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How to Identify Venomous House Spiders

How to identify venomous house spiders.
How to identify venomous house spiders. | Source

What and What Not to Be Afraid of

"Oh my God, kill it! KILL IT!"

Outbursts like these are common throughout much of the United States and, indeed, the world, when a spider's cover is blown and it is forced to skitter this way and that along the wall or across the living room carpet to avoid being, as suggested above, speedily smashed.

It is unfortunate that so many of these harmless eight-legged critters have to pay such a price for our unfounded fears and instinctive squishing behaviors, especially since they work so hard to rid our homes of ever creepier (in the author's personal opinion) pests such as silverfish, fleas, bed bugs, gnats, and flies.

I find that the basis for most fears of spiders is the fact that most people don't know the difference between those that are harmful to humans and those that are perfectly capable of coexisting with us peacefully. And so, in the spirit of enlightenment, I have devised a way to help any and all who are curious learn about which spiders pose a danger and which do not.

"Be careful of me. I don't want to bite, but if I do, I can pack quite a punch!"
"Be careful of me. I don't want to bite, but if I do, I can pack quite a punch!"

. Biggest Threats

The leading ladies and gentlemen on this list are of course the ever-beautiful female Latrodectus hesperus (black widow spider) and her renowned accomplice the Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider). The runner-up to and lesser known than these two is Tegenaria agrestis (hobo spider).

Black Widow

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Few spiders are as recognizable as the black widow.Black widows are Nature's very own pest controllers.Black widows are experts at web building, and are extremely helpful in vineyards where they catch tiny insects such as gnats and flies.
Few spiders are as recognizable as the black widow.
Few spiders are as recognizable as the black widow.
Black widows are Nature's very own pest controllers.
Black widows are Nature's very own pest controllers. | Source
Black widows are experts at web building, and are extremely helpful in vineyards where they catch tiny insects such as gnats and flies.
Black widows are experts at web building, and are extremely helpful in vineyards where they catch tiny insects such as gnats and flies. | Source

Female black widows are perhaps the most easily identifiable spider in human history. The striking red markings on their undersides are a dead giveaway to their species. Whether the red mark is in the shape of an hourglass or a simply a dot, it is safe to assume that any shiny black spider with a bulbous abdomen falls under this category. The males of this species are smaller, shyer, and less venomous than their female counterparts. In fact, there has been much speculation as to whether or not they are more deadly than the common garden spider! Also, they look nothing like their women; they're thin and usually mottled brown or gray.

Black widows, like cockroaches, can be found anywhere in the United States providing there is:

  • A stable source of heat (such as a human dwelling)
  • An ample supply of food (flies, woodlice, other spiders, etc.)
  • Dark places (the space under your bed, in your shoe closet, etc.)

They are more prominent in warmer states because they can breed and catch food outside. Natural enemies of this spider do exist and consist mainly of wasps such as the blue mud dauber and the spider wasp.

Black Widow Bites

Source

Two red marks are the first sign of a black widow bite. Some spider bites are "dry" and no venom is injected. However, if venom is injected, then the following symptoms are often muscle cramps and spasms near the site of the bite, fever, and nausea. If this happens, see a doctor immediately. Stay calm and apply concentrated heat to the bite to minimize the spread of the venom and alleviate pain.

Brown Recluse

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Brown recluses have a distinctively smooth appearance compared to most other spiders their size.
Brown recluses have a distinctively smooth appearance compared to most other spiders their size.
Brown recluses have a distinctively smooth appearance compared to most other spiders their size.
Source
Source

While the black widow is easily identified by her shiny black exterior, large abdomen, and red shape on the underside, the brown recluse is less easily recognized because of his dull colors. The famed 'violin shape' (the base of the violin starts near the eyes, and the neck of the instruments points down toward the abdomen), which is supposed to be the telltale sign for this species is sadly not confined to brown recluses, nor do all brown recluses possess it. Perhaps the only foolproof way of identifying these tricky arachnids is to count their eyes. It's true! While most spiders have eight eyes, the brown recluse is unique in that it has only six. Also, the abdomen of the recluse spider is devoid of markings, and their legs are smooth with no thick hairs.

