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10 Reasons Not to Plant the Sago Palm

Updated on October 2, 2017
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Sherry has maintained homes and landscaped yards for 45 years in Southern California. She has collected water-wise succulents for 10 years.

Ten-year-old sago palm.
Ten-year-old sago palm.
Note the pups over-growing at the bottom and at spots higher up. Take caution to not let them grow for too long.
Note the pups over-growing at the bottom and at spots higher up. Take caution to not let them grow for too long.

Sago Palm: Landscape Plant You May Want to Avoid

Although I'm writing to tell you how problematic the sago plant (Cycas revoluta) is, I also include instructions on how to trim and do yearly maintenance if you already have one.

There is not anything wispy or soft about this plant. It has a thick skin of armor. Massive crowns of stiff needle-clad spears grow out from the center of a trunk that sports more needles and tough debris. The other bane of this almost ironclad plant is those little pups sprouting at the base of its trunk—if ignored, dislodging them becomes a huge chore.

The sago palm is a cycad from southern Japan that tolerates climes with no prolonged freezes. Cycads are a species of plant that go back to the Jurassic Age. I can see why cycads have survived. There are several types on the market, but the sago palm is one is the most hardy and the only one I have seen in tree-like form.

Should I Plant a Sago Palm?

I think you'll regret it. We have three in our yard, so I have firsthand experience.

It takes about 8 years to mature to its full size. That gives you some time to get rid of it if you decide it's too much for you. If you wait and then want to remove a mature plant, you may need a crane.

Note: If you decide to plant one anyway, I suggest you don't buy one if you can get pups from a friend or neighbor. It is one of those friendship plants, it can be shared easily.

10 Reasons Not to Plant a Sago Palm

  1. If you tend to let gardening slide, don't plant this one, or you'll be sorry.
  2. Every 1 to 2 years, you must chop off the pups to avoid a tangled mess.
  3. Every year the plant piles on a new row of spines. (Sometimes this growth is called a "flush.") Old spears must be cut off every year.
  4. Think of it as a tree, not a flower bed plant. It will get bigger and bigger.
  5. Everything on this plant is needle sharp and dangerous.
  6. Its debris is too tough for the recycle bin. Our city will not take it for recycling.
  7. You must wear safety glasses and protective clothing for big trimming jobs.
  8. The female plant blooms over the entire crown and produces red seeds the size of hominy, all set in a bed of thorns.
  9. If the plant is no longer good for your landscape design there will be a problem getting rid of it. Generally, landscapers no longer desire mature specimens as stock.
  10. Sago palms are a favorite food of indigenous islanders in Indonesia, but the sharp and hard outer shell is dangerous for all animals. It is in the same category as chicken bones, and may cause trips to the veterinarian.

A sago palm that needs trimming.
A sago palm that needs trimming.

How to Take Care of a Sago Palm That Hasn't Been Maintained?

This page is for everyone that has neglected or does not have a clue about sago palm care and maintenance.

About 10 years ago I had an overgrown mess and I could not find any trimming advice on the Internet. Our tree was little observed for a number of years and now it has trunks or three crowns on the top and numerous sprouts at the bottom.

The Internet does inform me that some plants will grow multi crowns. Usually, it is a male that will branch off. But the internet does not say specifically what to do when growth is out of hand. So I'm going to start cutting. I begin by cutting the leaves as close to the truck as possible. See photos below.

Step-by-Step Sago Palm Trimming Tutorial

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Use a long-handled branch trimmer. Start cutting off the spears from underneath the spears at the very top. Work around and toward the center, leaving one row of spears at the crown.This sago has three crowns. The center crown got a complete trimming.  I left a row of spears on the other crowns.All the crowns look like this in the center. There is barely enough room for a new batch of leaves to emerge. The curly new leaves grow from the center of the hairy cone.All the leaves were trimmed from the top.This dried, long, thick structure is what makes this particular plant a male. No seeds on this plant.
Use a long-handled branch trimmer. Start cutting off the spears from underneath the spears at the very top. Work around and toward the center, leaving one row of spears at the crown.
Use a long-handled branch trimmer. Start cutting off the spears from underneath the spears at the very top. Work around and toward the center, leaving one row of spears at the crown.
This sago has three crowns. The center crown got a complete trimming.  I left a row of spears on the other crowns.
This sago has three crowns. The center crown got a complete trimming. I left a row of spears on the other crowns.
All the crowns look like this in the center. There is barely enough room for a new batch of leaves to emerge. The curly new leaves grow from the center of the hairy cone.
All the crowns look like this in the center. There is barely enough room for a new batch of leaves to emerge. The curly new leaves grow from the center of the hairy cone.
All the leaves were trimmed from the top.
All the leaves were trimmed from the top.
This dried, long, thick structure is what makes this particular plant a male. No seeds on this plant.
This dried, long, thick structure is what makes this particular plant a male. No seeds on this plant.
Male crown of the sago palm: This is growing on the crown a few weeks after the branch cutting I did above.
Male crown of the sago palm: This is growing on the crown a few weeks after the branch cutting I did above.
Cycas revoluta
Cycas revoluta

