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4 Ways to Clear Cloudy Swimming Pool Water

Updated on July 3, 2017
Barack James profile image

Barack is a chemical engineer with a knack for pool chemistry. He has been in the pool maintenance industry for 8 years.

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Cloudy Pool Water: Causes, Treatment, and Preventive Measures

Maybe you have a pool party tomorrow and you suddenly realize that your water is cloudy. Below, you'll find the causes of cloudy water and how to resolve each problem.

Most pools become cloudy...

  1. because free chlorine has become depleted after heavy usage,
  2. after heavy rainfall dilutes the cholorine,
  3. or during a hot sunny days due to UV light eating up free chlorine.

In other words, if the water is cloudy as a result of low free chlorine levels, don't waste time. You need to shock your pool now!

On the other hand, if you are not certain of the cause of cloudiness, this article is for you. You'll need to troubleshoot to find the cause. It could be one of four things:

  1. Improper or imbalanced chemicals,
  2. Faulty filter,
  3. Poor water circulation, or
  4. Environmental factors and debris (particles).

Read on to find out how to diagnose the problem and what to do to clear it up.

Note: These instructions are for a chlorinated pool. Here are the instructions for clearing a cloudy saltwater pool.

Wrong or Imbalanced Pool Chemicals

Swimming pool chemistry is the most tricky part of pool management. Using the wrong chemicals or adding incorrect amounts are the major causes of cloudy water, and may even lead to having algae if extra care is not taken.

  • Improper pH and chlorine levels are the most common culprit: The pH is not directly associated with cloudiness in the water, but it consumes and renders free chlorine ineffective when it's not in balance. And when free chlorine level goes down, it forms combined chlorine (chloramine), which turns the water cloudy and is even ineffective in killing bacteria and other organisms such as algae.
  • You also need to closely monitor changes in the level of total alkalinity (TA). A high TA causes a number of problems, including pH and calcium scaling, both of which are associated with cloudiness: Here is how to lower total alkalinity when it gets out of the recommended range - the process involves aeration to raise the pH to recommended level after adding muriatic acid.
  • High levels of accumulated phosphate and bromine and imbalanced stabilizers such as a cyanuric acid (CYA) might also cause cloudiness. If you are using cyanuric acid often, make sure that the CYA and free chlorine levels are balanced, since excess CYA will significantly reduce free chlorine. Use this chlorine/CYA chart to determine proper levels.

In order to verify which of these chemicals might be imbalanced, you need an accurate, fast, and easy-to-use test kit. I use LaMotte 2056 ColorQ Pro 7 digital water test kit. It saves me lots of time as it is easy to use and very effective for frequent use. It tests pH, free chlorine, combined chlorine, total chlorine, bromine, calcium hardness, total alkalinity, and cyanuric acid all at a glance.

I use a pool calculator to find the exact amount of each chemical to add.

How to Clear Cloudy Pool Water Caused by a Chlorine Imbalance

Ideally, the recommended chlorine levels should be around 3 ppm, which should be the same as the total chlorine if chloramine is at 0 ppm.

The wider the range between free and total chlorine, the more combined chlorine (chloramine) is present in the water.

Combined chlorine should always read below 0.5 ppm or just 0 ppm if possible. This means you need to be testing chlorine levels on a daily basis and adjusting it as appropriate before there's excess chloramine.

If you have an outdoor pool, you can use chlorine stabilizer such as cyanuric acid to prevent chlorine depletion as a result of direct UV light. Remember that cyanuric acid is very strong and if it exceeds the recommended levels, free chlorine will be eaten up and leave the water cloudy and at a high risk of growing algae.

In any case, if combined chlorine reads above 0.5 ppm, your water may turn cloudy and become unsafe for swimming. If this is the case, you need to shock your pool immediately.

Monitoring pH and Total Alkalinity

The concentration of pH in the water affects how all the water's chemicals function, including chlorine. When pH level gets too high, chlorine will become ineffective, and we all know how important chlorine is in a pool.

The correct level of pH in a swimming pool should be between 7.4 ppm and 7.8 ppm, with 7.6 ppm as an ideal level.

To lower pH level, you need to use a pH reducer (pH minus) such as muriatic acid or sulfuric acid.