Brown recluses have a smaller range than most people think, not straying further west than the Rocky Mountains and rarely venturing north of Nebraska. They prefer quieter, darker, and warmer places to raise their families, so they don't travel with humans to new places as often as black widows do.

Because the brown recluse is so excellent at hiding, there have not been many studies on them outside of research on the effects of their bites. So, the statement that the brown recluse has no natural enemy should be taken with a grain of salt. People who have watched and collected data from the brown recluses in their homes have noted seeing other spiders (particularly the jumping spider) attack and kill them with relative ease.

Brown Recluse Bites

Red itching skin is the first symptom of the bite of a brown recluse spider. The area then develops into a blister, followed by an open sore, which in turn is accompanied by a rash of tiny red dots. Fever and nausea can also occur. If you are bitten by a brown recluse, see a doctor immediately. Stay calm and apply concentrated heat to the bite to minimize the spread of the venom and alleviate pain. The venom of a brown recluse causes necrosis, or the death of tissue, which can take a long time to heal.

Hobo Spider

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Hobo spiders are often confused with giant house spiders or brown recluses.Hobo spiders have 8 eyes, like most spiders, whereas brown recluses have 6.Hobo spiders may not be as dangerous as people once thought.
Hobo spiders are often confused with giant house spiders or brown recluses.
Hobo spiders are often confused with giant house spiders or brown recluses.
Hobo spiders have 8 eyes, like most spiders, whereas brown recluses have 6.
Hobo spiders have 8 eyes, like most spiders, whereas brown recluses have 6. | Source
Hobo spiders may not be as dangerous as people once thought.
Hobo spiders may not be as dangerous as people once thought. | Source

The hobo spider is one that more people need to be aware of. They are the real cause of countless so-called "brown recluse bites." The brown recluse is often wrongfully blamed because both species look related at a glance, and their bite patterns and symptoms are similar. But a second look at these critters can identify them in minute's time. Hobo spiders, unlike brown recluses, have a mottled coloration and distinctive 'herringbone' patterns on their abdomen. Their legs are also hairier than those of the brown recluse.

The easiest way to differentiate brown recluses from hobo spiders is by geographic location. The hobo spider was introduced to the Port of Seattle from Europe in the late 1920s, and they have since spread throughout the Northwestern United States and Western Canada. Brown recluses do not live in the Northwest or Canada.

Fortunately for us Northwesterners, the hobo spider has a nice list of natural predators, particularly the crab spider, Pardosa wolf spider, and again our friend the jumping spider.

Hobo Spider Bites

Purported hobo spider bites have had symptoms similar to the bites of brown recluse spiders, though no fatalities have been reported. In fact, scientists debate whether this spider's venom can cause the necrosis of human tissue at all. The research is murky because most people who report bites do not capture the spider, so experts have not been able to identify whether the hobo spider is actually associated with dangerous bites. If bitten, it is imperative that the spider be captured or preserved as entirely as possible, and then sent to a lab (many state universities have labs that are appropriate for this) to aid in identification and future research.

Where Dangerous Spiders Are Found

Spider
States and Regions
Black Widow
Usually the southern United States, although they can be found as far north as Canada
Brown Recluse
Primarily Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Colorado.
Hobo Spider
Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Northern California, Western Canada
"Don't hurt me, I'm a friend!"
"Don't hurt me, I'm a friend!"

. Harmless Helpers:

Now that the scary stuff is out of the way, here are a few 'creepy crawlies' that will not only creep up on all of the aforementioned threats, but will also keep the crawling population of fleas, mites, and moths on the down-low. Not to mention they pose no danger to pets, children, or adults in the home. I'm talking about the endearing Salticidae family (jumping spiders), the docile Achaearanea tepidariorum (common house spider), and the gentle-but-giant Tegenaria duellica (giant house spider).