The Difference Between Male and Female Sago

The biggest difference between the male and female is the growing habits.

The male: When it is big enough, the male will start to branch out or grow new crowns. It took a good fifteen years for me to see that fact. In fact, I was clueless about the difference for decades. Once your male plant is established and has a thick two to three foot trunk, you will see the branching effect.

The female: This plant will continue to grow and flush at the center, getting taller each year. If you are considering a queen sago for the yard, remember to think of it as a tree. Sagos are not little ornamental flower bed candidates.

Both males and females produce the pups.

Female Sago Palm with Seeds
Female Sago Palm with Seeds

Female Sago Palm

Let the next year's crop of leaves push the seeds under. No need to clean them out like I did the first year this happened.

My mother has watched birds eat and break open the seeds on this plant near her front window, but I would advise keeping animals and children away.

New Seed Crown on a Mature Female
New Seed Crown on a Mature Female

More About Sago Palms

  • Despite its difficult care, it is the most popular cycad of botanical gardens and of nursery stock being sold.
  • The plants grow slowly and that is probably why a 5 gallon specimen may seem a bit expensive at the nursery. The price is not because it is hard to grow, but because the nurserymen had to water it for more than 3 or 4 years.
  • In the 1980s, this plant started highlighting landscapes all over Southern California. From the street, they give a yard lots of visual impact and go well with other palms and tropical plants.
  • We decided to get one to block the line of view of the neighborhood mail box and our front window. Ours was planted in 1984. It was only two feet tall, with one row of spears. Our neighbor planted a bigger one in their front yard. The next year, their plant disappeared. People steal them in the middle of the night because they're so popular and expensive.

Trimming Pups from Sago Palm

Click thumbnail to view full-size
This photo shows the white scars of pup removal and some remaining pups. I take a trenching shovel and lodge it into the base of the pup. I use leverage outward with the long handle and the pup pops off.Here is a pup removed. The plant material is moist and crisp, allowing easy removal.This is the pile of sprouts I removed.Here is the big plant trimmed of all extra pups.
This photo shows the white scars of pup removal and some remaining pups. I take a trenching shovel and lodge it into the base of the pup. I use leverage outward with the long handle and the pup pops off.
This photo shows the white scars of pup removal and some remaining pups. I take a trenching shovel and lodge it into the base of the pup. I use leverage outward with the long handle and the pup pops off.
Here is a pup removed. The plant material is moist and crisp, allowing easy removal.
Here is a pup removed. The plant material is moist and crisp, allowing easy removal.
This is the pile of sprouts I removed.
This is the pile of sprouts I removed.
Here is the big plant trimmed of all extra pups.
Here is the big plant trimmed of all extra pups.
This plant was grown from a pup. It has not been sexed as of 2015. I hope it is a male.
This plant was grown from a pup. It has not been sexed as of 2015. I hope it is a male.

How to Plant Sago Pups

Rooted pups are very popular at yard and garage sales, but it is impossible to tell which is female or male. It takes 5-7 years for pups to mature and reveal their sex.

After I removed all the pups, I put them in the bin, but the next day someone had moved them all Why? Of course, I know why. My husband stuck them into the ground hoping to get new plants started, but he was doing it all wrong. Here's how you do it:

  1. The moist ends need to be dried first.
  2. Bury your new hopefuls only two inches. Leave the prickly spines exposed.
  3. Water them often until they take root.

Do You Have Sago Palms

Do You Like Your Sago Palm?