Anything below pH of 7.0 ppm is too low, and apart from turning water cloudy, brings about harmful bacteria such as algae. To control low pH levels, you need to use a pH Increaser (pH plus) with soda ash.

Finally, ensure that total alkalinity is within the required range of 80 ppm and 120 ppm to avoid bringing up pH levels and causing calcium scaling. This article describes the proper way to lower total alkalinity without extra equipment.

Which tool do you use to measure and control your pool chemistry?

See results

When Chemicals Are Balanced but Pool Water Is Still Cloudy

When all the chemicals are well balanced but your water is still cloudy, there is a good chance that you have particles in your pool.

In this case, a water clarifier is used to collect all the fine particles so that they can be picked up by the filter.

Alternatively, you can use pool floc (flocculant), also known as a super floc, which is a chemical that is used to bring all the clouding particles to the bottom of your pool forming a large cloud which you can then vacuum up using a manual pump. The particles collected using a pool floc will not pass through the filter as they would if a water clarifier were used. Remember to make sure that your filter is set on the 'Backwash' or 'Waste' option when you are vacuuming to avoid any damage that may happen to the filter as a result of clogging.

What If the Swimming Pool Water Is Still Cloudy After Shocking?

In most cases, your water may still look cloudy or milky white after shocking your pool: This is normal and you shouldn't worry. The water will clear up soon, just make sure that your pump and filter are running properly and give it a day.

If the cloudiness persists 24 hours after shocking, it could be possible that you used a poor quality chlorine shock. In this case, you should take the reading of free chlorine and do the shocking all over again using a higher quality chlorine shock.

You should also check that all chemicals—especially pH, total alkalinity, cyanuric acid, and calcium hardness—are within the recommended levels.

Finally, debris could be present in your pool causing continued cloudiness in the water. You can try using a water clarifier to send all particles to the filter, or you can use pool floc and then vacuum using a manual pool pump.

Cloudy Water After Opening a Pool

Depending on how carefully you closed the pool for the winter, at the beginning of summer there may be a problem of algae and cloudy water.

The main cause is chemicals. If your water is free of algae, all you need to do is to test for all the chemicals and adjust, starting with the pH, then chlorine, and other chemicals after that.

If the water still appears cloudy after adjusting all the chemicals, you can try using either water clarifier to remove the debris through the filter or pool flocculant and then vacuum to remove any particles.

Pool Filtration and Circulation Systems

Poor water circulation system can also be a big problem. If your water cannot circulate properly, it will become stagnant and cloudy.

  1. Ensure that the return fittings (eyeball fittings) are turned to point down enough to enable the water at the bottom of the pool to circulate properly. However, the circulation system will largely depend on how the pool was built.
  2. Also, ensure that you are using the right pump size to adequately clean the water.
  3. Make sure the filtration system is running enough. A filter should run 24/7 for the water to remain clean all the time. However, for home pools that are not busy, at least 8 -10 hours a day might suffice.
  4. Remove particles that may be blocking your filter. Your filter system continuously cleans the water, and if it does not function properly, the water becomes dirty, cloudy, and may even develop algae. Large particles are fond of blocking filtration systems, especially the diatomaceous earth (D.E) and cartridge pool filters.
  5. Ensure that you regularly clean, backwash, or replace the D.E and cartridge filter medium as appropriate.

Which Pool Filter Is Best?

There are three types of filters: DE (diatomaceous earth), cartridge (paper), and sand. Each has its own pros and cons.

  • A DE pool filter is the most efficient when it comes to filtration, followed by cartridge and sand filters respectively.
  • On the other hand, DE and cartridge filters are recommended for home pools and may not be the best when it comes to public (apartments or hotels) pools due to their tendency to clog and require frequent replacement of filter medium.
  • A sand filter is always best when it comes to public or semi-public swimming pools, but the sand used in a sand filter also gets clogged and becomes ineffective, which may cause your water to be cloudy or dirty. Consequently, the sand should be replaced every year.

Here is a detailed guide on types of pool filters, how to select the best one, and how to properly maintain it.

The Environment Around the Pool and Foreign Particles

The environment and weather may also be the cause of cloudy water.

