How to Make a Naked Portafilter for Your Espresso Machine

Updated on December 15, 2017

Typical Two-Spout Portafilter

What Is a Portafilter?

The naked portafilter is a fairly new innovation in the old process of making espresso. Typically, a portafilter, which holds the coffee grounds and gets clamped to the espresso machine, has one or two spouts that direct the coffee into the espresso cup. By removing these spouts and making it "naked," the coffee maker can clearly see how effective their coffee extraction process is, enabling direct feedback and greater quality control.

Finished: The Naked Portafilter

Why the Naked Portafilter Is So Great

The naked, bottomless, or crotchless portafilter is a great innovation that provides the home enthusiast or barista with a fantastic training tool. There are many variables to control when making a shot of espresso. Improper grinding, measuring, or tamping of the coffee can result in a wide variety of bad espresso brewing. The naked portafilter offers a clear window into the coffee extraction process allowing common errors to be seen quickly and easily.

Machining a Naked Portafilter

Below are the steps I used to make my own naked portafilter. I made use of a metal lathe and some basic lathe cutting tools. The pictures below are of two La Pavona portafilters: one chrome, one brass. Please understand that there are a million ways to approach this simple machining project. This is the way I have approached it with the tools I have.

1. Unscrewing double spout

The spout threaded on the portafilter with a thread-locker. Using a vise makes unscrewing the spout much easier.
The spout threaded on the portafilter with a thread-locker. Using a vise makes unscrewing the spout much easier.

2. Removing the portafilter handle

Before clamping the portafilter on the lathe, it is important to remove the handle.
Before clamping the portafilter on the lathe, it is important to remove the handle.

3. Clamp portafilter in lathe chuck

Here is the portafilter clamped into the lathe on a 3-jaw chuck.
Here is the portafilter clamped into the lathe on a 3-jaw chuck.

4. Cutting off spout threads

Using a lathe cutting tool, I slowly cut off the spout threads, millimeter by millimeter.
Using a lathe cutting tool, I slowly cut off the spout threads, millimeter by millimeter.

5. Spout threads removed

The final cut to remove the spout threads.
The final cut to remove the spout threads.

6. Time to open up the hole

Once the spout thread is removed, the resulting hole needs to be widened.
Once the spout thread is removed, the resulting hole needs to be widened.

7. Boring open the hole

A boring cutting tool allows the hole to be opened up from the inside out.
A boring cutting tool allows the hole to be opened up from the inside out.

8. Nearly finished boring the hole

I made the final hole about the same diameter as my coffee basket.
I made the final hole about the same diameter as my coffee basket.

9. Adding a chamfer to the hole edge

Chamfering the hole edge removes any sharp metal burrs.
Chamfering the hole edge removes any sharp metal burrs.

10. Machining is complete!

Naked portafilter in my espresso machine

Here is the Naked Portafilter (with the handle reinstalled) with basket full of coffee, mounted in my espresso machine.
Here is the Naked Portafilter (with the handle reinstalled) with basket full of coffee, mounted in my espresso machine.

Pulling a shot with the naked portafilter

The Naked Portafilter lets you see all the beauty and glory of a nice espresso shot!
The Naked Portafilter lets you see all the beauty and glory of a nice espresso shot!

Questions & Answers

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      • profile image

        Gary 

        4 years ago

        Would you do this to my portafilter if I paid you?

      • profile image

        Rancilio Silvia 

        7 years ago

        What a cool article. I tried doing this a couple of years ago with a Dremel tool and ruined my portafilter, but this looks like a much better way of doing it.

      • profile image

        Stephen Bolter 

        8 years ago

        Nice article, I was wondering how to do this, thanks

      • profile image

        Gaz 

        9 years ago

        Ahh, if only I had a metal lathe!

      • Paraglider profile image

        Dave McClure 

        11 years ago from Kyle, Scotland

        There we go. On the strength of this one and your A-bike which I commented on tonight, I've joined your fan-club. Quality stuff. Thanks.

      • profile image

        comedyaddict 

        11 years ago

        What an awesome idea. I used to own a cafe in New Zealand, and used to "train" some of our regular patrons about what happens on an espresso machine. This would have been a great demonstration!

      • profile image

        Kathy 

        11 years ago

        That is AWESOME - it looks like you're pulling pure crema, not even espresso!

      • profile image

        George 

        12 years ago

        This is an impressive Hub! Great photos and explanation.

      • vic profile image

        vic 

        12 years ago

        That espresso oozing into the cup sure looks rich and delicious!

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