Closing an Inground Swimming Pool? How to Winterize a Pool for an Easy Spring Opening.

Updated on June 17, 2016

How to winterize an inground swimming pool

Closing an inground swimming pool is a lot more challenging than opening an inground swimming pool. The challenge is removing all the water properly from the pool equipment and plumbing as well as winterizing it for the freezing temperatures that are on the way. If you winterize you pool properly in the fall, a spring opening will be a snap, and you will be the envy of you neighborhood pool owners.

I took a step by step approach with many pictures so I could just about walk you through the process as easy as possible without actually being there to help you. As I closed my pool this fall, I took very detailed pictures to help me animate the procedure so you won't run into any problems. If you have any problems or questions, just shoot me a comment and I will answer it ASAP, because at this time of the year, time is of the essence.


Step 1: Preparing your pool for winter

First and foremost, your pool needs to be totally clean and the PH, Alkalinity, Hardness, and Chlorine levels need to be set to their ideal levels. This is the most important step, because if you close a dirty pool, it will only get worst throughout the winter. So clean it, set it, and forget it!


Recommended pool winterizing kits

Step 2: Buy a winterizing kit

When you purchase a winterizing kit, buy one that will winterize the amount of water you have in your pool, if you buy a kit that is to small it, will be wasted money, so know your pools water capacity and buy the right kit. I had to buy 2 kits this year because the company I buy my winterizing kits from stopped selling the large kits for 25,000 gal pools. Also, purchase a disposable floating chlorine dispenser that will float around your pool when the pool isn't frozen, it will keep the water clear, and it helps kill any algae that wants to grow on the warm spring days.


Skimmer gizmo and return line caps
Skimmer gizmo and return line caps | Source
Skimmer and gizmo
Skimmer and gizmo | Source
Teflon tape on threads
Teflon tape on threads | Source
Teflon tape on return line threads
Teflon tape on return line threads | Source
Lower the water to just below the return lines
Lower the water to just below the return lines | Source
After all the water is removed from the return lines, cap them.
After all the water is removed from the return lines, cap them. | Source
Return lines capped
Return lines capped | Source
Add antifreeze to the skimmer lines and install gizmo, about 1 half gallon. I know the gizmo is already installed in the pic, sorry.
Add antifreeze to the skimmer lines and install gizmo, about 1 half gallon. I know the gizmo is already installed in the pic, sorry. | Source
Add more antifreeze after gizmo is installed, about 1 half gallon.
Add more antifreeze after gizmo is installed, about 1 half gallon. | Source
Place the skimmer cover in a plastic bag and wrap it tight to keep water out of skimmer during the off season.
Place the skimmer cover in a plastic bag and wrap it tight to keep water out of skimmer during the off season. | Source
Place the skimmer cover back on the skimmer.
Place the skimmer cover back on the skimmer. | Source

Step 3: Start adding the winterizing kit

It's best to follow the instructions on the winterizing kit, that's why they're there. You need to add the PhosFree to your pool water first to remove any Phosphates in the water, by removing the Phosphates in your pool water, you will stop the growth of algae throughout the winter. Add the PhosFree a week before closing your pool, just poor it into the filter and let it do its thing. I recommend starting the process one weekend before closing your pool.


Step 4: Add the rest of the winterizing kit

Start by adding the bottle of metal free to the pool water, just sprinkle it across the top of the water, do not add it to the filter. The metal free will remove any damaging metals in the pool water, this will prevent any stains or water discoloration in the off season.

At this point your pool water should be clean, free of metals and free of phosphates, the chlorine level should be almost perfect and your PH, Alkalinity, and Hardness levels should be at the ideal levels. Now it's time to drain the pool.


Step 5: Lowering the pool water

According to some winterizing kits, you should lower your water level about 18 inches from the top of the skimmer. An easy way to determine if the water is low enough is to lower it to the bottom of the return jets/ lines. When you lower the water level below the return lines, it allows the water to drain from them as well, so lower the water to just below the return lines (see the pictures for details).

Use the pool pump to lower the water level, turn the diverter handle to backwash, then turn the inlet lever to draw water from the bottom drain of the pool and not the skimmer. This will allow you to lower the pool water well below the skimmer without sucking air into the filter. While the pool water is draining, start removing the jet nozzles on the inlet lines, skimmer basket, ladder and handrails. If you have a safety cover, start pulling up the anchors on the pool deck and start unwrapping the pool cover that you have in storage.