  • Free chlorine depletes more quickly in full sunlight, but if trees and buildings are next to your pool, direct sun will be blocked.
  • Rain also has an affect. All you have to do is test all chemicals, especially chlorine, and adjust them as appropriate.
  • Large and small foreign particles may find their way into the water, especially during spring. Also, body oil used by swimmers accumulate in the pool in most cases causing cloudiness. You can use nets to remove visible particles or simply use clarifier or pool flocculant and vacuum to do away with fine particles and oily substance.
  • In early growth stages, algae also causes cloudiness. Control the amounts of pH, chlorine, TA, phosphate, and other pool sanitizers.

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    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 2 days ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi sunny, from the look of things, the problem is caused by your chemical readings: Your free chlorine is a little lower. You need to raise the level of free chlorine to settle between 2.5 ppm and 3 ppm and the combined chlorine should not exceed 0.5 ppm. That means you need to shock your pool using chlorine and make sure you do free chlorine test on a regular basis and adjust the level as appropriate and you will not have a cloudy pool.

      Also, Alkalinity (TA) should be kept between 80 and 120 ppm for pools with liners and between 100 and 125 ppm for pools made of plaster, which means the TA is slightly higher and you need to lower it a little using using muriatic acid. Muriatic acid also lowers the level of pH and extra care needs to be taken not to add a lot of it.

      Finally, your Calcium Hardness is too low: If you have a plaster pool, you need to keep calcium hardness between 250 ppm and 350 ppm and do it as soon as possible to avoid dissolving calcium out of plaster, tiles, and concrete. This could be the main reason why your pool water looks a little cloudy all the time.

      For a trouble-free pool, make sure you test your chemicals regularly and adjust them appropriately: Find out more about when to do test for your chemicals and the recommended levels for each chemical in the following link: https://hubpages.com/living/Swimming-Pool-Chemistr...

    • profile image

      sunny 2 days ago

      My pool has a little cloudy, I can see the bottom, but the water not very clear. Every reading is good: FC 1.8, TC 2.4, CC 0.6, PH 7.6, Hardness 180, Alkalinity 126. The pool doctor let me use Super Clarifier, running pump 8-12 hours, then turn pump off for 6+ hours, waiting particles fall to bottom of the pool. Then vacumm on Waster or Drain. I have done that, but the water always a little cloudy. Why? Thanks.

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 8 days ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Portia, algaecide is not very necessary to use if you are using chlorine shock in your pool unless there are some signs of algae presence in the pool. Just make sure your chlorine is always 3 ppm by shocking your pool regularly and you wont have any algae growth in your pool. However, if you feel algae cleaner is good for you, you can do it on a weekly basis by adding .25 ounce for your 1,200 gallons above ground pool.

      For pH up, 1,200 gallons above ground pool will need about half a cup, while pH down may be as little as less than a quarter of a cup depending on how far your pH has drifted. you can use this Kem - Tek guide for more info about adding chemicals to a pool: http://www.kem-tek.com/kemtek_howto/how-pool-dosag...

    • profile image

      Portia 9 days ago

      I have a above ground small 1,200 gallon pool how much algae cleaner and ph up or down do I use for such a small pool! HELLLP Please!

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 2 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Bob, you can use pH Reducer to get the level down to the range of 7.4 ppm - 7.6 ppm, then test for total chlorine and ensure that it reads 3 ppm, if not, add some chlorine shock to get total chlorine up to 3 ppm and the pool will clear up.

    • profile image

      Bob 2 weeks ago

      I added PH Rise directly to pool accidentally and water is milky. How do I fix this?

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 2 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Sheila, ensure that pH is between 7.4 ppm and 7.6 ppm and total chlorine is reading 3 ppm for the water to clear up. If all the readings are ok but water is still cloudy (white), that means your pool has some dirt, try using water clarifier to collect and remove any dirt that may be present in your pool and all will be fine.

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 3 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      I'M happy for your progress Matt. Yes, once you get chlorine stable at 3 ppm you can swim. You will need to add more of liquid chlorine (shock) and maintain it at 3 ppm (total chlorine). See more about how to shock your pool and how often you should do every pool chemical test and adjust them as appropriate in this link: https://dengarden.com/swimming-pools/Shocking-a-No...