Jumping Spider

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Jumping spiders are very small.Jumping spiders have a charming appearance.Who could no to that cute lil' face?
Jumping spiders are very small.
Jumping spiders are very small. | Source
Jumping spiders have a charming appearance.
Jumping spiders have a charming appearance. | Source
Who could no to that cute lil' face?
Who could no to that cute lil' face? | Source

If you ever see one of these little guys hopping around on your furniture, don't be alarmed. These curious spiders are one of your greatest friends in the pest-ridding business. They are easy to identify because of their unique eye pattern, and inquisitive behavior. If approached, instead of scurrying away like other spiders would, the jumping spider will jump and turn to face the advancer, sometimes even looking up and studying them. Jumping spiders are regarded by many as being 'cute' because of their antics and large eyes.

Jumping spiders have excellent vision, as their giant eyes would suggest, and can in fact see better than any other spider and debatably any other insect in the world. Using their vision, they can perform fast, complicated maneuvers around objects to get to their prey, which they will bite and subdue with their tiny fangs. Because of their speed and eyesight, jumping spiders are capable of besting prey larger and more venomous than themselves, and this author has personally witnessed them snatch flies right out of the air.

There are over 5,000 species of jumping spider in the world, but the most helpful seem to be those of the family Salticus and Phiddipus, such as the zebra spider or bold jumping spider.

Common House Spider

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Round and shiny, the common house spider can be confused for a black widow at first glance.But common house spiders actually look more like mottled bird eggs than a black widow.Common house spiders are excellent web builders.
Round and shiny, the common house spider can be confused for a black widow at first glance.
Round and shiny, the common house spider can be confused for a black widow at first glance. | Source
But common house spiders actually look more like mottled bird eggs than a black widow.
But common house spiders actually look more like mottled bird eggs than a black widow. | Source
Common house spiders are excellent web builders.
Common house spiders are excellent web builders. | Source

Unlike the jumping spider, which walks around with an air of adventure, the common house spider prefers to keep a quiet profile in a corner of your garage or basement. Sometimes referred to as 'cobweb spiders,' they are gray to brown in color, with speckling on their abdomen that could be likened to the mottling found on wild bird eggs. Because of their similar size and shape, common house spiders are sometimes mistaken for black widows, but it is important to note the color of the spider before jumping to conclusions. Common house spiders are not black and have no red markings.

They are passive hunters, meaning that they make webs and wait for prey to come to them. They are excellent in keeping the numbers of destructive moths, flies, and mosquitoes down. They will even tackle wasps and yellow jackets, which may be important if you bring firewood into your home since wasps will sometimes hibernate in the lumber). They will be content to live quietly by a window in your attic and pose no threat to humans.

Giant House Spider

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Don't let their size intimidate you. Giant house spiders are very beneficial.Note the hairy legs and the herringbone pattern on the abdomen here. Very different from the smooth appearance of the brown recluse.Giant house spiders grow to be much larger than Hobo spiders.
Don't let their size intimidate you. Giant house spiders are very beneficial.
Don't let their size intimidate you. Giant house spiders are very beneficial.
Note the hairy legs and the herringbone pattern on the abdomen here. Very different from the smooth appearance of the brown recluse.
Note the hairy legs and the herringbone pattern on the abdomen here. Very different from the smooth appearance of the brown recluse. | Source
Giant house spiders grow to be much larger than Hobo spiders.
Giant house spiders grow to be much larger than Hobo spiders. | Source

The giant house spider has a horrible reputation and causes a lot of panic in Northwestern homes because it is easily mistaken for the hobo spider. And while there is no definite way to distinguish the two at a quick glance, giant house spiders tend to be more yellowish in color, with distinctive black stripes on the abdomen. Also, they can reach a leg span of four inches while the hobo spider will typically only span a single modest inch.