See results
Huge female sago palm.
Huge female sago palm.
Compressed seed head of sago palm.
Compressed seed head of sago palm.
This is my male sago. I cut off all pups and cut off the lowest row of leaves. In one month I had a new flush of leaves growing on all three trunks.
This is my male sago. I cut off all pups and cut off the lowest row of leaves. In one month I had a new flush of leaves growing on all three trunks.

I Trim Every Year

I know the practice of trimming the sago is controversial in plant circles. I have seen commercially trimmed sago of multi-trunks not fare well. One or two trunks may not do so well, and may not sprout a new set of leaves, turning brown and lifeless in a few months.

As I indicated, my plant has spent years between trimmings. It is only in the last few years that I have had the time to trim to my liking. I have been getting new flushes of leaves every year and I believe I will be able to enjoy my sago trimmed and kept slim.

I do not give it any fertilizer or extra watering. It is near a lawn and that is enough water for this plant. I live in SoCal with a dry climate. I give this plant a drastic cut every year and it grows back with no care at all. What do you think? My husband says I ruined it. It may look like a bad haircut, but it will grow out.

Readers' Comments (and Author's Answers)

"I am a gardener in the tropics and love the challenges from all plants, bring it on!" —Art

"We have three established sagos. I spent about an hour on a female which is easier of control. It is looking very stately. The male plant is overgrown again." —Sherry Venegas (author)

"I love sago palms! They are beautiful and stately to look at. Yes, they do have sharp spines all over their trunks, but these are very easy to avoid. Yes, they are poisonous, but the thought of a dog trying to eat a spiny Sago trunk just doesn't seem very plausible. By the way, sagos are actually edible and are the main staple in the diet of many pacific islanders. The pulp of the tree must be processed in such a way as to remove the toxins. Oh, and as to the prolific pups, that is my favorite part about sagos. The pups are so easy to harvest and cultivate. I have about a hundred or so I'm taking care of and it's so exciting to watch them sprout. It's like Christmas or something. I'm taking care of the pups until they get bigger, but I'm not sure what to do with them once they grow up. I might send them off to college." —Joseph Boggs

"Give your sago spouts as gifts!" —Sherry Venegas (author)

"Our local TV station reported that this entire plant is poisonous; nurseries do not warn potential buyers of this information..." —Joyce Spanos

"I know sagos are poisonous, but most breeds of dogs stay away. Our cocker spaniels , a beagle, and two Jack Russels lived their whole lives with the sagos in the backyard. But when in doubt, rip it out, is the best policy." —Sherry Venegas (author)

"We live in southern Texas and love our Sago plant! Actually hoping to plant a few more around our yard! :))" —Paula

"We just removed 5 sago palms from our backyard after I saw on local tv that they are deadly poison to animals. I love my dogs! Those palms had to go." —Brenda Vickery

"Your article is dead on. Palms should be grown on tropical islands. Excellent!" —Judy Specht from California

"I have never grown them. I don't even know if they grow where I live. But from the sounds of things, they are not a "people-friendly" plant and it would not work for me. They are beautiful plants, though." —June Campbell from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

"Great read, Sherry. My house was built in the 50s and when I bought it 3 years ago, there was a big sago palm just like yours in the front yard. Beautiful plant. It wasn't maintained since I bought it so it's getting out of control. It has multiple heads like the one in your photos and also 2-3 flowers with a crown (is that normal?). I managed to trim the outside part, but the interiors are a bit trickier to get to. When would you recommend doing the trimming? I live in the Central Valley (CA) it does frost for a good amount of the winter." —Randy the Noob

"Randy, by interior I thinking that you have leaves criss-crossing each other in the areas of the branching trucks. I would get in there with the long handled clippers and snip off all but the top newest row. Or if you want clip it clean, except for your high branch. One if the pictures I show how I did that one year. We do not get frost that often, so I would take precautions and wait till frost is past for the winter. The frost could burn and dry up the sago palm at the tip of the branches if it does not have these tall hard leaves protecting it. The male does get a cone shaped crown once a year that elongates as it matures over a few months." —Sherry Venegas (author)

"I had my landscaper move 4 of these from my backyard to the front yard. Considering Southern CA has had 1 of the worst droughts ever over the past 7 years (& I stopped watering long ago), these trees have surprisingly survived when other palm species have died off & I needed to have others removed altogether. I have 1 male that I'm aware of & I cut off the crown. I thought it was going to die after that, but it survived. I personally think they look great in my front yard. Yes, they're prickly and I've gotten stung by them on a few occasions, but I'm going all succulent combined with existing palms in the front yard since all the other vegetation died off. I just put them on a drip irrigation system - hopefully they don't grow too large." —Ben