    • profile image

      matt 3 weeks ago

      Hi, I'm nearly there now just getting the chlorine in...once everything shows as "ok" or near ok on my test strips we can dive in right?

      How often then should I test the water and re-balance etec if neccessary? Thanks so much again for your help. M

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 3 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Yes Matt, try a stronger pH Increaser and add Borate if you can...

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 3 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Matt, increasing pH should not be a big problem, maybe you can try a different or stronger brand like Pool & Spa pH Increaser if the pH+ you are using is not working out. Also, you can use some Borate to help stabilize the pH and all will be fine. About the foam, I think it has taken too long to clear up, you can try one of the best foam removers to clear the foam.

    • profile image

      Matt 3 weeks ago

      Me again hello! I'm baffled the foam is clearin as you said but still there. The TA is now in the OK band but I've been adding ph+ as you said to get that right first and that reading is still at the bottom of the scale?? Hadnt added anything yet to raise TA any ideas please this won't be sor ted before winter at this rate lol

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 3 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Douglas, try using more liquid chlorine shock and a stabilzer (Cyanuric acid) if that can work for you; 0 free chlorine may be also as a result of excess sunlight which can be controlled using Cyanuric acid. Also, Zinc helps prevent reaction between free Chlorine and Brass or any other metal, you can give zinc a try if all fail to work for your pool. Vacuuming may also work in case you have debris in your pool, you can use pool floc and then vacuum the pool using a manual pool pump.

    • profile image

      Douglas H. 3 weeks ago

      Barack, thank you for your reply, it was very much appreciated. That may be the cause of my cloudy water, I can't seem to raise the free chlorine level, it's at 0 despite everything else being OK. I keep putting burnout in the pool but it dose't raise the free chlorine level. According to the pool company, there are a lot of people in this area ( Upstate NY) who are having the same problem of not being able to rise the free chlorine level.

      Thank you again.

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 3 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi, Douglas, even in a right concentration, Chlorine reacts with any metal including stainless metal objects through corrosion. So the brass object will put free chlorine to more use and may make your pool water look cloudy due to low free chlorine in the pool.

    • profile image

      Douglas H 3 weeks ago

      Would a brass object in the pool make the water go cloudy and prevent a rise in the chlorine level?

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 4 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi, Terri, Sorry for everything. Which color is your pool water? Is it green, yellow, or black? If your pool water has one of the colors means you have pool algae. To get rid of algae, first, ensure that pH is reading between 7.4 ppm and 7.6 ppm. Secondly, you need to use more chlorine shock up to 12 ppm and leave it to work on the algae until the color clears up. If the pool is cloudy though, that means you have low free chlorine levels, ensure you do chlorine test and if it is below 3 ppm, add chlorine shock to raise the level up to 3 ppm (total chlorine), alternatively, if you have a test kit that can test for chloramine, ensure that chloramine is 0 ppm or not more than 0.5 since chloramine is the substance causing a cloudy pool water. If you are certain your pool is not affected by algae, and it is not cloudy too, that means you have sand in your pool as a result of a faulty sand filter: If that is the case, vacuuming the pool won't help the situation and you have to replace the sand urgently, after replacing the sand, you can use pool flock to collect all the debris present in your pool to the bottom of the pool then vacuum it to remove all the particles and your pool will clear up. Feel free to communicate any progress or problem for more help.

    • profile image

      Terri 4 weeks ago

      Please Please Help! My divorce left me all alone with a house I am having hard time managing.

      I have an In-ground Pacific oval shaped pool with an offset step in the shallow end. The pool is size 17 by 35 feet. The liner was replaced in 2004 and the loop lock cover was installed in 2005. It has a sand filter.

      I didn't open it last year. I didn't know that was a big no no! My filter has been running 24 hours a day for two weeks. I have put in 25 gallons of shock. The pool guy I hired to help me says that I have 2 inches of slugged on the bottom of the pool. I guess everything has been getting through the loop lock pool cover that looked fine to me. The deep end has been vacuumed twice and I keep brushing the edges and still can’t see the bottom. I know the sand needs changed which I have asked them to do many times now. I don't want to kill the filter or my electric bill fund. What do I do in this situation? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

      Thanks!

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Welcome Matt, Goodluck!

