spark plug.
A "toothbrush" style wire brush is useful for cleaning soot from a spark plug. | Source
Hairline cracks in the insulation of plugs can short out high voltage and result in no spark across the gap.
Hairline cracks in the insulation of plugs can short out high voltage and result in no spark across the gap. | Source

Could There Be a Problem With the Ignition Module?

As explained in great detail in my article Lawn Mower Won't Start? - Top 10 Mower Troubleshooting Tips, small engines have a device called a magneto for creating a spark at the plug to ignite the fuel/air mixture in the cylinder. This is a cross between a transformer and generator and creates voltages of about 10kV. These are normally electronic capacitor discharge ignition modules (CDI) on modern trimmers, so there are no points to be cleaned or a condenser (capacitor) to replace.

If you don't get a spark at the plug and have tried a new plug and checked for loose wiring without success, this module may be at fault and need to be replaced.

Alternatively, the embedded magnets on the flywheel may have weakened, or the gap between poles of the coils and flywheel may be off. This should be approximately 0.006 inches.

Electronic ignition module - When the kill switch is open circuit (on position), engine runs. Closing the switch cuts the engine.
Electronic ignition module - When the kill switch is open circuit (on position), engine runs. Closing the switch cuts the engine. | Source

Testing the Kill Switch

The kill switch shorts out the magneto to cut out the engine. Dirty or corroded contacts usually result in an inability to stop the engine rather than a problem with starting.

You can check the resistance of the switch with a multimeter set to the ohms range. If you don't know how to use one, read How to Use a Digital Multimeter (DMM) to Measure Voltage, Current, and Resistance.

This should change from infinite resistance when the switch is in the on position (when the switch is disconnected from the engine) to less than an ohm in the off position. Normally, a switch should have a high resistance when off, but remember in this arrangement, "off" refers to the engine switched off and the switch contacts closed.

Ideally, you should detach one of the leads from the switch when testing the resistance in the on position because the resistance of the ignition module in parallel will affect readings. If the resistance is several tens of kilo-ohms, however, this is okay because it means the switch is opening and not shorting out the ignition module.

Remove the switch with a screwdriver
Remove the switch with a screwdriver | Source
Set the meter to the "ohms" range. Resistance should be less than 1 ohm with the switch in the off position. Ideally you should detach one of the wires from the switch when testing.
Set the meter to the "ohms" range. Resistance should be less than 1 ohm with the switch in the off position. Ideally you should detach one of the wires from the switch when testing. | Source

Multimeters from Amazon

Useful for checking voltage, current, continuity, and fuses. You can buy a cheap meter like Innova which will do the job adequately, or alternatively a more expensive model like the Fluke 113 which is recommended for general purpose home/auto maintenance. By paying more you get better accuracy, plus the option of getting the meter calibrated/repaired.

What About the Cap and Check Valve on the Gas Tank?

Unlike lawn mowers and other such yard equipment which is normally used in one orientation, trimmers, chainsaws, and hedge cutters must be used at all sorts of angles.

A lawn mower has a vent in the gas tank cap to allow air into the tank as gas leaves it. If the tank wasn't vented to atmospheric pressure, this would restrict the flow of gas out of the tank. (Turn a large soda bottle filled with water upside down and you'll see what I mean).

55 gallon oil drums also have a secondary bung which needs to be loosened to vent the drum, enabling smooth flow from the main outlet during emptying. On a lawn mower, the vent is just a hole with a fiber or plastic baffle inside the cap to stop gas splashing out. This isn't good enough on a trimmer if the tank is turned upside down, so a one way valve (check valve) is used.

This valve may be fitted in the cap of the gas tank or on the body of the tank itself.

The valve allows air in but gas can't leak back out. This could get clogged with dirt, so try starting the engine with the cap slightly loosened (keep the tank upright) to see if it makes any difference.

To clean the valve, gently slide a small flat blade jeweler's screwdriver into it to make sure its clear (make sure it's small diameter to prevent damage). I couldn't get access to the back of this valve because a fuel filter was pushed into place. There wasn't a problem with the valve so I didn't go any further.

On my trimmer, the one-way valve is fitted in the gas tank cap.
On my trimmer, the one-way valve is fitted in the gas tank cap. | Source
This valve holder has a filter at the back. It seemed to be difficult to prise out and may have been bonded to the holder, so I left it in place.
This valve holder has a filter at the back. It seemed to be difficult to prise out and may have been bonded to the holder, so I left it in place. | Source

Could the Fuel Filter Be Dirty?

Possibly, although I've never had any problems with clogged filters on my hedge cutter, chain saw, or trimmer, and they have have had hundreds of hours of use.

Whether the filter gets clogged depends on the quality of the gas you get. If you don't take care when filling the tank and allow crap such as dirt and sand into it, it will inevitably end up in the filter. Impurities in two-stroke oil probably accumulate in the filter also.

If you can prime the engine and fuel can be seen to return to the tank via the line without the filter, the filter is unlikely to be clogged.

The filter is located on the end of the intake fuel line and is replaced rather than cleaned (although you could try removing it, wash in hot soapy water, rinse, and allow it to dry before replacing).

Magnetic parts tray. A cloth also stops parts rolling about.
Magnetic parts tray. A cloth also stops parts rolling about. | Source

Now It's Time to Remove the Carburetor From the Engine

Your carburetor may be somewhat different from the one pictured, but the basic principle is the same.

  • A section of membrane in the carburetor acts as a pump. Pulses of low and high pressure from the engine crankcase move this membrane backwards and forwards, and this sucks gas from the tank to a reservoir pocket in the carburetor.
  • Reed valves act as check/one way valves to stop gas flowing backwards.
  • A metering needle or needle valve operated by a diaphragm regulates flow into the reservoir pocket and shuts off flow when the pocket is full.
  • A primer bulb is included which helps to suck fuel up into the carburetor before starting. Without this, the starter cord would have to be pulled multiple times to fill the carburetor with gas. Some carburetors don't have this primer button arrangement.
  • It's a good idea to lay out parts on a piece of cloth or old towel to stop them rolling about during dismantling. You can also store them in a magnetic parts tray.
  • Don't work outdoors like I did while disassembling. This was only to facilitate taking photos in good lighting conditions. If you drop small parts on a lawn, you will probably never find them!
  • If you have an air compressor and blowgun, blow away any grime form the outside of the carburetor before removing. Do this before removing the air filter and fuel lines to avoid blowing grime into the carburetor or bursting the diaphragm inside it.

Drain the gas tank.
Drain the gas tank. | Source

First Remove the Air Filter

Remove the air filter from the housing and check it for dirt. Wash it in soap and hot water, then squeeze and allow to air-dry.

If you're just removing the air filter to clean it without doing any further maintenance or troubleshooting, it's always a good idea to close the choke beforehand to prevent any dirt from getting into the carburetor.

Filter Housing
Filter Housing | Source
Foam air filter.
Foam air filter. | Source
Ensure the filter is free of dirt. Wash if necessary.
Ensure the filter is free of dirt. Wash if necessary. | Source
The choke is simply a plate which covers the air intake. When it is closed, the engine sucks in a richer mixture (i.e a higher concentration of fuel in the air/fuel mixture). This makes for easier starting.
The choke is simply a plate which covers the air intake. When it is closed, the engine sucks in a richer mixture (i.e a higher concentration of fuel in the air/fuel mixture). This makes for easier starting. | Source

Remove the Air Filter Housing

Two nuts hold this housing in place.