"In the long haul if you are using less water the better for your pocket. If you have a natural sink in your yard a tree for shade, could be considered in the future, because this drought cycle will end sometime. We did water our sorry looking lawn a little and the birch in our sink faired okay. The already established birch is in front of a bay window and it is nice in the summer to have the filtered sun playing in the living room." —Sherry Venegas (author)

"One of the main reasons that you might not want this plant is that it can be very toxic (for anyone who decided to eat it: dogs, kids etc). It can kill if digested." —Gulia

"They take several years to grow large and flower. It is an easy investment as the plant is very low maintenance. Trimming is a pain and I get an alergic reaction from it. It is a neat plant and when grown very large you will be the envy of your block! As stated above, do not plant if it will be near pets or children. Other than that, it's fine." —Roldan

"Sagos require a Love/Hate relationship! They are incredibly beautiful and reign supreme in Houston, but can be vicious if you are not fully armored to deal with them. Here, they are low maintenance as compared to annuals and pups are plentiful, so share them :)"—BetsyofTexas

"I cut all the branches off of my male sage palm, probably a mistake. what I thought was a new thrush of branches. Is actually 4 cones growing. How quickly will the new branches grow back after the cones die off? I'm also in so cal." —Nate

"Nate, You should be seeing new trushes in six months, maybe sooner. Leave the cones on till they are dried, then break them off. You should be enjoying a clean plant till the beginning of next year. Watch the pups, though." —Sherry Venegas (author)

"We do not have them in our yard but many of our neighbors do. After reading this, I am not tempted to grow it. Will just continue to admire our neighbor's sago palms."—Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas

"Should you remove the gold crown from the top of the male. It seems like it has stopped the growth!" —Art

"Art, I would leave it for awhile. It should not interfere with the growth. Be sure to read the other Q&As in this column for more info." —Sherry Venegas (author)

"I just discovered I have a male plant. The cone shape in the center is pretty tall. When do I cut this or do I cut this off. And if it's OK to remove will it have seeds too?" —anonymous

"You can leave it as long as you want. It is an ornament, so to speak. Let it dry up on the plant. No seeds in it. Since you have a male you will see branching after the trunk gets 3 or 4 feet high. Have fun with your sago palm."—Sherry Venegas (author)

"If they would just top out at about 2 feet tall, they would be awesome!!!! They do need a lot of TLC but if you love gardening, the pruning isn't as bad as portrayed. With the right placement, they do give a great tropical appeal to any landscape." —anonymous

© 2012 Sherry Venegas

What Do You Think About the Sago Palm?

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      Jackie sullivan 4 days ago

      I have six sago palms that I want removed I’m looking for someone should wants them and remove them from my yard and repair my yard in exchange for the palms

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      Sherry Venegas 5 weeks ago from La Verne, CA

      Big job, Helen. With the root system established I do not think you will not have to worry about killing it. I would go for good spacing between each tallest tree. Leave seven or eight this year. Next year before spring, after studying it all year, maybe crop more. Be attentive of the pups that will sprout even from the stump here in the front. Snap them off with a trenching shovel. Where do you live? If you get 10 or more inches of rain a year try not watering at all.

      This will look very decorative with a little work.

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      mammakorb 6 weeks ago

      here's my progress - any advice greatly appreciated - hopefully links to my pictures copy in ok.

      https://tikiisland.shutterfly.com/pictures

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      Sherry Venegas 6 weeks ago from La Verne, CA

      Jerry, I know you are keep busy with that many. I have never seen 32 sagos growing in one yard.

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      Sherry Venegas 6 weeks ago from La Verne, CA

      Wow! It sounds like a major undertaking with your newly acquired plant. I have cut off pups as big as four inches. I am of the opinion that removing all of them would not harm the original plant. Make sure the cut areas dry out nicely before soaking or letting them get wet for a long time. I have seen sagos with one or a few pups remaining at the bottom to add fullness and interest to the bottom of a larger specimen. That would be up to you. The more you leave on, the more to take care of later.