Once the water is below the return lines, you can shut off the pump. But before you shut the pump off for the winter, you need to suck the remaining water from the skimmer. The best way I found to suck the remaining water from the skimmer is to use the pump one last time. When you're ready to stop pumping water from the bottom and the water level is where you want it, turn the lever on the inlet pipes to skimmer until you hear the pump suck air, then turn off the pump, but leave the inlet lever on skimmer.

Now is a good time to add antifreeze to the skimmer , the water level should be low enough in the skimmer so that when you look down into the skimmer you cannot see any water in the pipe, if there is no water in the pipe, add your pool antifreeze, about 1 quart to 1 half gallon. Install the gizmo with Teflon tape wrapped around the threads and then add about 1 quart to 1 half gallon of antifreeze to the skimmer housing so that it surrounds the gizmo.

The gizmo is installed for 2 reasons, one is to stop water form reentering the skimmer lines during the winter and two, it is air filled, so that if water does enter the skimmer and freezes, the ice will expand and crush the gizmo and not split or crack your skimmer housing. Once the gizmo is installed and the antifreeze is all set, take the skimmer cover and wrap in it in a plastic bag, just take a plastic bag and put the skimmer cover in it, then wrap it so that the top of the cover is wrapped tight and the remaining part of the bag is on the underside of the cover. Next, install the skimmer cover on the skimmer (See pictures) this plastic bag will help keep out rainwater during the off season.


Clean Your Pool Steps Before You Close Your Pool

Install an air line fitting on the bottom of your filter basket housing, remove the drain plug and install the air line fitting.
Install an air line fitting on the bottom of your filter basket housing, remove the drain plug and install the air line fitting. | Source
Attach an air line from your compressor,  remove the water from the return lines, make sure the diverter handle is in the filter position.
Attach an air line from your compressor, remove the water from the return lines, make sure the diverter handle is in the filter position. | Source

Step 6: Blow out the lines with compressed air

Blowing out the lines sounds daunting but it's quite simple. On the bottom of the basket housing at your pool pump, there is a little plug, remove the plug, and install an air line nozzle so you can attach an air line easily (see pictures for more detail). Drain the basket housing of water, drain the pool pump from the bottom drain and unscrew the vent at the top of the pump to allow air to enter the top of the pump and let the water drain faster out if the filter.

Once the pump and the filter basket housing is drained, reinstall the drain cap on the filter, the vent cap and install the air line fitting to the bottom of the basket housing. Clean out any leftover chlorine in the self chlorinator. Set the diverter handle to filter and add compressed air to the filter at the air line fitting. Watch the water drain from the return lines, when the water stops coming out of the return lines shut off the compressed air and cap the lines with special caps designed to keep water out during the off season. These caps have rubber o-rings but I like to use Teflon tap on the threads for added protection, I also add Teflon tape to the threads of the gizmo for added protection.

CAUTION! TURN OFF THE POWER TO THE POOL PUMP AS SOON AS YOU'RE done DRAINING THE POOL TO AVOID ACCIDENTAL CYCLEING OF THE POOL PUMP WITH NO WATER, IT WILL OVER HEAT AND MELT YOU'RE PUMP, RESLUTING IN UNNECESSARY REPAIR COSTS!


Add 1 half gallon of pool antifreeze to your pool pump basket.
Add 1 half gallon of pool antifreeze to your pool pump basket. | Source
Add pool antifreeze to your chlorinator, 1 half gallon.
Add pool antifreeze to your chlorinator, 1 half gallon. | Source
Leave the diverter valve handle in a neutral position for the off season to allow ice to expand without damage
Leave the diverter valve handle in a neutral position for the off season to allow ice to expand without damage | Source

Step 7: Add pool antifreeze to the pool pump

The pump and filter should be drained by now and the pump basket housing should only have a little water in it, if you think there is still too much water in the basket housing, just scoop it out with a plastic cup. Add about 1 half gallon of pool antifreeze to the pump basket housing and reinstall the cover. Add pool antifreeze to the self chlorinator, about 1 half gallon, then reinstall the cover. You should only need about 2-3 gallons of pool antifreeze to close the pool unless it's a huge pool; I am basing the capacities on a 23000 gallon pool.