Remove the retaining nuts with a socket wrench.
Remove the retaining nuts with a socket wrench. | Source
The carburetor exposed: Next, the fuel lines and throttle cable must be removed.
The carburetor exposed: Next, the fuel lines and throttle cable must be removed. | Source
Mark the fuel lines before removal. A "Tippex" style correction pen is useful for doing this.
Mark the fuel lines before removal. A "Tippex" style correction pen is useful for doing this. | Source
Don't stretch the fuel lines by pulling them. Instead, try pulling them gently while pushing with a flat bladed screwdriver or needle nose pliers against the edge of the lines.
Don't stretch the fuel lines by pulling them. Instead, try pulling them gently while pushing with a flat bladed screwdriver or needle nose pliers against the edge of the lines. | Source
Remove the end of the throttle cable.
Remove the end of the throttle cable. | Source
Carburetor ready for dismantling.
Carburetor ready for dismantling. | Source

CAUTION !!!

Never attempt to use a compressor blowgun to blow into any orifices/tubes before disassembling the carburetor. You may burst the diaphragm and gaskets!

Be Careful With a Blowgun

You can try cleaning surfaces/orifices with a blowgun, but never blow into any sealed compartments before disassembly to avoid rupturing the diaphragm/pump.

It's probably okay to blow over the outer surface of the assembled carburetor to remove grime, but keep the nozzle of the blowgun away from any openings.

Also remove any screen filters and loose parts first which could get blown away.

Wear safety glasses to protect your eyes from grime and small parts which could get blown up towards your face.

Carburetor Disassembly

The diaphragm and reed valve pieces are delicate so take care while handling.

It's also a good idea to take lots of photos at every stage of disassembly just like I did here, in case you forget how to put everything back together!

4 screws hold the carburetor together. Remove the primer bulb retaining plate.
4 screws hold the carburetor together. Remove the primer bulb retaining plate. | Source
Trimmers either have a primer button mounted on the carburetor or a remote primer.
Trimmers either have a primer button mounted on the carburetor or a remote primer.

Check the Primer Bulb for Holes

  • The primer on a two-stroke engine is used for sucking fuel up into the carburetor. Without the primer bulb, the starter cord would have to be pulled loads of times before the fuel lines and carburetor fill up.
  • Holes or splits can eventually form in the primer bulb. If this happens when the bulb is full, you'll probably notice it because gas will leak out. However, if it has been some time since the trimmer was used and the bulb has emptied out, any holes will likely prevent it sucking fuel up from the tank.
  • If the material of bulb has deteriorated, it's possible also that it won't seal properly against the body of the carburetor, resulting in an air leak. Again, this will prevent the bulb sucking up fuel.
  • A check or non return valve is part of the priming system (the red piece shown in the photos). This has two one-way sections. When you push the primer bulb, fuel flows from the bulb through the central one-way section to the carburetor (which, according to Wikipedia, is a duck bill valve). Fuel can't flow back because pressure squeezes the duck bill closed. Dirt in this valve can keep it open, allowing fuel to flow back to the primer bulb, so the carburetor doesn't get properly primed.
  • The outer section is known as an umbrella valve and the floppy outer edges prevent fuel flowing backwards. When you release the bulb, suction causes the flexible edges of the valve to rise and fuel enters the bulb. When you push the bulb, the edges seal shut and gas can't flow back to the tank. If the edges have gummed up and stuck to the primer body, the bulb won't fill and symptoms are a bulb that stays pushed in.

Primer bulb and one way "umbrella" check valve (red piece in center). Check the edges of the valve aren't stuck to the primer body.
Primer bulb and one way "umbrella" check valve (red piece in center). Check the edges of the valve aren't stuck to the primer body. | Source
One-way or check valve. Check there's no dirt stuck in the "duck bill" valve section in the center.
One-way or check valve. Check there's no dirt stuck in the "duck bill" valve section in the center. | Source

Fuel Flow Through Carburetor

With all the holes and passageways in the carburetor, this can be somewhat confusing to work out. Have a look at the photo below. This is the sequence:

  1. Fuel leaves the tank via the fuel line (the one with the filter) and enters the carburetor, flowing up through the screen filter at point 1.
  2. Fuel flows down passageway at point 2.
  3. Fuel flows back up at point 3. The reed valve prevents fuel flowing back.
  4. Fuel flows down at point 4 and into the compartment 5. Here it is pushed by the "pump" (which is just a flexible section of the gasket) to point 6. Another reed valve prevents it flowing back when the pump is sucking fuel from the tank.
  5. Fuel fuel flows into the reservoir pocket (on the underside of this half of the carburetor) via the valve at point 7. The needle valve in this brass piece is operated by the diaphragm (see explanation of diaphragm below).
  6. Finally fuel leaves the reservoir pocket via the cross shaped piece in the center, and sprays into the carburetor venturi through the jet (in the other half of the carburetor).

Reed valves and fuel pump. The red numbers are the sequence of ports through which the fuel passes, flowing up through the screen at 1, and exiting down through the metering needle valve at 7 to the reservoir pocket.
Reed valves and fuel pump. The red numbers are the sequence of ports through which the fuel passes, flowing up through the screen at 1, and exiting down through the metering needle valve at 7 to the reservoir pocket. | Source

Fuel Pump

Fuel is pumped by suction from the crankcase acting on a membrane. The pulses of pressure move the membrane backwards and forwards, sucking fuel. Reed valves prevent fuel flowing backwards. Handle this piece with care as it can be easily damaged.

Note: In the photo, this appears to be one piece. However if you zoom in, you can see that there are in fact two parts stuck together. Firstly a gasket (which makes contact with the numbered part of the carb) and secondly a part which has the valves and pump. When reassembling, it's important to replace these in the correct order to prevent leaks.

Carburetor Kits

If you have a trimmer made by a well-known manufacturer, the chances are that you will be able to buy a carburetor rebuild kit. This is a collection of parts which can be used to replace components in a carburetor which have become torn, worn out, warped, punctured, coated with hard deposits, or deteriorated in any other way to the extent that cleaning won't help. It usually comprises of gaskets, reed valve/pump piece, diaphragm, needle valve, springs, primer bulb, etc.

The other half of the carburetor. Part of the jet assembly is in the center.
The other half of the carburetor. Part of the jet assembly is in the center. | Source

How a Diaphragm Works on a Two-Stroke Engine Carburetor

  • Lawn mowers and other similar engines often have a float bowl and float. This acts in a similar way to a toilet cistern and ball cock valve, ensuring there is always a full reservoir of fuel at a constant level from which the jet is supplied with fuel. This is important for the speed behavior of the engine
  • Unfortunately, a float bowl and float rely on gravity for correct operation and this system can't be used on a trimmer which is used in all orientations
  • Instead, a reservoir compartment is built into the carburetor. As this empties when the engine is running on full throttle external atmospheric pressure acting on the back of the diaphragm pushes the centre of it inwards. This forces a metering lever/rocker arm to pivot, lifting the metering needle/needle valve up out of its seat, allowing fuel to be pumped into the reservoir pocket
  • When the engine returns to an idling state there's less demand for fuel, so the reservoir starts to fill pushing the diaphragm out. The centre of the diaphragm no longer pushes down on the lever and the needle valve starts to close, preventing further fuel from being pumped in. So the reservoir is always kept filled with fuel
  • Just like the reed valve piece, the diaphragm is delicate and needs to be separated carefully from the body of the carburetor, especially if it has become stuck
  • Over time, the diaphragm can become punctured or get stretched and "baggy" in which case the needle valve can stay shut, even when the reservoir pocket is empty. The material can also stiffen, preventing proper operation

A Short Video Explaining How a Two Stroke Diaphragm Works

The diaphragm. As fuel is used, atmospheric pressure pushes down on the diaphragm, pivoting a rocker arm, lifting a needle valve and allowing more fuel to enter the pocket.
The diaphragm. As fuel is used, atmospheric pressure pushes down on the diaphragm, pivoting a rocker arm, lifting a needle valve and allowing more fuel to enter the pocket. | Source
Check for holes by holding up against a bright light source. Warping of these delicate parts can also prevent them working properly.
Check for holes by holding up against a bright light source. Warping of these delicate parts can also prevent them working properly. | Source
The diaphragm assembly consists of a needle valve, metering lever/rocker arm, and spring.
The diaphragm assembly consists of a needle valve, metering lever/rocker arm, and spring. | Source
Remove the retaining screw.
Remove the retaining screw. | Source
The needle valve seat. Clean this with carburetor cleaner.
The needle valve seat. Clean this with carburetor cleaner. | Source
Needle, metering lever, and spring.
Needle, metering lever, and spring. | Source

Clean All Surfaces

Clean all surfaces and fuel passageways with a carburetor cleaning aerosol. This removes any gum deposits which can clog pathways and jets.