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      mammakorb 6 weeks ago

      I have started trimming (hacking away at more like) a Sago that probably hasn't been trimmed in 10+ years at a house we just bought. My gardener started with a chain saw around the bottom and edges and now I've got clipers and heavy gloves pulling out dead crossed branches. I can see how the final result will be stunning with all the now adult pups. Can i cut some of them completely off at this point without harming the collective? I don't know how to upload picture otherwise i would.

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      Jerry Wallace 6 weeks ago

      We have 32 sagos in our front yard. They are a pain to maintain .....we LOVE the plant.

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      Sherry Venegas 6 weeks ago from La Verne, CA

      Josie, plant nurseries no longer want sagos as mature specimens for landscape design because there are too many available. Let us know if you find a solution for your unwanted sago palms.

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      josie 6 weeks ago

      i have 2 male sago palms and i wish i could get rid of them.They are about 6ft. tall.

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      cotton 7 weeks ago

      They said it wouldn't grow in upstate S.C. but i have had ten years and i am 20 miles from Hogback Mountain. It grows on the south side of the house.

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      Kit 8 weeks ago

      We have a dozen or so in our yard. We love them!

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      Mark M 2 months ago

      My German Shepherd is at our local Florida Animal Hospital on an IV. They did blood work and X-rays, and their diagnosis was she somehow ingested Sago seeds which are poisonous to dogs. They were surprised because most dogs know to stay away from them.

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      Jeff Sheldon 3 months ago

      Holy crap, you folks sound as if the sago palm is a creature lurking in the dark, ready to eat you.

      Cycas Revoluta, or sago palm is, in my mind one of the most striking and easy to grow members of the plant world. It is also one of the few plants to weather the ice age. I have been growing sagos in both southern California and high in the Sierra Nevada since the early seventies when my Dad and I imported seeds from Japan and germinated them in the San Fernando Valley. At that time they were a rarity.

      The sago's slow, ferny, statuesque, yet robust growth is the beauty of the plant. Paired with other dangerous plants, such as cacti, they provide a beautiful rock garden scene.

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      Sherry Venegas 3 months ago from La Verne, CA

      I agree that children should not play near this plant, as well as pets. The leaves and old wood is just too sharp for uncovered skin or hands. All parents should be made aware if you have a plant in your yard. This is an unfortunate story. Poor young guy. I bet that was no fun for him. I am going to add this as a extra caution.

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      Char 3 months ago

      I think they are dangerous. My son was about 7 or 8 playing outside at a friends house. They had a very large sago palm near where they were playing and my son must have brushed against the tree. the very sharp tip went into his hand between his thumb and index finger and didnt know it just that it hurt. Long story short it got infected went to his pediatrician he drained it, continued to hurt and a friend who is a plastic surgeon numbed it up several times and started looking for whatever was in there. After 15 mins of "digging" with his tool he finally touched something even deeper than where he was. He ended up pulling out the tip of the sago palm which embedded itself in his hand. The tip was about a half inch long. The Dr couldn't believe it was in there about 2 was. I would not have one where children will play

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      Sherry Venegas 3 months ago from La Verne, CA

      I would discourage that habit because there may not be poison but needle sharp objects are not good.

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      art 3 months ago

      I have three sago palms and our pup has chewed most of their leaves. She is still rumbustious and curious as pups are. Not posioned so she must be part Indonesian? Hum?

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      Sherry Venegas 4 months ago from La Verne, CA

      The brown cones are probably from lack of water, but as this year's golden ones show there is no hurt to the plant. The flush of the new fronds was thin this spring.

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      Patricia, S.D. County 4 months ago

      I have both males & females. They flower every year faithfully. Previously, the males would sprout long skinny brown curved & low hanging cones. But after our drought breaking rains, I am finally getting the beautiful golden upright cones. I am thrilled! My gardener keeps them trimmed & the pups pruned. We have lived in this house since 2001 & they were already here. We have five in the backyard & two in the front. Had to remove the female beside the driveway because she was scratching up the cars. I love them, especially with these beautiful golden cones. Were those scrawny brown ones healthy?

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      Sherry Venegas 7 months ago from La Verne, CA

      Do not give up on it. Give the plant water once a week if you are not getting this year's rain in your area. In spring it may sprout a new flush of leaves. Usually one flush is produced in the spring. I have dug up dead looking pups and found good roots on the underside.

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      Sherry Venegas 7 months ago from La Verne, CA

      The Sago is very widely available now and most tree removal companies prefer tall palms and the more exotic cycads. We always sell out of the small foot high sagos we start from pups at yard sales. We let them go for $10-$25, but ridding a year of a heavy weight sago is not something I have dealt with.