    • profile image

      Matt Faulkner 5 weeks ago

      Blimey - what a lot to do - yes have been skimming the soap off for a while now (even before I wrote to you) water underneath looks lovley though!

      I am just using a cardboard strip you dip in the water and then compare to a chart. Thanks again will be on it again tomorrow. M

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi, did you try using hand skimmer to remove the foam? If the foam persists you can use "Bestway Clear-Water Foam Remover" available on Amazon or at your local pool store. About the chemicals, you could have used liquid chlorine for faster results since it dissolves faster than chlorine tablet. I am not sure of the test kit you are using but make sure Total Chlorine is 3 ppm (free chlorine at least 2.5 ppm). The pH also is still too low, use pH increaser to raise pH levels to 7.4 - 7.6 ppm. Total alkalinity should be kept between 80 and 120 ppm which means your TA is still too low, use baking soda (alkalinity increaser) to raise the TA level. Don't add the chemicals at the same time, start with pH then chlorine then TA: Here is a link to how chemicals should be reading for a pool https://hubpages.com/living/Swimming-Pool-Chemistr... - feel free to communicate any progress.

    • profile image

      Matt Faulkner 5 weeks ago

      Hi, me again! Sorry for another question - I've "inherited" this pool and trying to get it round. Amazingly I had done most of the stuff you kindly sent me on your last post but I then took a reading of the pool:

      Free chlorine - 0

      Alk 40 ppm

      Ph 6.2

      Chlorine tablets dissolving slowly as I write, not sure how to get the other two readings up though - could you advise please (I think that may help get rid of the soap suds too?!) Thanks again Matt

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Welcome Matt

    • profile image

      matt faulkner 5 weeks ago

      Thanks so much - being patient with the damn thing! M

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi, Matt, the foam is obviously caused by the expired pool shock you used. The form will eventually clear up just give it time, or you can speed up the process by using hand skimmer to remove excess foam. Once the foam clears and your pool is still green, make sure you shock your pool with a good and high-quality chlorine shock or algaecide. Also, ensure that the pH and Alkalinity readings are within the recommended levels before shocking the pool. Here is a link to a complete guide on how to clear a green pool: https://dengarden.com/swimming-pools/clearing-up-a...

    • profile image

      Matt Faulkner 5 weeks ago

      Hi, my pool was green I shocked it but the shock stuff was 6 months out of date (with hindsight!) I know have a saopy type film on the top of the pool and it just bubbles when it goes through the filter. I have added chlorine but waiting for it to dissolve...any other ideas how to get rid of the stuff please?

      Many thanks

      Matt

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      You are so welcome Orlando

    • profile image

      Orlando 5 weeks ago

      Thank you so much for your response.

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      You are much welcome Karen...

    • profile image

      Karen 5 weeks ago

      Thanks again. Thinking that may be the problem.

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Karen, are you using a sand filter? If so, the brown silt at the bottom of the pool means your sand filter is faulty letting sand to come out into the pool making it appear cloudy. Stop vacuuming the pool and ensure that your filter is ok. See more about taking care of sand filter here: https://hubpages.com/living/Swimming-Pool-Filters-...

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Orlando, NO, you cannot add chlorine shock, pH increaser, and metal control at the same time. If both pH and free chlorine are reading low, the first thing you should do is to ensure that pH level is somewhere between 7.4 to 7.6 ppm before adding chlorine shock. Secondly, shock your pool so that free chlorine reaches 1.5 ppm. Free chlorine of zero will make pool algae grow in your pool. See how to shock your pool here: https://dengarden.com/swimming-pools/Shocking-a-No...

    • profile image

      Karen 5 weeks ago

      Thank you. I have been vacuuming because there is a fine brown silt that is collecting on the bottom of the pool. Hard to vacuum as it is so fine it dispurses like a puff of dust as soon as the pump is turned on. Frustrating mess.

    • profile image

      Orlando 5 weeks ago

      Hi Barack, my question is this...can I add shock, pH up, and metal control at one time? I've been going through this process to de-cloud pool since last Wednesday. Also free chlorine remains at 0 and I cannot get up, how can I fix this?