If you have a compressed air blow gun, you can use it to aid drying. Set parts aside to dry once cleaned. Plastic parts, especially the reed valve piece and diaphragm, should be dried immediately after cleaning as the solvents in carburetor cleaner can be harsh and dissolve the plastic. Using IPA to clean these parts and the metering needle might be a safer option to avoid damage.

Avoid bending the reed valves with the force of the jet by spraying gently or resting the piece on a flat surface.

If you find your trimmer leaks fuel when not in use, the problem can be caused by a damaged tip on the metering needle or an accumulation of gum. This can be removed with a cotton bud soaked in isopropyl alcohol (IPA).

Clean the fuel pathways with carb cleaner. Make sure the outlets are pointed away from your eyes.
Clean the fuel pathways with carb cleaner. Make sure the outlets are pointed away from your eyes. | Source
Clean all surfaces of the carburetor with carb cleaner.
Clean all surfaces of the carburetor with carb cleaner. | Source
Clean the jet. An air blow gun is invaluable for clearing a complete blockage in the the jet if you don't have any carb cleaner.
Clean the jet. An air blow gun is invaluable for clearing a complete blockage in the the jet if you don't have any carb cleaner. | Source

Re-Assembling the Carburetor and How to Reconnect Fuel Lines

Once everything has dried, re-assemble the carburetor.

  1. Sandwich the gaskets and diaphragm between the various sections of the carburetor, replace all screws and only barely tighten.
  2. Next, tighten the screws fully in a staggered sequence. Usually there's 4 screws, so lightly tighten diagonally opposite screws first, then the other pair of diagonally opposite screws, then fully tighten. Don't over-tighten because a carburetor is soft aluminum and it's easy to strip threads.
  3. If you forgot to mark the fuel lines, you can check whether you mixed them up by filling the tank so that only the line with the filter is submerged or pulling the line without the filter up out of the gas in the tank. What should happen when you press the primer bulb is that gas is sucked through the line with the filter on the end, through the carburetor and flows back to the tank via the other line without the filter. If the lines are mixed up, air gets sucked up into the carburetor and you will see this bubbling out through the filter.

Fuel lines in tank, the intake line has a filter.
Fuel lines in tank, the intake line has a filter. | Source

Blocked Spark Arrestor Screen in the Muffler (Silencer)

The muffler exhaust is fitted with a wire spark arrestor screen (so you don't set fire to your garden or start a bush fire!). Over time, this collects smuts and can get clogged, reducing power output of the machine. Low smoke two-stroke oil supposedly slows build up of carbon. If you add too much two-stroke oil to your gas, however, the engine will smoke and deposits of soot will accumulate more rapidly.

I have checked this screen on my trimmer every couple of years and have never seen any deposits worth talking about. In any case, you can clean the carbon deposits with an old toothbrush, compressed air, or a small wire brush.

Remove the cowling.
Remove the cowling. | Source
Remove the cover over the exhaust outlet.
Remove the cover over the exhaust outlet. | Source
Spark arrestor screen.
Spark arrestor screen. | Source
Clean the screen with an old tooth brush, wire brush, or compressed air.
Clean the screen with an old tooth brush, wire brush, or compressed air. | Source

Adjusting the Idle Speed

If the engine keeps cutting out when idling, the idle speed may be too low.

  1. Allow the engine to run at top speed for about a minute, then release the trigger.
  2. Turn the idle speed screw clockwise about one eight of a turn and wait to see if the engine continues to run without cutting out.
  3. If it still cuts out, turn the screw another eight of a turn.
  4. Some trimmers and all hedge cutters have clutches which prevent the cutting head from operating when the engine is idling. If the blade starts moving or the trimmer line starts spinning, turn the screw slowly back counterclockwise until movement stops.

Adjusting the idle speed.
Adjusting the idle speed. | Source

What If a Trimmer Won't Stop

If the start/stop switch fails on your trimmer (or other engine), turn on the choke. This will flood the engine and stop it promptly.

Trimmer Cuts Out on Full Throttle

  • Check the vent in the cap/tank isn't blocked.
  • Ensure cracks in intake fuel line in tank aren't sucking in air, preventing fuel from getting to carburetor.
  • Make sure choke is off.
  • Are you using the correct mixture? Use 1:50 or 1:40 oil:gas. Too much oil can cause problems.
  • Clean air filter and exhaust screen.
  • Diaphragm/pump section in carburetor may have stiffened so it can't pump/meter fuel.

Did You Get Your Engine Started Using the Information in This Article?

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Questions & Answers

  • Do you have any possible causes for a dangerously strong recoil on the pull cord? The engine engages, whips the cord back and then the engine cuts.

    This can be caused by the engine misfiring at the wrong point in the sequence. So instead of the plug sparking and the mixture exploding as the mixture is compressed and the piston is about to change direction, ignition occurs prematurely, and the piston gets pushed back "the other way." So this turns the engine the wrong way and pulls the cord back.

    Misfiring can be caused by a loose or incorrectly adjusted magnet coil, or a flywheel in the wrong position on the crankshaft due to a damaged flywheel key. Also, poor fuel and air leaks between carburetor and engine can be an issue.

  • I have a 26cc Chinese hedge trimmer which refuses to start. All the usual checks I have carried out and still no joy. It has new fuel, new spark plug, new carb, and still not even a kick. There is plenty of spark, fuel and air. Is it possible that the spark timing has moved, and if so how does one check it?

    Yes, it is possible that the flywheel has moved on the shaft and affected timing. There may be a flywheel key which could have sheared allowing the flywheel to shift from the correct position. A spark should occur when the piston is near the top, dead center (TDC), so look into the spark plug hole and check whether the piston is near the top of the cylinder when the magneto coincides with the flywheel magnets. Another thing you should check is that the crankcase cover (if there is one) is sealing properly and the gasket is ok.

  • My toro weed wacker will only run with full choke. I just put a new carb on. Why is this?

    It sounds as if it's starved of fuel and if it were an old carb, I'd suggest the following:

    You might have:

    Clogged jet/passages.

    Clogged needle valve/seat

    Check that any gaskets between the carb and air filter and carb and intake manifold are ok. There are one or two small holes beside the intake manifold on two-stroke engines, connected to the crankcase. Suction from the crankcase is used to operate the fuel pump in the carb. Check the hole/holes aren't blocked by the new gasket if it's a non-genuine part.

    Check the fuel line in the tank to make sure there are no splits that could be letting air in and preventing its ability to suck up fuel.

  • What could be the problem with my weed eater as the trim line trimmer won’t start and it’s very hard to pull the pull string?

    Something could be causing the flywheel to jam, possibly a loose flywheel magneto. Remove the plug and see if it's easier to pull the starter cord. If it is, check the exhaust and air cleaner to make sure they're not clogged and restricting the flow of exhaust out and mixture flowing in. There may just be high compression on the engine (some engines have a compression release that reduces compression and makes it easier to pull start the engine).