Although a giant house spider looks similar to a hobo spider, their risks to humans could not be more different. The giant house spider's venom is harmless (nothing worse than a bumblebee's sting), and they actually kill and eat hobo spiders themselves, making them an excellent addition to any crawlspace, basement, or garage. In fact, they are considered the best deterrent against a hobo spider invasion.

Because of their size, the giant house spider can dispose of a larger numbers of prey, as well as take on much bigger insects than the jumping spider or common house spider could.

Spiders only bite when they are afraid of being killed.
Spiders only bite when they are afraid of being killed.

Precautions to Avoid Spider Bites

None of the spiders listed here bite humans very often. They need their venom to catch their food and do not want to waste it unless they are in danger of being killed. However, sometimes spiders will hide in places they think are safe, but will ultimately lead to an unfortunate interaction between them and humans. Terrified spiders that think they will be crushed can sometimes bite out of defense. Here are some tips you can use to prevent this from happening in your home:

  • Remove your bed skirt. This is good practice to prevent any creepy crawly in the house (ants, silverfish, etc) from cuddling up with you in bed! If the only way for a spider to crawl into your bed is by going up one of the bed's legs—which are usually made of metal, polished wood, or other slick surfaces—it is much less likely to happen.
  • Do not store clothes on the floor. If clothes are left on the floor, vigorously shake them out before putting them on.
  • Bang your shoes on the ground and thoroughly shake out gloves before putting either of them on.
  • When storing things in the basement or garage, seal them so that nothing can get inside. You can do this by putting them in a tied or sealed plastic bag or by taping the corners of cardboard boxes closed.
  • Remove anything that the spiders can crawl under or between. For example, avoid leaving tarps and cardboard on the ground, and move firewood so that it is not stacked near the house.
  • Wear protective clothing such as gloves, closed-toe shoes, and long pants when going into areas spiders may find safe, such as under the house, in crawl spaces, or storage spaces.
  • If you notice there are dangerous spiders in your house, you can set out sticky traps. However, if you have no reason to think that there are any dangerous spiders, it may be better to skip this step, as some spiders like the giant house spider are very beneficial to you.

In Closing:

Hopefully now, with the knowledge of both the dangers and helpers that you may find in your home, your mind will be put at relative ease. As of yet, there is no manmade pesticide or trap more effective against a population of harmful insects than a good old-fashioned family of spiders. They definitely deserve better recognition for the work they do. Welcome to the wonderful world of knowledge; I pray you use it wisely!

Comments? Questions? Let Shaddie know. 362 comments

Chris Ranch 3 weeks ago

I grew up terrified of spiders, then Gary Larson came out with a cartoon showing two spiders at the bottom of a children's slide having put a web across the slide. One says to the other "if this

goes well, we'll dine tonight!"

Nowadays I go out to feed the chickens in the morning and have

to pass through several areas with strands of web. I recall the cartoon and laugh inside - and admire the spidey ambitions!

I've come to appreciate the Spidys help in the outdoors and can

confidently transport indoor spiders outside...unless they are

too big...