Place the handle of the diverter valve in a neutral position between filter and waste, or something like that, just don't leave the lever in one of the designated positions because there is still water in the diverter, when you put the handle in a neutral position it will allow the water to freeze and expand without cracking something internally on the diverter valve (See picture)

After the pool pump has been winterized, remove the drain cap from the bottom of the sand filter or DE filter just to finish draining the water from inside the tank. The filter is saturated with water and I like to let it drain thoroughly so I will leave the drain cap off for 24 hours. If you have a filter cartridge, remove the cartridge and power wash it then store it for the winter.


Pop up your anchors. I start with the one under the diving board because I cant use the pipe to install the cover on this anchor.
Pop up your anchors. I start with the one under the diving board because I cant use the pipe to install the cover on this anchor. | Source
That is me unrolling the pool cover, see, I really do what I say I do :)
That is me unrolling the pool cover, see, I really do what I say I do :) | Source
Lay out the cover on the side of the pool so you can slide it over the pool easily. It's nice to have two people when installing the cover, but not necessary.
Lay out the cover on the side of the pool so you can slide it over the pool easily. It's nice to have two people when installing the cover, but not necessary. | Source
Plastic spring covers
Plastic spring covers | Source
Install the pool cover the long wat first.
Install the pool cover the long wat first. | Source
Then install the center springs next so the cover does not fill up with water.
Then install the center springs next so the cover does not fill up with water. | Source
The finished product
The finished product | Source

Step 8: Installing the pool safety cover

By now you should have all the pool cover anchor's popped up the cover should be ready to install. A safety cover has and up side and a down side. When installing your safety cover, you will notice that the down side has hard plastic belts stitched into the cover to protect the cover from rubbing on the concrete during windy days, it also allows the cover to stretch without damage when snow and ice build up on top of the cover.

The cover is made to stretch like a trampoline, there are springs where the cover attaches to the anchors, so when the snow and ice build up on top of the safety cover, it will stretch to the top of the water. After the ice and snow melt in the spring, it will spring back up and the debris will dry and blow off.

Start the safety cover installation by rolling out the cover on the pool deck or your lawn, find the end of the cover that goes over the stairs, and place the cover near the edge of the pool so you can slide the cover over the pool easily. Slide the spring covers over each spring as you attach them to the anchors, otherwise they may fall off into the water when installing the cover. Start by attaching the two springs on each end in the center of the cover, the long way. (See pictures)

Use the metal pole that came with the pool cover to install the springs onto the anchors. If the cover has no spring installation tool, you can use a 3/4 metal pipe. Slide the tool into the loop end of the spring, put the pipe over the anchor, move the pipe straight up and down over the anchor and use your foot to slide the spring onto the anchor.

Once the cover is supported in the center the long way, find the center springs in the center the short way and attach them as well. Installing the cover doesn't have to be done perfectly, it just prevents the cover from filling up with water, making the install easy. From there, just install the remaining spring covers and attach the remaining springs to their appropriate anchors. Be sure that the straps that attach the cover to the springs are lying flat on the concrete and not twisted, it looks better and there is a hard plastic strip stitched into the strap to prevent premature wear.

I use to remove the pool light for fear of it cracking from the ice pushing against it but now I leave it in. I have left in the pool for over 6 years and have never had a problem. It is personal preference, but if you want to remove the pool light, there is one screw at the top of the light, and the bottom of the light slides into a holder. Just remove the top screw and tilt the top of the light out, the bottom of the light will slide out of the holder. The pool light wire should be long enough to store the light inside of the diving board, which is normal practice of the pool companies if the light is removed.

Installing the safety cover spring onto the anchor

Place the tool through the loop end of the spring.
Place the tool through the loop end of the spring. | Source
Straighten the tool on top of the anchor.
Straighten the tool on top of the anchor. | Source
Place your foot on the spring and push down.
Place your foot on the spring and push down. | Source
Push it all the way down until it hooks the anchor, if I can do it while holding a camera, you can do it :)
Push it all the way down until it hooks the anchor, if I can do it while holding a camera, you can do it :) | Source

Your Pool is ready for winter

So that's it! Store you ladder, hand rails and pool accessories for the winter, I use a bucket to store all the baskets, nozzles and whatever else that goes to the pool all in one place so when spring comes you can find everything easily. If you think I may have left out a step or you have a question, just ask and I will get back to you asap. Most people won't attempt closing an inground swimming pool for fear that they might do something wrong. Once you close a pool once, it will become easier each year and it will save you around $200- $300. Plus you will have peace of mind that it's done right. I had my pool closed once by a local pool company and my pool was dark green in the spring, it took me two week to clear it up and a lot of chemicals, needless to say I have done it myself since then.