  • Why is my priming bulb hard to press?

    If the valve is like the red one in the photo in the article, it could be because it's stuck, specifically the central "duck bill" part that allows fuel to pass into the reservoir pocket under the diaphragm. If it stays stuck in, it's the flappy edges that are stuck.

© 2014 Eugene Brennan

Do you have any questions or comments to add?

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    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      7 weeks ago from Ireland

      If you mean the recoil starter pulley, it may be jammed somehow by the cord, spring or ratchet pawls. Best thing to do is remove it from the trimmer and see if it is actually jammed or its the flywheel that is stuck.

    • profile image

      Gary abdul 

      7 weeks ago

      How to fix the pully which stuck if i want to start. Looks jammed. What can i do.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      2 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Paul,

      Sounds like a fuel flow problem. Enough fuel is getting to the engine for it to idle, but when the throttle is opened up, not enough sprays into the airway.

      Check the vent in the cap/tank isn't blocked.

      Ensure cracks in intake fuel line in tank aren't sucking in air, preventing fuel from getting to carburetor.

      Make sure choke is off.

      Are you using the correct mixture? Use 1:50 or 1:40 oil:gas. Too much oil can cause problems.

      Clean air filter and exhaust screen.

      Diaphragm/pump section in carburetor may have stiffened so it can't pump/meter fuel.

      The jet in the carburetor or metering needle/seat may be clogged.

    • profile image

      Paul 

      2 months ago

      Strimmer starts no problem but when I increase the revs it cuts out. any ideas

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      3 months ago from Ireland

      I don't know. We're always advised to use genuine parts when replacing. There's a possibility that gaskets may not match the fuel entry port on the manifold or the passageway to the crankcase used for operating the fuel pump in the carburetor. Also too much fuel could be metered into the engine because the carburetor is designed for a more powerful machine, so it could over speed.

      Often power equipment sold by homestores or tools distributors is made in China and just badged. So machines with different brands are the same and use the same parts.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      5 months ago from Ireland

      Hi John,

      Sounds as though the shaft is broken or the square end of the shaft is worn and the corners are rounded so it doesn't turn the head.

      Have a look at this video.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHFMSeg8Rwg

    • profile image

      John Harrod 

      5 months ago

      My Ryobi weed - eater engine starts and sounds fine but the spinner seems to be frozen and won't turn

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      Check your air filter is clean, also remove any carbon deposits from the muffler, use new fuel and make sure you have a spark

    • profile image

      Sheik 

      6 months ago

      How do you check if you're getting a weak suction in the carburetor .

      I think the air /gas is not been pulled in enough.

      Is there a leak somewhere?

      Brand new carburetor, gaskets and new air filter.....compression 120.

      Please help

      It's a craftsman blower

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Gabriel,

      I've never come across this problem, but the consensus seems to be that an air leak can cause the problem (or cracks in the fuel lines, but you've replaced those).

      Have a look at this discussion:

      https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/sti...

    • profile image

      gabriel 

      6 months ago

      I have a Craftsman 32cc 2stroke. I had to change fuel lines and clean out the carb. Now after Getting it to start It revs up high and shuts off. Then it wont start back up for a few minutes. I was told this can be a symptom of a bad gasket/ air leak from the carb to the motor? What do you think?

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      You're welcome Tom, Let me know how you get on and it'll contribute to the knowledge base. You could also try getting a carb kit as an alternative to a new carb.

    • profile image

      Tom Stenger 

      6 months ago from Delaware, Ohio

      Thanks for your help Eugene :^). I'll take it apart (carefully) and check those things out. Ma opt to purchase a new carb if needed.

      Much appreciated!

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      Temperature can drop substantially as gas expands, hence the vapour trails on the wings of aircraft in low pressure regions of the wing, or you'll notice how an aerosol can gets really cold as spray is released. Another example is when you blow out air from your mouth onto you hand. If your mouth is wide open it feels warm, but if you blow out with your lips tightly closed, the air feels cold, because the temperature drops as it expands on exit. Moisture will also condense when air is compressed because it can only hold a certain mass of water per volume at a specific temperature. So this is why water condenses in the tank of an air compressor, as molecules of H2O get squashed together when the air is compressed.

    • profile image

      Grullafo 

      6 months ago

      Yes. I did notice that the water seemed to condense as it hit the surrounding air. Lots of little droplets that then coagulated into a stream of drips. The outside temperature was in the high 20s, but the humidity was extremely high, enough to trigger hundreds of thunderstorms over England and Wales. I've never seen a 2-stroke do that before!

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      It's unlikely to be water because the heat of the exhaust would instantly evaporate it. A by-product of combustion is water vapour, but you normally only see this on frosty days from e.g. a vehicle exhaust or condenser boiler.

      You may get black/brown tarry creosote coming from the exhaust but this is normally a smelly sticky substance. I would have thought excess fuel would combust, so on second thoughts maybe as the exhaust gasses expand, the temperature drops to a degree that water vapour condenses out in the humid atmosphere.

    • profile image

      Grullafo 

      6 months ago

      I have an old Mitox 2-stroke strimmer. I used it yesterday to cut down long grass using the thickest nylon cord that I could find. The engine was worked hard, and after a few minutes I noticed large quantities of fluid coming from it. At first I thought that the petrol tank had split, but on further investigation it turned out to be dirty water coming from the exhaust. The weather was very warm and humid. Is this normal?

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Tom,

      possible causes are a stiff diaphragm that pushes downwards and keeps the needle open, a needle stuck open or not sealing, or a choke plate not opening properly.

    • profile image

      Tom Stenger 

      6 months ago from Delaware, Ohio

      Hi Don,

      Thanks for your tutorial and all the info on 2 Cycles. It helped me walk through possible issues with my Stihl MM55. It's run fine the past4 or so years we had it. We're in Ohio and I cleaned the gas and everything out , successfully starting it before loaning to my friend for the day, who ran it successully.

      I then tried less than a week after to start it...wouldnt start so I emptied the mixture out and replaced with mine (Still specs).

      When I crank it, it's spitting gas mixture out of the carb in rhythm with my starter-pullks. The first couple times I tried starting, it had tried to start, then this. Not blaming my friend at all, but is it a broken diaphragm, broken piston? I can probably pick up a matching carb at our Ace /Stihl dealer up the road.

      Any ideas suggestion much appreciated!

      Tom

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      I haven't been able to find that kit Don, the cheapest carburetor is $21.27 here:

      https://www.partstree.com/parts/mtd/parts/753-0851...

      I've posted on a forum and asked if anyone knows whether it can be sourced.

    • profile image

      Don 

      6 months ago

      Thanks for the quick response. The blower model is a craftsman 41BS2BVG799 27CC engine. I can find a replacement for the entire carb which is model MTD 753-08517. But why replace the carb if the only issue is the diaphragm.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Don,

      Do you have a model number for the blower?

      It's not recommended to use non genuine parts, but a lot of the time, origianal parts aren't available. You could try and see if they work. A part may feed too much fuel into the engine and since thes small engines don't have a governor, it could possibly over rev.

    • profile image

      Don 

      6 months ago

      I have a Craftsman Blower and it looks like the diaphragm needs to be replaced. I can not find a rebuild kit for the model number of the blower. I do see other kits where the diaphragm looks the same but they do not list my blower as a compatible model and some of the kits that look like they will work are for chainsaws or trimmers. Could I use a kit that the diaphragm looks the same or are there really differences between diaphragms?

    • profile image

      Arwel Richards 

      6 months ago

      Great article - many thanks

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      If the strimmer has a clutch, it may be broken or the clutch shoes worn. Otherwise there's some problem down along line where the engine couples to the flexible drive shaft and head, again due to wear or something snapped.