usain bolt 5 weeks ago

my daddy died


Atrieux1000 5 weeks ago

Hello Shaddie, So glad to have read your spider postings. I was recently bit by a brown recluse on my finger, totally in ignorance of what it was, UNTIL my entire left hand blew up literally like a balloon and the PAIN!!!! I have had spinal taps, 3 harrington-rod spinal fusions, 2 cervical fusions and two sons (Oh and 2 migranes) Put them ALL in a one-shot-culmination and you MIGHT be close! I also had a rather large blister on the finger,..STILL No Clue.Until I was spraying for mosquitos when about ten minutes later a dead spider slid down the tile behind my sink. I am familiar w/ spiders, DID have a Large house spider crawl up my leg-in bed-when I was six, so I have a phobia. Don't mind ANY other living thing..rats, snakes, lizards etc. Moving right along, I had gone to my Dr. AFTER going out into our garage & SCREAMING at the top of my lungs and sobbing my heart out,much to the distress of my boyfriend who {I assured him} could do nothing to help me with this excruciating pain. Dr.{Naturally} hadn't a clue what it was ,but gave me steroids of some kind. An hour later I was infinitely better, and later that evening I miraculously found the little B- Sturd in the flesh,{So to speak} My Question - now that I know from other posts that they in fact DO live in Florida, How do they produce off-spring? Also, can more than one live in the same house? Ours is a typical 2 bedroom,with large screen-room..Do you know?


herman 5 weeks ago

these spirdes are dangers


Isha 6 weeks ago

hi do know any small house spiders that are orange and have long front and hind legs and the rest the legs short please let me know because i got bitten by ne on my leg in the washroom


Cduffy 7 weeks ago

Adíos! Gracias.


Kasey 8 weeks ago

I live in Maryland and I have now seen a large brown spider with strips 3x in my my house! It looks like the giant house spider but it jumps and I don't know if it's poisonous. I have a baby so I am freaking out.


Syrius Lee 2 months ago

No *REAL* hobo spider has been proved until now...

Most of people thinks that they have been bitten oernight by spider, but why an insect that doesn't feed on human would ever do that to a non-moving person, according to the fact that this species is peaceful...

wtf

I don't know what happens there, they have the EXACT SAME SPECIE

(Eratigena agrestis) in Europe and it is totally inoffensive there...

If you trust more in what is being said than the facts, you should try to put one (hobo sp.) on you thumb and gently squeeze it whit your index and see the reaction...


Emly 2 months ago

Do u think a hobo spider can be in florida reading this cite i think i have iditified a nasty beast in my moms room


Frantic girl 2 months ago

Hello, just the other night about 10:30pm I sat up on the sofa and practically had a heart attack seeing a bigger than normal spider on my cream carpet staring at me..I legged out of the door to get the hoover which does tend to kill them but after emptying the hoover funnel it was still alive! Clearly enjoying the dust the hoover had picked up..My eyes darted across the room all evening as I hate spiders and that is the second huge one in the last two weeks. Its is September now in the UK and chances are after our last overnight thunderstorm may have aroused them...I live in a bungalow so the downsides of being on the ground floor isn't great. woodlice are a pain too but aren't as icky as spiders. I found one in the kitchen sink after being away for a few days which I also gasped. I seriously hate how big they are but can't identify them as they're not the usually black ones we get but of a lighter colour. Glad you all dislike them too can't wait for the autumn to end as usually by November they're dead..like the wasps...!! Conkers tend to fend them off but didn't get any this year.


barbara 2 months ago

I have two large spiders in the front of my house one on the right and one on the left .I never saw either of these before it looks something like the wolf,but there are four yellow lines on each side of its body ,they both have webs large ones. the other spider is mostly black. they are right at my front door , tried to get ride of them but they come right back. then today while cutting the grass I saw a snake that I never seen before. Are these creatures coming in from another country ?


emma 3 months ago

i still dont know what spider is in my basement its yellow and black and its fairly big i call it claude


VooDoo66 3 months ago

I just found one on my outside wall, and I can't figure out what type it is, I took a picture of it, and I wanted to share with you and hope that y'all can tell me what type it is, OH and yes I'm very afraid of it, just trying to look at your pictures gave me the hibbie jibbies, and goosebumps


tracey marriott 4 months ago

Hi my name is tracey marriott and i took a picture of a hobo spider

and i dont now what to do as it's in the wall


Aine 13 4 months ago

I know u say we shouldn't kill spider and we probably shouldn'twhen I was 9 I woke up one night and a spider was upside down on top bunks mattress looking at me while I was sleeping on the bottom I was so scared of it I sad and cried and dident move . Until after an 1 hour one of pat