Questions & Answers

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        8 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Tom,

        I recommend checking with the manufacturer or checking the label on the bottles if you have any left.

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        8 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi PeachWillow,

        If you live in a warm climate where the temps don't get below freezing, yes, the closing instruction will vary a lot.

      • profile image

        PeachWillow 

        8 months ago

        When closing an inground pool, do your instructions vary if we decide to NOT add pool anti-freeze?

      • profile image

        Tom Homeier 

        8 months ago

        I didn’t use my pool this year and I wonder if the pool line antifreeze will still be good and make it through two winters? I vacuumed the lines before I capped it and used 7 gallons on pool line antifreeze.

        Regards;

        Tom Homeier

        tjhomeier@cox.net

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        9 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Paulette,

        The air line fitting is a standard fitting that you would hook to an air tool or air hose.

        Once you blow out the skimmer line there will still be some water in the line but it will be down about 5-6 feet and you probably won't be able to see it, I add about a half gallon down that skimmer line, install the gizzmo, then add the rest of the antifreeze to the skimmer basket. Fill the basket on the pump with antifreeze and don't worry about filling the lines coming into the pump from the pool, one comes from the bottom and one comes from the skimmer. When blowing out the skimmer line and bottom drain line, the water levels should be below the frost line. Let me know if you have more questions.

      • profile image

        Paulette 

        9 months ago

        Hi. Thanks for the great instructions. However; I have 2 questions...

        1. Where do you get an air line fitting to fit the bottom of the filter basket? Mine filter has a black screw in “key” or knob” and the opening is quite large and has treading?

        2. You said to fill the filter basket and bromatator, in my case, with anil-freeze, you didn’t explain how you get the anti-freeze down and into the return pipes? Do you turn the pump on for a couple seconds to move the anti-freeze into the return pipes? Thank you again for your help

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        9 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Amanda,

        I recommend still winterizing the filter and lines, but as far as the pool water goes, if you're not going to reuse it, let it get green.

      • profile image

        Amanda 

        10 months ago

        Hi! We will be replacing our liner for our in-ground pool next spring. We were going to drain the pool to the level of the deep end, where the shallow end meets. Do you still recommend using winterizing chemicals? In the spring, we are just going to drain the pool anyways. Thanks!

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        10 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Regina,

        Just make sure most of all the water is drained for the lines and use non-toxic environmentally safe antifreeze in the lines and filter.

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        10 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Tammy,

        No just cover the pool, the snow and rain from winter will fill it back up naturally.

      • profile image

        Regina 

        10 months ago

        Thank you so much for this detailed article. I can't get on the pool company's schedule for another 6 weeks so am going to attempt this for the first time myself this year.

      • profile image

        Tammy 

        10 months ago

        Do you raise the water level back up after plugging and anti freeze ..

      • profile image

        Rocky B 

        10 months ago

        what size air compressor is needed?

      • profile image

        Mike M. 

        11 months ago

        I always have opened my pool but paid a pool company to close. After reading your step by step instructions I'm ready to close it myself. Thanks, Mike

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        20 months ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Stephanie,

        Not really, but you can rent one pretty cheap. Let me know if you have more questions.

      • profile image

        Stephanie Raynor 

        20 months ago

        What if I don't have an air compressor to blow out the pump? Is there an alternative?

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        5 years ago from New Hampshire

        Hi Robert,

        When you work in the automotive field, you learn to do everything yourself, and usually just as good, if not better than the professionals. (because it's my stuff, lol) There a very few jobs I will hire someone to do for me, and if I do hire someone, I watch every detail so I can do it myself the next time :) Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it very much.

      • profile image

        robert1980 

        5 years ago

        Not bad that's pretty much right on.I'm a Supervisor/Swimming Pool Technician.Very detailed by the way.

      • eddiecarrara profile imageAUTHOR

        Eddie Carrara 

        5 years ago from New Hampshire

        Hi swimfan,

        Just trying to help my fellow pool owner, a lot of pool owners will pay someone to close their pool, costing them over $250. It's really not that hard, plus you have a better chance of having clear water in the spring if you do it yourself and do it right :)

        Thanks for the comment.

      • swimfan profile image

        swimfan 

        5 years ago from United States

        Wow, really detailed, step-by-step information. I appreciate the effort it must have taken to put this article together.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, dengarden.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://dengarden.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)