    • profile image

      andrew 

      6 months ago

      strimmer is working ( motor) but not the strimmer head not turning

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      6 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Calvin,

      If the strimmer is new, I would advise contacting the retailer/manufacturer as you'll probably invalidate warranty if you start meddling with it.

      Difficulty in pull starting can be due to a partially blocked exhaust due to combustion residues or possibly reed valves not opening properly.

    • profile image

      Calvin 

      6 months ago

      Hi, I'm also having the same problem but with a new strimmer (Hyundai HYBC5200). Worked for 30 minutes then I couldn't start it again, too much resistance from the pull cord. When the spark plug was removed the resistance was gone. Plug was dry, checked gap which was fine and replaced spark plug anyway but as soon as it's in the cord won't pull?

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      7 months ago from Ireland

      It depends on the trimmer. As you can see in the photos above, the check valve under the primer bulb is exposed by undoing a plate held on by four screws. You should then be able to grip the flappy edges of the valve and pull it out gently at an angle. The check valve in the tank or tank cap differs a lot between each models so I can't help you with that.

    • profile image

      Steve 

      7 months ago

      How do I remove the check valve

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      7 months ago from Ireland

      Hi John,

      When you say won't pull do you mean not start or there's resistance to the cord being pulled? If there's a decompression valve it could be faulty and staying shut when you try to open it. This engine also has reed valves on lead air intake ports so maybe these are staying closed. Does the recoil starter turn really freely when the plug is removed?

    • profile image

      John Blevins 

      7 months ago

      I'm trying to figure out why my trimmer won't pull? I had replaced primer bulb and now it won't hardly pull at all unless I take spark plug out then it pulls and recoil just fine. My trimmer is a redmax gz25n please help

    • profile image

      Chad 

      7 months ago

      This is a very thorough post! Very nice explaining the pathway of the gas in the carb too.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      7 months ago from Ireland

      Not the version I have. It's designed to supply the correct percentage of fuel in the mixture that feeds the engine.

    • Peter Heaslip profile image

      Peter 

      7 months ago from Australia

      Thanks eugine,do you know if they can be adjusted or there just set as is.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      7 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Peter, there's no adjustment on mine except for a screw that sets the idling speed of the engine.

    • profile image

      peter 

      7 months ago

      Hi eugine,i have the same carby as the one your showing,(we call the chinese throw aways) as they dont have hi/lo adjustment screws,can they be adjusted or are they really throw aways,thanks peter.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      8 months ago from Ireland

      Check it's priming ok by putting a small amount of petrol into the tank. Then push the primer button and make sure fuel returns to the tank via the line without the filter. Dismantling the carburetor is a fiddly business. So maybe check the seal on the crankcase is ok first, because the crankcase needs to hold vapor before the back of the piston forces it up into the cylinder. On my strimmer, the crankcase cover is held on by 4 screws (see photo, bottom right where I'm removing the cover over the exhaust screen) and the seal is a rubber gasket that runs all around the perimeter. You could check if that's ok, but if it's difficult to remove the screws, don't force them.

    • profile image

      Henry Lobb 

      8 months ago

      Hi Eugene

      It wasn’t a screeching noise or anything that sounded like rubbing...more like an over-revving noise if anything. When I say over-revving, I mean more revs than usual when idling, rather than beyond the normal level at full throttle. The engine turns OK when I pull the cord: there doesn’t seem to be any resistance. It just doesn’t fire into action.

      Best

      Henry

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      8 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Henry,

      That sounds odd? Was it a screeching noise as though something was rubbing? The flywheel could be rubbing the magneto coil if it was loose, or something else along the drive shaft. Does the engine turn ok without any resistance when the cord is pulled? It could also be something potentially fatal like a seized crankshaft connecting rod "bearing".

    • profile image

      Henry Lobb 

      8 months ago

      Hi Eugene, thanks for the excellent article. Before I go taking things apart that I might not be able to get back together I was wondering if you might give me a likely diagnosis of my strimmer's problem when I say that the engine note went quite high as I was using it and then it lost power and cut out. Since then I've not been able to start it...the engine did "kick" a few times initially as I attempted to start it, but since then it's been totally unresponsive. Air filter and fuel lines look fine...I don't (yet) have a spark wrench so I've not been able to test the spark plug. Any thoughts much appreciated!

    • profile image

      Martin 

      8 months ago

      Excellent explanatory article. Came in very handy to understand my brushcutter and fixed it afterwards.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      10 months ago from Ireland

      Check the fuel lines to make sure they aren't punctured. Check the primer sucks up fuel and returns it to the tank when pressed. If that doesn't work, you'll have to open it up an see if there are any blockages or whether anything has gummed up.

    • profile image

      Jakw 

      10 months ago

      I have a small mini Mac 120 chainsaw engine that has a carberator that will not suck fuel. I changed all the gaskets in it and the bulb seems to be good. There seems to be good compression when I pour a little gas into the cylinder. Anyone know what’s going on?

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      10 months ago from Ireland

      It could be a problem with the ignition module/circuitry. Sometimes if these are faulty and they get hot, expansion causes a connection to go open circuit. The problem rectifies on cooling.

    • profile image

      Ian 

      10 months ago

      Eugene thank you for the advice. The problem is when it cuts out, it takes awhile before I can start it again.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      10 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Ian,

      Usually this is an issue with fuel flow, but read the section on starting an engine properly above because often, starting a two stroke engine involves switching between full choke and half choke until the engine settles down. Also make sure you prime the engine about ten times before starting.

      If the engine starts to struggle before cutting out, turn the choke half on and see if it recovers and let it run for a while. If it starts to struggle again and splutters, this is likely because it is starting to flood and getting too much fuel so turn the choke back off again.

      Fuel flow issues can be caused by a faulty check valve (in the tank cap or tank body). If the valve is in the cap, loosen it a little and see if the engine will stay running.

    • profile image

      Ian 

      10 months ago

      Hi , my trimmer runs for a short time then cuts out. Restart and it runs for about 30sec and cuts out. Why?

      Please help.

      Ian

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      11 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Rajen,

      If the plug is burning, the engine must be running too hot. A mixture that is "lean", i.e. with too low a percentage of fuel in the fuel/air mix could cause this. On a lawn mower engine sometimes this causes the engine to spit and backfire. If there's a high speed mixture screw, you could open it up a bit, maybe 1/8 of a turn (noting how much you adjust to get back to square one in the future) and see if it improves matters over time.

    • profile image

      Rajen Govender 

      11 months ago

      Hi Eugene, thanks for the info. I have a 3 year old Riyobi brushcutter and this seems to be burning the spark plug. I have replaced 3 plugs within 2 months, cleaned the air filter and carb, but have not replaced kit in the carb. Would appreciate any advice

    • profile image

      Terry Howard 

      11 months ago

      thanks Eugene for the suggestions. With the old carby the symptoms were the same. The new carby looks exactly the same except for the mixture adjustment screw. As to the head for gravity feed I had the tank about metre higher than the engine. Will try the old carby again and replace the fuel line in case it is cracked or getting pinched as it passes through the grommet in the tank.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      11 months ago from Ireland

      Mysterious and mysteriouser! I wonder does gravity feed work with these types of carburetors? The pressure head you produce by rising the tank above the trimmer would would have to be sufficient to overcome the force of the metering spring pushing the needle into the seat.

      Do you think it would be worth replacing the old carby and doing all the tests again? Just in case the new one is a dud or it isn't totally compatible.

      Were the symptoms the same with the old carby?

      Are you absolutely sure there are no cracks in the intake fuel line in the tank? If you can, remove it and check it out.