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Karen, total or calcium hardness will not make your pool appear cloudy. Calcium hardness of 250-350 ppm is needed mainly to protect pool parts such as tiles, plaster, or concrete from corroding. If your chemicals especially chlorine reading is ok, you can try vacuuming the pool if that will help. Also, check to ensure that your pool filter is working properly and filter medium (ie sand) not worn out if any.

    • profile image

      Karen 5 weeks ago

      Pool water is cloudy and when using a test strip it shows all levels good except very low total hardness. Everything I read states this will not cause a cloudy pool but high hardness levels will? Help!

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Chan, a stabilizer does not clear a cloudy pool. A stabilizer is only used to help maintain chlorine levels, especially on sunny days to protect chlorine from UV light that consumes chlorine at a very high rate. I suggest you measure free chlorine level and ensure that it is around 1.5 ppm, if not, you need to shock your pool using chlorine. See how to shock your pool: https://dengarden.com/swimming-pools/Shocking-a-No...

    • profile image

      Chan 5 weeks ago

      My levels are good except for the stabilizer. . I added a stabilizer to the pool to and the water is still cloudy. What else should I do?

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 5 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Sara, I don't think there is a problem with the sand. The sand can work as long as 5 years if the pool is not very busy unless it is a commercial pool. You should try backwashing your filter, remember it is recommended you backwash your sand filter at least once a week. If backwashing your filter does not work, then try vacuuming your pool to remove any particles that may be present in your pool. How to back a sand filter: https://hubpages.com/living/Swimming-Pool-Filters-...

    • profile image

      Sara 5 weeks ago

      We had our cloudy pool water tested ad were told all levels were good and swimmable. It was suggested to use a clarifier but that hasn't worked. Should we look at changing out the sand in our filter? We purchased house in December of 2015 and sand hasn't been changed since. Not certain when it was changed before

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 7 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Lynnette, until you balance all the chemical readings in your pool it will not clear up. Use muriatic acid to get TA down. Also ensure Ph and free Chlorine are balanced.

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      Lynnette 7 weeks ago

      I have high chlorine, high free chlorine, low pH and high Alkalinity. I have backwashed the pool the last two days, cleaned filters and ran pump 24 hrs. Cannot get rid of cloudy water. Pool is in ground 32,000 gallons, water is cold. Daily temp mid 6o's outside, opened it two weeks ago and cannot get it clear.

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 8 weeks ago from Green City in the Sun

      Hi Richard, high levels of Phosphate means your pool is about to turn green since Algae feeds on phosphate. Phosphate remover is not enough. You need to shock your pool using chlorine and maintain the right level of free chlorine all the time.

    • profile image

      Richard 8 weeks ago

      All the readings on our pool are good.

      Our water has been tested an our phosphate are high. We have added phosphate reducer twice in the last 3 weeks. We have vacuumed an back washed everyday. An our pool is still cloudy.Any suggestions.

    • Barack James profile image
      Author

      Barack James 7 months ago from Green City in the Sun

      Don't mind Andrew; you can still clear the cloudiness, just follow the steps illustrated in this page and you are good to go. I don't understand why you put acid into the skimmer but that alone cannot damage or turn your pool cloudy. Cloudiness may be as a result of chlorine PH or Chlorine levels in your pool. Check on the two and make sure they are balanced.

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      Andrew 7 months ago

      I put acid sraight into skimmer box now pool has gone cloudy have i damaged the pool

    • Barack James profile image
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      Barack James 23 months ago from Green City in the Sun

      Cheryl; from my own experience, I guess you are using Linear-Quat algaecide containg "Alkyl dimethylbenzylammonium chloride", which tends to foam, stop using it: Rather, next time try Poly-Quat 60 algaecide, which has the ingredient "Poly{oxyethylene(dimethyliminio)ethylene(dimethyliminio)ethylene dichloride}", this is a situation of get what you pay for. The foams will eventually breakdown but after about one week; you can use chlorine shock to speed up the algaecide breakdown.

      Also, vinyl and sometimes plaster pools with insufficient calcium tend to foam: If the issue is not the algaecide you are using, try raising Calcium Hardness (CH) levels to at least 100-150 ppm. Hope that helps!

    • profile image

      Cheryl Cheff 23 months ago

      Added algacide to pool and have had white foam on top for 3 days. How do I get rid of it?

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