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      Ken1000 7 months ago

      Im thinking of getting rid of mine. Are they worth anything?

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      Glenn 8 months ago

      We put a miniature sago out in front yardcabout 5 months ago here in So. Cal. It wasnt the greenest plant but the only one we could find. Now all of the sago frawns are 100% brown. Looks dead but its not brittle to break off ? Is it too young to trim? Maybe I got one that was diseased?

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      Nick 8 months ago

      Clueless. They don't take eight years to mature they take at least 50. And you were so wrong about them being hard to care for. easiest plant on earth to care for because you don't have to do anything

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      Deborah Carr 3 years ago from Orange County, California

      I don't have this type of palm, but I am glad you wrote this article so that I am not tempted to buy one! Thanks for the info.

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      Sherry Venegas 3 years ago from La Verne, CA

      @julieannbrady: First ask him why and second ask if he is going to move them.

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      Sherry Venegas 3 years ago from La Verne, CA

      @myneverboredhands: It is only poisonous if ingested. The three dogs we have had never became, in any way, interested in it to chew the parts. Even the seeds that can dislodge and fall on the ground have been ignored. Now some babies will naturally bring almost everything to their mouth, that would be alarming.

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      julieannbrady 3 years ago

      Well, guess what? I was talking with Nelson over at the gym where I work out daily. It seems he has a female and male sago palm that he was wanting to "give" away. I mentioned my big back yard. Now, I am not so sure I want to take them! Excellent resource my dear.

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      myneverboredhands 5 years ago

      I just recently bought one for our apartment.. I saw it in the store and it looked so cute and rare (in fact I never saw the other one before in our area)..But after I got home and did research on it, I wasn't very pleased with search results: each inch of the plant is poisonous! and not only for animals for people as well:(

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      KimGiancaterino 5 years ago

      Our next door neighbor has one of these, but it's still fairly small. I didn't know they were poisonous. Palms are pretty to look at, but high maintenance. My husband and I have both been to the emergency room to have toothpick-sized date palm tines removed from hands and feet. Ouch!

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      Darcie French 5 years ago from Abbotsford, BC

      These plants sound like they would make good natural protection when located close to the house, like the first floor windows. But they sure do sound like a lot of work.

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      KKBOOKSTORE 5 years ago

      i have a few and yes they are big but if you keep them up they look great. You could also sell the big ones and keep the pups incase your n a bind

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      Sherry Venegas 5 years ago from La Verne, CA

      @recipebox: You should be fine, if you do not ignore it. Don't let those pups on the bottom take over.

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      Stephanie Tietjen 5 years ago from Albuquerque, New Mexico

      Very interesting story...it reminds me of a Yucca that grows similarly. If you had a very large property, it might be good planted away from the house. I removed one that was next to my house because I was tired of getting stuck.

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      recipebox 5 years ago

      I have a sago plant from the time I bought my house so far it is still young and not creating any problems I guess it will take a very long time for it to grow big and cause problems. Till then it just looks great in my garden.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Beautiful plants! I always wanted one when I lived in Texas. I had no idea how much work they were! Thanks for the sharing!

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      intermarks 5 years ago

      I grow my sago palm in a big flower pot, so it doesn't really give me much trouble.

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      Sherry Venegas 5 years ago from La Verne, CA

      @ohcaroline: You can keep it as bonsai, but I have not tried it. All my tempts at bonsai were not successful.

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      sheriangell 5 years ago

      I had a few Sago Palms when I lived in Florida.....what a learning experience. When we first moved there, I decided to transplant two of them.... first I dug and dug and dug.... not to mention the cuts on my arms from those razor sharp (leaves).....Every year I had to cut them back and while doing so would silently wish that nature would take them from me so I wouldn't have to maintain them anymore. They are quite attractive though....

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      MillBucks 5 years ago

      We have about 15 Sago's planted throughout our yard and we just love them, of course they do require work to maintain but the results are worth it.

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      Sherry Venegas 5 years ago from La Verne, CA

      @CruiseReady: haha

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      Sherry Venegas 5 years ago from La Verne, CA

      @Grasmere Sue: Cheap skates. They want instant gratification of the bigger plant without watering it and tending it lovingly. If they ask for a pup from this plant I would give them 10!