    • profile image

      Terry Howard 

      11 months ago

      H I Eugene and thanks for the comments. Yes there is a mixture control on the new carby but not on the old one. I have tried adjusting the mixture from fully closed and then progressively by one full turn each time but no change to outcome. I cant understand why the engine runs on full choke, they usually only give a kick and you go to half choke for cold start and then fully open once engine warmed up. So I cant get by the thought that there must be an air leak that gives a burnable mixture with the choke closed but causes the mixture to go too lean once the choke or throttle is opened. I will try connecting a vacuum cleaner to the carby input side without an air filter to see if a partial vacuum is produced. At this time I cant think of anything else to do, very frustrating.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      11 months ago from Ireland

      Are there any mixture controls on the carby Terry and have you tried adjusting them?

    • profile image

      Terry Howard 

      11 months ago

      In your article you show how a diaphragm within the carby responds to fluctuations of pressure/vacuum and acts as a pump for the fuel supply to the carby. On my carby there is a small hole below the main throat and this aligns with a hole in the inlet manifold which goes into the crankcase. It is this hole that I believe is used to activate the pump in the carby. I have checked that there is no blockage and as I said I even tried a gravity feed to try and circumvent any problem with the pump despite it being a new carby but no change to the outcome.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      11 months ago from Ireland

      How does fuel enter the crankcase? If there's a valve maybe it could be obstructed?

    • profile image

      Terry Howard 

      11 months ago

      Thanks Eugene for the reply. Today I have confirmed that the small hole that goes from the crankcase to the carby pump is clear. Have tried running with a gravity feed using a new piece of fuel line from another tank direct to the carby fuel intake to assist the carby fuel pump but no change, starts on full choke and runs but as soon as you open the choke or throttle the engine stops. Currently running with out an air filter, using same fuel is being used on my blower and wiper snipper and has been used in the past.

      Spark plug is clean and there is no miss during running. If I gradually open the choke the engine begins to slow immediately until it stops, so to me it is definitely a air/fuel problem.

      Have also removed the hedge attachment so there is no load on the unit. all very frustrating as I do not know if is getting too much air or not enough fuel when I open the choke etc. any suggestions for other tests?

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      11 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Terry,

      Sounds as if you have covered covered most troubleshooting steps. I assume you cleaned the air filter. If not, wash it in detergent and squeeze dry before replacing.

      Are you certain you added the right amount of oil to the petrol? Too much oil could cause issues.

      Try a different spark plug also.

      Check the intake fuel line doesn't have any cracks that could cause it to suck in air.

      Are the blade screws overly tight? If they are, they could bind and stall the engine when you attempt to rev and the clutch engages.

    • profile image

      Terry Howard 

      11 months ago

      Great article and confirmed all the steps I had taken to try and resolve a problem with a 2 stroke hedge trimmer that will only start with full choke but stops as soon as choke or throttle is partially opened. Have replaced carby with a new one and checked for leaks in crankcase and replaced all gaskets, have checked crankshaft seals for leaks or damage. Have replaced fuel filter and tried running with fuel tank cap loose to allow it to breath. Have run out of ideas as to what to check next. unit is only 18 months old and has run well in the recent past but something changed and I cant figure out what it is! hope you can help.

    • profile image

      Aaron 

      12 months ago

      Excellent article

      Saved me a heap of time

      Cheers

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      13 months ago from Ireland

      Unfortunately not André, unless you use the Chrome browser to translate.

      Which bit do you not understand? It's a long time since I learned French, but maybe I could explain.

    • profile image

      André dupuis 

      13 months ago

      Can we get informations in french trou le with dôme informations dont understand

      Tanks andre

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      15 months ago from Ireland

      Thanks A,

      I don't know what browser you're using, but in Firexox you can print the central text and photos without the adds and related stuff on the left. Pagination probably isn't the best though and some modules straddle pages.

    • profile image

      A Kearney 

      15 months ago

      A PRINT button (for article only) would be helpful, & appreciated.

      Best article that I have come across - many thanks!

      Will attempt some of your suggestions, prior to throwing my damn trimmer out in the garbage.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      15 months ago from Ireland

      The model is SKU 325821

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      15 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Seamus,

      I assume you've tried a new plug and there's still no spark? Check also that the spark lead hasn't pulled out a bit from the rubber booth. Sometimes this isn't a moulded piece, the inner core of the spark lead just pushes onto the sharp end of the spring in the booth (that pushes onto the plug).

      I've sent Woodies A DM to see whether they can provide any details. I remember doing this before, but they couldn't help, but I'll let you know if they get back to me. In the meantime, I suggest you search for "strimmer ignition module" or "trimmer ignition module" on eBay and see if you can find something similar. These modules are likely made by the thousand in China and then fitted to unbranded strimmers which then get badged. Check also for any id no. on the module and search for that online.

    • profile image

      Seamus 

      15 months ago

      Hi Eugene,

      I have the same Pro-Cut strimmer as shown in your article. I have no spark, even with the kill switch disconnected. I have narrowed it down to the ignition module. I cannot get a spare part as Woodies import them from China without parts support and exchange the whole unit when they get a faulty one. Do you know of a supplier for spares? I get the feeling they are very like the Ryobi range. Is there an equivalent part?

    • profile image

      Tom 

      15 months ago

      Excellent article on 2 stroke small engines.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      15 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Bev,

      Some things you can try:

      Check the choke is off, clean the air filter, and if you can remove the holding screws (don't force them if they are burned on), remove and clean the exhaust screen. Next make sure your two stroke mix is correct. So use 20ml of oil/litre in the petrol/gas (2.6 US fluid ounces per US gallon). Check the throttle trigger and cable is turning the appropriate parts at the carburetor. If none of this works, you may have to dismantle the carburetor and clean it and the jet, or possibly replace the diaphragm/gasket using a kit of replacement parts.

      Hope this helps!

    • profile image

      Bev 

      16 months ago

      When the the engine is on and it's revin theres not enough power getting to the bit to cut the grass what could it be plz

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      16 months ago from Ireland

      Thanks Kenneth! Glad you found it helpful!

    • profile image

      kenneth 

      16 months ago

      This was one of the best written DIY articles I have ever read. Very helpful and clear explanations and pics. Thank you!

    • profile image

      Kelly 

      16 months ago

      Brilliant and very detailed. And yes a girl finding this useful.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      16 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Pharmon,

      That sounds strange. Are there definitely no blockages in the muffler or exhaust port? It could just be a coincidence that the trimmer refused to start after replacing the muffler and the engine might have flooded. You could try removing the muffler again and confirming it's causing a problem, but there is always a fire hazard with it removed.

    • profile image

      Pharmon 

      16 months ago

      Hello Eugene - I'm trying to resurrect my father-in-law's old McColluch 3227 trimmer after a decade of disuse. I cleaned out the carb and hoses and added a new spark plug but it wouldn't start. After I removed the muffler it started right up and seems to run fine. When I reattach the muffler it again won't start. I don't see any major deposits in the muffler, the airways appear open and the spark screen is cleaned. Any ideas why this could be occuring? Thanks.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      16 months ago from Ireland

      Alan and Montego, It sounds as though both of you have a fuel feed problem. I suggest if you feel confident about it, that you check the diaphragm and gaskets in the carburetor to make sure none of the reed valves are stuck and that the metering needle is ok and opening properly. If the trimmers have a high speed adjustment screw, this could be clogged also. Have a look at this video:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTlO5WN4RVM

      Two points on the video Firstly the guy doesn't dry any parts after using the cleaner. I've seen it recommended elsewhere that parts are dried off before re-assembly using an air compressor blow gun or tissue because cleaner can be harsh and damage some plastic parts if it's left on it too long. Also he tightens the screw adjustments after assembly, intending to readjust them afterwards. I would suggest that before you disassemble, you tighten the screws gently until they reach the end of their travel while counting the turns (including fractions of turns). Then you'll know how to get them back to where they were after cleaning.