Rents hear me . This spider was really big and hairy .


muimup 4 months ago

I sees dem spidre s make a face an ting


Sarah 4 months ago

There is a spider that has been living on my skirting board. Just below some pipes under the radiator . It is huge , quite a dark brown with hairy legs and moves soo fast. It doesnt seem to like climbing walls because hes always on the floor. It had a pointy belly/sac. Do you think you know what it might be. P.s i live in the UK


Carmen 5 months ago

I like jumping spiders, they're cute looking and whenever one appears in the house I keep it around. Unfortunately whenever we get house spiders though I have to kill it because they will often bite at night and my mom has a huge phobia of them. But jumping spiders are good lol


Kristina 5 months ago

Found a dead spider today in our basement. Red upper body, black lower body and red legs. I got a picture, but since it's dead, it's a lousy picture. Would you know what kind of side it is? I'm in Canada.


Bee 6 months ago

Thank you for this, I really appreciate not only how you described the spiders & their characteristics, but the information about our spider friends, & how you emphasized how they benefit us. I usually stand up for friendly spiders, I recently moved to Oregon from Missouri, & I've noticed my ignorance of this region's eight-leggers has resulted in me being up in arms. I now know I don't have to worry about brown recluse anymore (& that I killed some giant house spiders ): ), I thank you for reminding me the importance of investigation before action instead of contempt prior to investigation


HeatherJo 7 months ago

I have orb weavers covering almost every inch of my trailer, on the outside, and I just leave them alone unless they spin a web in my walking path. Hate walking into ever. *chills* I live in the woods, And thankfully have only seen a wolf spider once, it was dead unfortunately, not my fault, it got trapped under the house in a box I guess. All spiders give me the heebie jeebies but knowing the dangerous ones is always helpful.


Taranwanderer profile image

Taranwanderer 10 months ago

I treat ALL spiders - except Daddy Long Legs - as venomous hahaha and just use the electric fly swatter on them. Helps me avoid any unfortunate incidences with the little things. Great hub of info, by the ay.

http://hubpages.com/education/Simba-the-Lion-The-K...


zeke2100 profile image

zeke2100 14 months ago

I had a black widow infestation in my yard in AL a few years ago, and left alone, they only multiply on your property until they get inside and then the real danger begins. I went out and eliminated at least 20, one at a time. My experience led me to write a few hubs on it, but also really got rid of my fear of spiders. Totally gone now after taking out the Queen of death, known as the black widow.


bruce 14 months ago

I like ur page but i have found a brownish tan spider hanging in my back door and was hopeing to find out what it is...


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 18 months ago from Washington state Author

I sincerely applaud your efforts to leave spiders alone in your home! But I also don't blame you for wanting to rehome those two before they started going all National Geographic on your bathroom counter. Many people have their limits, even if they are friends to spiders. For me, my limit is the bed. But fortunately I have never found a spider in or on my bed, so I've never had to rehome one. I also want to extend my appreciation that you recognize wolf spiders as being beneficial. Many people are terrified of them because of their size and their name, but they are amazing house friends that I also like to keep around. Good on ya!


DrHossenfoffer profile image

DrHossenfoffer 18 months ago

A couple of days ago I stumbled across something that gave me pause. A grass spider simply had set up shop in my bathroom above my sink. He had made his little haphazard web, as they often do, before they actually make their funnels. I had never seen how long it took one to create a full funnel, so imagine my surprise when I come in the next day and the darn thing is stretched across half of my sink cove. Cheeky! I left him alone, as he took his share of moths and did no harm, and I enjoyed looking at him. Well, I came in tonight and, to my shock, a VERY LARGE hobo spider was in the process of coming out from under the sink and stalking my new friend. I decided I had had enough; I scooped them both into separate jars (not fun) and tossed them outside. Typically I have quite a number of wolf and jumping spiders in my house during the summer and I leave them be so they can do their job. (I've even had to defend them on occasion against my more highly strung friends.) But this latest episode was too much. I won't kill them, but I'm not getting into any duels for my toothbrush, either.


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 18 months ago from Washington state Author

Pat, unfortunately without a picture I can't give you much information. But one clue you gave me tells me that it was definitely not a recluse - the fact that it hung down from a thread of silk. Brown recluses do not spin silk when they walk around, as they aren't big webbers (they do make webs, but they are low to the ground and look more like tunnels than actual webs). By your description, it sounds more like an orb weaver of some sort (they can be large and have round abdomens). Orb weavers are not typically house spiders. She may have just been lost.


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 18 months ago from Washington state Author

You certainly may. My e.mail is Shaddiewolf@Hotmail.com


Pat Flaherty 18 months ago

Yesterday when I came out to the kitchen there was a big (and I mean BIG!!!) spider on the wall just above the stove. It was at least 2 inches tall, had clear long legs and a round (completely round) abdomen a separation than a large head. I've never seen anything like it. I ran out of the room looking for my fly swatter, then thought something that large would splatter the wall. When I cam back it had started to move down the wall, spun some web out of it's butt and slid to the floor, went under the trash can and disappeared. I don't know where it is, scared the hell right out of me!!! I've never seen it before or since. I had thoughts it might have migrated in from the garage/yard that's all dug up. WOW!!! I looked today for at least 2 hours for the same kind of spider, house spiders were brown (tarnish like this one) but no where near as large. Though it did say the females are larger. Brown recluse are larger, but not that big and they have a violin thing on their backs, this one did not. What I'm worried about is that might have been a female and the large abdomen might be an egg sack. then I'd have 10 billion spiders!!! They carry hundreds (you know survival of the species thing). I've called the U after looking at their website, no one answered. But I left a message. I'm hoping they can come capture it (might want it to study the thing). But I do know this I feel crawly and am scared to go down stairs thinking the damn thing is on the rail or ??? Under my feet or in the washer??? It did say to about house spiders that they like heat would could explain why it was by the stove. In nearly 12 years I've seen plenty of crawly things, but never one like this before!!! Can anyone tell me what it is? Thank you


Pat Flaherty 18 months ago

Yesterday when I came out to the kitchen there was a big (and I mean BIG!!!) spider on the wall just above the stove. It was at least 2 inches tall, had clear long legs and a round (completely round) abdomen a separation than a large head. I've never seen anything like it. I ran out of the room looking for my fly swatter, then thought something that large would splatter the wall. When I cam back it had started to move down the wall, spun some web out of it's butt and slid to the floor, went under the trash can and disappeared. I don't know where it is, scared the hell right out of me!!! I've never seen it before or since. I had thoughts it might have migrated in from the garage/yard that's all dug up. WOW!!! I looked today for at least 2 hours for the same kind of spider, house spiders were brown (tanish like this one) but nowhere near as large. Though it did say the females are larger. Brown recluse are larger, but not that big and they have a violin thing on their backs, this one did not. What I'm worried about is that might have been a female and the large abdomen might be an egg sack. then I'd have 10 billion spiders!!! They carry hundreds (you know survival of the species thing). I've called the U after looking at their website, no one answered. But I left a message. I'm hoping they can come capture it (might want it to study the thing). But I do know this I feel crawly and am scared to go down stairs thinking the damn thing is on the rail or ??? Under my feet or in the washer??? It did say to about house spiders that they like heat would could explain why it was by the stove. In nearly 12 years I've seen plenty of crawly things, but never one like this before!!!


HottyToddy Drew 18 months ago

can i send a picture to be identified?


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 18 months ago from Washington state Author

I'm sorry you got the heebie jeebies! Spiders aren't really the cuddly type, don't worry too much :)


lyoness913 profile image

lyoness913 18 months ago from Overland Park, KS

This is very interesting but now I have the heebie jeebies.. and I KNOW there are spiders sleeping on me.. I just KNOW it!