    • profile image

      Montego 

      16 months ago

      My trimmer is getting fuel to the plug, fire to the plug and the on off switch is working but it won't crank. New fuel filter, fuel lines all connected properly, new plug. I'm using premix fresh gas. Its only two years old and I use it about 10 minutes per week, still looks like new. Primer bulb also working correctly and returning gas to the tank no bubbles. Its a Tanaka trimmer. Any help?

    • profile image

      Alan 

      16 months ago

      My strimmer engine will idle but wont rev on the throttle - when I press the primer bulb it will reve enough to turn the strimmer lines at low speed in short bursts until you press it again. Is it a fuel feed / blockage issue or a compression issue ? Any advice appreciated Thanks

    • profile image

      Aivars Loginovs 

      16 months ago

      Just reading the instructions you offer tells me I'm in the right place. I have just enough knowledge to be dangerous and not enough to troubleshoot logically w/o missing important steps. Thank you for helping the little guy. Must not make the big engine repair outfits happy. Now they can't so readily pick our pockets. Thank You

    • profile image

      gwk 

      17 months ago

      Done all that. I'm a motor tech and have gone through all the usual. Full gaskets New fuel lines and return. New primer and ducksbill valve. On priming there is ever only a half full primer bubble. On priming Air is being pumped back to tank. No Air in uptake line. Air is getting into circuit somewhere. I'm flumoxed . Any ideas? Thanks for your prompt reply.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      17 months ago from Ireland

      When you prime, fuel should return to tank. Sounds as though air is somehow getting into primer bulb area and then being pushed back out return line. When you push bulb, it should feel spongy. Check also for any cracks in fuel lines which could be letting in air. Fuel filter should fall down properly into fuel. If it's tangling on something and not dropping, air will get sucked in.

      Check all your gaskets are seated properly and tighten screws in a staggered sequence.

    • profile image

      gwk 

      17 months ago

      Hi. working on April's strummed. Initially suffered from fuel starvation. Replaced tank vent. No go. Overhauled carb gasket set. No go. Replaced duckbill valve. No go. On priming fuel I have pure petrol in line but loads of air in return line. Lines are new and not reversed. Air is being drawn in, but where. Any idea?

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      18 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Mark,

      In answer to your questions:

      1) Until now I have only tried to clean the carburetor. The first time, I assumed that was the only option I had. Then I identified the carburetor and now know that gasket and rebuild kits are available for it. I was much more careful during the second cleaning and did a better job, particularly with the strainer. (I thought it might be my problem). I thought all parts looked reusable, no visible damage. The only area that wasn't cleaned directly is below the Welch plug. Could that be the achilles heel in my process?

      A1) The idea of Welch plugs is to cover up "junctions" between machined ports (the passageways can't be totally cast). As far as I know Welch plugs need to be replaced after removal, but you may get replacements with a carburetor kit. If you have an air compressor, you could try blowing through a port with an air gun and confirm air exits through the other port (don't blow into a sealed part such as the diaphragm reservoir/pocket without disassembly because it could cause damage). This would indicate the port is clear.

      2) I haven't replaced the fuel cap. If the carburetor now has no priming issues, shouldn't that verify that the fuel cap is working properly?

      A2)It should do because if air isn't being vented into the tank as fuel leaves, priming would probably fail. The primer bulb should fill with fuel if it's working ok, and fuel should return to the tank via the line with no filter.

      3) Does adding fuel at the spark plug hole effectively bypass the carburetor? If so, and the engine still doesn't start, what does that mean?

      A3) The idea of putting fuel into the cylinder is to bypass the carburetor and hopefully some of it will evaporate and explode, warm the cylinder and aid starting. However it can also flood the engine.

      4) What should my next step be? I am at a loss as to where to begin.

      A4)

      You can put some light oil on recoil starter springs, but don't oil rope/pulleys. If the starter pulley is nylon, it already has a low coefficient of friction (it's a slippy plastic) and doesn't need to be oiled.

      This is a guide for replacing the pull cord on a trimmer:

      https://dengarden.com/home-improvement/Stihl-KM-56...

      Hopfully the plug is the correct length and isn't hitting the piston? In any case when you replace the plug, it will be more difficult to pull the starter cord because of the resistance as the mixture is compressed in the cylinder.

      If you've looked at the animation on the "Animated Engines" website (See link at the top of this page), you probably will have discovered how the crankcase is used to store mixture before it gets passed to the cylinder. On my trimmer 4 screws hold on the crankcase and it's fairly well sealed. I had a Homelite chainsaw and the gasket was pretty crappy, so that's something to checkout.

      You could try removing the spark lead, take off the air filter and put your palm over the intake manifold while pulling the starter cord. If fuel is getting through the jet, this should flood the carburetor. If there's no sign of fuel, there's something seriously wrong with the pumping mechanism or meter needle. Don't try starting this way because there's a potential fire risk if the engire backfires.

      Make sure you're starting the engine properly. So prime, pull start with choke on until engine runs or pops, then turn choke off after a few seconds and allow to run, or if not running pull with choke off. Two stroke engines are easy to flood and you may have to leave the engine for 15 mins or so until fuel evaporates. (removing plug make this happen quicker)

    • profile image

      Mark Harrison 

      18 months ago

      Hi Eugene,

      Struggling to get my Homelite Trim N' Edge String Trimmer, Model UT-20702, working again. Looks similar to your model with red housing. Here's my process so far:

      Phase 1: When I decided to take a look at it, the gas lines dissolved at the wall of the fuel tank. I replaced them and the fuel filter as it was integral to the replacement lines in the Ryobi kit I bought. I might have compromised something by removing the tank when replacing the lines, but was careful to reassemble cleanly. Found the Primer bulb was leaking from a split around the top and replaced it as well. Also cleaned the air filter. After reassembled, carburetor primed, but the engine would not start.

      Phase 2: Cleaned the carburetor as per your instructions. Didn't do a good job as now the primer would not pull gas from the fuel tank.

      Phase 3: Cleaned the carburetor a second time. Between the cleanings, was able to determine that the carburetor is a Zama C1U-H39A. After this cleaning, the starting problems continue.

      Phase 4: Confirmed that I had spark at the spark plug, also cleaned it and checked the gap, which was correct. Then replaced the plug with a new one and still no start. Tried adding gas to spark plug hole and still no start.

      Observation: The string pull is difficult and noisy. Noticed that the pull is smooth with the spark plug removed. Attempted this several times and got puffs of smoke through the spark plug hole. Once the plug was reinstalled, pulling the string becomes difficult again.

      Phase 5: Took a look at the spring and pull. Think I've lost some of the spring tension during this process and need to retighten. Was wondering about lubrication for this as there appeared to be none present. Can you tell me how to reinstall the spring at full tension? Not real obvious to me.

      Questions: 1) Until now I have only tried to clean the carburetor. The first time, I assumed that was the only option I had. Then I identified the carburetor and now know that gasket and rebuild kits are available for it. I was much more careful during the second cleaning and did a better job, particularly with the strainer. (I thought it might be my problem). I thought all parts looked reusable, no visible damage. The only area that wasn't cleaned directly is below the Welch plug. Could that be the achilles heel in my process?

      2) I haven't replaced the fuel cap. If the carburetor now has no priming issues, shouldn't that verify that the fuel cap is working properly?

      3) Does adding fuel at the spark plug hole effectively bypass the carburetor? If so, and the engine still doesn't start, what does that mean?

      4) What should my next step be? I am at a loss as to where to begin.