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Chriswillman90 18 months ago from Parlin, New Jersey

Very informative and interesting that could give you the chills through the imagery alone


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 19 months ago from Washington state Author

Wow, that's an amazing story! I'm glad your cat survived! A lot of pets don't make it through recluse bites like that. He was lucky he was only bit on his tail and not closer to his body's core. Very lucky kitty.


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Besarien 19 months ago

I live in western NC used to not have anything against spiders. I would collect them and put them outside. Live and let live. Then my indoor cat got bitten by a brown recluse a few years ago. His tail swelled to enormous proportions. He was in terrible pain. We thought he was going to have to have it amputated. An operation to remove some necrotic tissue plus antibiotics and anti-inflammatories finally turned him around. He fully recovered. I did not. I kill any spider who even has the nerve to look like a brown recluse now. Black and gray spiders are the only ones who make it out of here alive.


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davidbarcomb 2 years ago from Boston, MA

Creepy


Justin 2 years ago

House spiders are a particular problem in the estate where I live due to their wandering. Last month I'd had enough so sealed all gaps and holes and placed netting over all windows. Cleaned house thoroughly - Result! No house spiders seen for weeks, I can sleep at night.


londonaccountants profile image

londonaccountants 2 years ago from London, UK

Number of spiders have gone ballistic here in the UK since all the wet weather earlier in the year. Can't clear a room of spiders one night and not have a fresh set appear the very next day!


Shaddie profile image

Shaddie 2 years ago from Washington state Author

Tom, that is a real shame. It's unfortunate that animals have to be so misunderstood when there is so much information on them, easily accesible by the internet. People need to evolve!


tom yam profile image

tom yam 2 years ago from Nakon Sawan Province, Thailand.

We have some scary looking critters here in Thailand. Everything looks like it would kill you stone dead. This, of course, is not the case. Unfortunately, everything gets the chop. Most snakes are killed on site also. Even the ones that help us out with the rat population. Such a shame.


Rebeccasutton profile image

Rebeccasutton 2 years ago from Rock Hill, SC

Ever since moving south, I have developed an irrational fear of these little guys! You make some great points about the confusion between different spiders and you pictures are great.


Pastor Wolfe 2 years ago

I use to have a fear for spiders and here recently I have been working at that, now I know longer run lol but my skin craws and I get the chills. But hey great hub you have placed together here!!


nancynurse profile image

nancynurse 2 years ago from Southeast USA

Thanks for sharing. Well written and interesting. Useful information.


Abi Helen 2 years ago

Actually your post was pretty interesting but whenever I see a spider my heart says its only a small creature, that is so small compared to your size but my brains says kill it, it might actually be a pretty poisonous spider. So, before I can identity any of them, I will be holding my slippers and beat the hell out of it till it becomes squishy :) :D


swiftclc profile image

swiftclc 2 years ago from Chandigarh

Before visiting this blog i didn't know any type of spider.


Diana Elise 2 years ago

Lol, I always see a giant house spider in our home, I was like.. "Hello there, I won't touch you just stay there and don't move, if you do, I'll freak out and you might get hurt!"

Hahahaha.


abidareacode profile image

abidareacode 2 years ago from Areacode , Kerala, India

The article was very useful. But the problem am facing that there is not enough time to identify them as they run so fast.THe only way is to hit them to death !! Yesterday also one such 'innocent' killed.


Engelta profile image

Engelta 2 years ago from Albania

I never thought about spiders this hard, but I guess it has always been important to know something more. This is a very informative hub. Wow!


LisaKeating 2 years ago

As I have gotten older, I have started to appreciate and respect most elements of nature more than when I was younger. Spiders are hard to ignore. My basic stance is this: If it comes into my domain (my house), I kill it; if it stays outside in its domain, I leave it alone.


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