      Thank you very much for your informative articles.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      18 months ago from Ireland

      Hi,

      If you imagine the valve in an upright position like a real umbrella, fuel flow should come up from underneath the perimeter of the "umbrella", flow across the top and then back down through the central "handle". From that you should be able to work out the direction of flow.

      Check when you prime that fuel is actually getting up into the carburetor and returning to the tank. You can do this by keeping the line without the filter on the end above the fuel level. If that works, the problem is likely to be with the diaphragm or fuel pump.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      18 months ago from Ireland

      Question received via email:

      I have managed to clean and rebuild my unit but it fails to run for more than a few seconds when it does start.

      I notice that there are 2 flow paths in the housing that holds the "umbrella" / duck bill check valve that appear to have one way valves fitted.

      In what direction should the flow be in these paths as 1 of mine appears to be blocked.

      I can freely use an aerosol cleaner in all ports and paths except one in the "umbrella" housing.

      The electrics all appear fine, with a good spark at the plug.

      It also has good compression so must be fuel related trouble.

      Thanks for your help in advance.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      19 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Schlankae,

      The problem is likely a fuel delivery issue due to the carb not being able suck fuel when the choke is open. Here's a few things you can try:

      Replace the fuel filter if you haven't done so already when you changed the lines.

      Check the vent in the tank cap/tank isn't blocked.

      Check the metering needle isn't stuck and if it has a rubber tip, this isn't damaged. Make sure passageways in the carb aren't blocked.

      Examine the diaphragm to see whether it has any holes and make sure it isn't deformed. Either scenario would require a replacement. Replacement carb kits are inexpensive and widely available from Amazon/eBay.

    • profile image

      Schlankae 

      19 months ago

      Hi, I have a Ryobi trimmer that I hadn't used in *several* years. I finally decided to get it running again, and I've replaced the fuel lines and primer bulb. I actually managed to start it, but only with Choke on. Initially it ran fast/slow which seemed to even out the longer it ran. However it only runs with choke on. As soon as it turn off Choke to "Run", it cuts out. It restarts immediately with choke on and I can play with the choke lever, but the closer I get to Run (choke off) it cuts out. Any suggestions?

      Thx!

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      19 months ago from Ireland

      Hi Davy!

      I doubt whether he ran the strimmer on pure diesel. A 4 stroke engine (e.g. a lawn mower engine) will run on kerosene when warmed up, but the fuel doesn't burn fully when the engine idles and the result is clouds of smoke from the exhaust due to unburned fuel. It probably clogs up the engine with soot over time also and can cause damage due to "knocking". Petrol-paraffin tractors used to run on TVO after WWII which was paraffin with waste additives added back in to increase the octane rating. Other petrol engine tractors ran on kerosene with heaters to vaporise the fuel before it got sucked into the engine. Diesel is less volatile than kerosene but a better lubricant, so your friend's logic was probably to use it in lieu of two stroke oil, but maybe he was overenthusiastic and added too much?

      Petrol should flush everything out eventually, but first I would drain any remaining fuel out of the tank. Then keep pushing the primer bulb while checking the return line in the tank (the one without the filter) until no more fuel comes out. Then add mix with a 1:50 ratio as described above. If that doesn't work, follow the starting procedure I describe in the article. So prime about 10 times, start on choke until the engine kicks, pull again and if the engine runs, allow it to run until it cuts out and then start again with no choke. There's a bit more detail on starting above, so check that out.

      Hope that helps, but go through the troubleshooting steps and see if everything else checks out ok.

    • profile image

      Davy Collins 

      19 months ago

      Hi Eugene

      I was recently given a Strimmer from a friend as he had problems starting it so bought a multi tool version instead. He'd had it served before and working so really should not had a problem!? The curious thing was he said it ran on Red Diesel which I never heard of before. On checking online its a DynamAc DB-26 2 Stroke engine so how can I purge the engine and carb etc of the Red Diesel if that whats in the engine? Would explain why doesn't start? Thanks

    • profile image

      scott 

      19 months ago

      nice job.Thanks

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      20 months ago from Ireland

      Hi bps001,

      It sounds like a fuel starvation and feed problem. If you press the primer bulb and it improves matters temporarily, this seems to indicate that the carburetor isn't getting enough fuel. An engine may idle ok when the throttle is almost closed and a small amount of fuel is spraying into the airflow. However when the throttle opens up and lots of air rushes in, if the jet isn't supplying sufficient fuel, the fuel/air mix will be much too lean (weak) and the engine will stall.

      Firstly eliminate any simple problems. So check the choke is off, clean the air filter, and if you can remove the holding screws (don't force them if they are burned on), remove and clean the exhaust screen. Next make sure your two stroke mix is correct. So use 20ml of oil/litre in the petrol/gas (2.6 US fluid ounces per US gallon). Check the throttle trigger and cable is turning the appropriate parts at the carburetor. If none of this works, you may have to dismantle the carburetor and clean it and the jet, or possibly replace the diaphragm/gasket using a kit of replacement parts.

      Hope this helps!

    • profile image

      bps001 

      20 months ago

      Hi Great article.

      I have A Titan strimmer and it not working probably. It seems like there is not the right amount of fuel going into the engine. I can get it start but when I go to used the strimmer or any of the attachments it dose not seem to have the right amount of power to make it move correctly as when you use the strimmer attachment you can see it is not spinning right. But when you have it running and you press the prime bulb it seems to have more power and then it works like it should but only for a couple of seconds. How do you could fix this?

      Thanks

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      21 months ago from Ireland

      Good! Glad the guide was of use to you Donna. Happy Trimming or (or Strimming as we say here!)

    • profile image

      Donna 

      21 months ago

      You are brilliant, Eugene! I followed your exact instructions and it started right up. I am so glad I found your website. I was prepared to clean the carburetor and now I don't have to, thanks to you!!! I really appreciate you sharing your knowledge and for taking the time to respond to specific questions. Thanks again.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      21 months ago from Ireland

      Hi donna,

      It may have gummed up but what can happen sometimes is that fuel can slowly leak into the carburetor and then into the venturi or intake airway and flood everything. When fuel evaporates, lots of two stroke oil is left behind which would explain the smoke (usually blue or white).

      Try removing the air filter and if it is saturated with oil residue, wash it in soapy water and squeeze dry (only applicable to foam filters). Also try pull starting several times on no choke to clear any fuel which may have accumulated. Then start as normal using the procedure I have explained in the article. At the start of the season it can take a lot of choke on/choke off plus reprime attempts to get everything working again.

    • profile image

      Donna 

      21 months ago

      Thank you for such an informative article. I have an Echo PE-225 edger. I had not used it for about 8 months and when I tried to start it, it blew a lot of smoke. So, I drained the fuel and replaced it with fresh. Now it won't start at all. Do you think I gummed up the carburetor? If so, do you think I could clean it myself? I don't have a lot of experience with this sort of thing but am willing to give it a try. Thanks again.

    • profile image

      Denny M 

      21 months ago

      Great informative article!! Read every word and will use this information on my craftsman leaf blower. I baby this machine, but lately requires a shot of carb cleaner in air intake to get started and then runs perfectly. This with a new carb and filter. Anyway, great info. Thank you.

    • eugbug profile imageAUTHOR

      Eugene Brennan 

      2 years ago from Ireland

      Thanks Mike. Possibly I have a gasket also on top of the diaphragm on my trimmer, so I must check this out. The kits have 6 parts so do you mean the diaphragm and pump section are both sandwiched between a top and bottom gasket?

    • profile image

      Mike 

      2 years ago

      I'm sorry I ment to say that in my case I needed to put another gasket on top of the diaphragm and the pump/reed with the aluminum section in the middle

      Thanks again and I really appreciate an author who actually reads and responds to the comments. Often being the best part of reading blog posts on line

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